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Catalog 2016-2017
Louisiana State University Health Sciences Center
   
 
  Dec 12, 2017
 
 
    
Catalog 2016-2017

Course Descriptions

Contract All Courses |

 

Physical Therapy

  
  •  

    PHTH 7554 - Principles of Laboratory and Radiological Medicine


    2 Credits

    A study of basic laboratory and radiological findings that are pertinent to the physical therapy management of patients with a variety of diagnoses. Emphasis is placed on use of these tools in determining the appropriateness of physical therapy intervention.

  
  •  

    PHTH 7555 - Introduction to Patient Care


    3 Credits

    A course of study which introduces basic clinical skills fundamental to physical therapy practice including patient interview skills, positioning, transfers, vital signs and manual muscle testing.

  
  •  

    PHTH 7556 - Clinical Procedures


    1 Credit

    A laboratory course with focused clinical experiences throughout the semester with emphasis on practicing introductory patient/client-related skills and application of material presented in all concurrent courses.

  
  •  

    PHTH 7557 - Biomechanics and Ergonomics


    3 Credits

    A study of biomechanics and how the science applies to normal human movement and common dysfunctions manifested following pathological, traumatic, or developmental insults. The relationships between changes in tissue and concomitant biomechanical adaptations are explored. Ergonomic relationships are presented as related to home, work, and play environments and activities.

  
  •  

    PHTH 7558 - Clinical Orthopedics


    3 Credits

    A lecture and laboratory course that focuses on etiology, diagnosis, surgical management, and physical therapy intervention for a broad variety of musculoskeletal conditions.

  
  •  

    PHTH 7559 - Principles of Research II


    1 Credit

    A continuation of research I with an emphasis on research design and synthesis of information for literature review.

  
  •  

    PHTH 7560 - Evaluation of Patients with Locomotor Dysfunction


    2 Credits

    A lecture and laboratory course dealing with developmental, normal and pathologic gait. Focus is on diagnostic skills, using a variety of experimental and clinically applicable tests and measures.

  
  •  

    PHTH 7561 - Physical Agents and Mechanical Modalities


    3 Credits

    A course of study dealing with operational physics, physiological action, and rationale for the use of various physical and mechanical agents such as light, sound, heat, cold, traction and compression.

  
  •  

    PHTH 7562 - Evaluation and Management of Patients with Musculoskeletal Disorders


    3 Credits

    A course of study that examines the role of physical therapists in the evaluation and management of a variety of musculoskeletal conditions. Students learn to develop exercise programs that are tailored to patient needs and diagnoses.

  
  •  

    PHTH 7563 - Clinical Externship I


    1 Credit

    (Previously termed Clinical Practice I) Sixty hours of clinical experience in a variety of clinical settings. Emphasis is placed on development of professional behavior, communication skills and the practice of skills acquired during previous and concurrent semester courses.

  
  •  

    PHTH 7564 - Manual Therapy I


    2 Credits

    The first of two courses addressing techniques of manual therapy in the management of musculoskeletal disorders. The primary emphasis in this course is on general principles of mobilization and treatment of peripheral joint and temporomandibular problems.

  
  •  

    PHTH 7565 - Physiological Adaptation to Exercise and Nutrition


    3 Credits

    A lecture and laboratory course that focuses on principles of exercise, body composition analysis, strength and endurance training, and exercise prescription and how the body physiologically adapts in a variety of situations. Principles of nutrition and physiological response to changes in diet are also addressed.

  
  •  

    PHTH 7566 - Principles of Research III


    1 Credit

    This third of five sequential research courses emphasizes application of skills covered in Research I and II, and includes development of a written research proposal in preparation for data collection and interpretation. Research design, data-collection, measurement, and analysis and interpretation of results are expanded upon. Issues related to tests and measurements in physical therapy practice will also be presented.

  
  •  

    PHTH 7567 - Neuroscience I


    2 Credits

    A lecture and laboratory course that introduces selected neurologic disorders, examination of the neurologic system, diagnostic criteria, etiology, epidemiology, prognosis and clinical manifestations. Emphasis will be placed on clinical manifestations and their correlating neuroanatomical structures and functions. Relevance to physical therapy practice will also be covered.

  
  •  

    PHTH 7568 - Clinical Externship II


    3 Credits

    (Previously termed Clinical Practice II) Sixty hours of clinical experience in a variety of clinical settings. Emphasis is placed on development of skills acquired during previous and concurrent semester courses.

  
  •  

    PHTH 7569 - Clinical Electrophysiology


    3 Credits

    A lecture and laboratory study of advanced concepts of electrophysiological evaluation and management techniques in physical therapy practice. The student develops skills necessary to apply and supervise safe application of electrotherapy.

  
  •  

    PHTH 7570 - Prosthetics & Orthotics


    2 Credits

    An introduction to the evaluation and management of patients requiring orthotic or prosthetic interventions. Related topics include: etiology and presentation of upper and lower extremity dysfunction, management of the diabetic foot, amputation, and the role physical therapy in an interdisciplinary orthotic/prosthetic clinic model. Emphasis is on evaluation, prescription, and pre- and post-device training; limited experiences in fabrication or splinting may be included.

  
  •  

    PHTH 7571 - Evaluation and Management of Patients with Cardiopulmonary Disorders


    2 Credits

    A course of study that builds upon material presented in Physiological Adaptation to Exercise and Nutrition. Emphasis is placed on selection and performance of appropriate tests and procedures, which meet the standards of Physical Therapy management in cardiac and pulmonary disorders.

  
  •  

    PHTH 7572 - Neuroscience II


    3 Credits

    A lecture and laboratory course that introduces the foundations of motor control and motor learning. The conceptual framework will be presented including the issues, theories, recovery of function and the framework for clinical practice as it relates to physical therapy practice will be covered.

  
  •  

    PHTH 7573 - Physical Therapy Across the Lifespan


    3 Credits

    A course of study that addresses physical therapy intervention for individuals from birth into the geriatric years. Normal and abnormal development will be presented utilizing a variety of current models including systems, ecological, and dynamic action. Assessment and management strategies appropriate to the stage of development will be presented from a systems perspective.

  
  •  

    PHTH 7574 - Manual Therapy II


    2 Credits

    A continuation of the study of principles learned in Manual Therapy I. The emphasis in this course is on techniques utilized in spinal mobilization.

  
  •  

    PHTH 7576 - PT Intervention for Selected Medical Conditions


    3 Credits

    A lecture and laboratory course which addresses evaluation and management of patients with a variety of physical problems including spinal cord injury, stroke, traumatic brain injury, and other neuromusculoskeletal disorders. Psychological aspects of disease and disability are also presented.

  
  •  

    PHTH 7577 - Research IV


    2 Credits

    This fourth of five sequential research courses emphasizes collection and interpretation of data in preparation for scholarly presentation.

  
  •  

    PHTH 7578 - Pharmacology


    2 Credits

    A study of pharmacological agents and their effects on the musculoskeletal and neuromuscular system. Particular emphasis is placed of recognition of adverse reactions and side effects of various drugs.

  
  •  

    PHTH 7579 - Wellness


    3 Credits

    Students examine various wellness models and the role played by physical therapists in coordinating wellness programs. A critical study to contemporary wellness protocols is conducted.

  
  •  

    PHTH 7580 - Evaluation and Management of Patients with Disorders of the Integumentary System


    3 Credits

    A lecture and laboratory course that examines principles of burn and wound management including skills in debridement and dressing selection and application.

  
  •  

    PHTH 7581 - Neuroscience III


    3 Credits

    A laboratory/case based course that integrates the motor control and motor learning techniques to cases pertinent to physical therapy. Specific techniques for consciousness, attention, stability, mobility and integration toward function will be presented with application to various diagnostic groups for management of tone, improvement of coordination, integration of sensorium and reflex integration.

  
  •  

    PHTH 7584 - Women’s Health


    2 Credits

    An examination of physical therapy issues related to specific concerns of women including pregnancy, post-partum conditions and urological rehabilitation.

  
  •  

    PHTH 7585 - Business Administration and Marketing


    3 Credits

    A study of health care delivery and how the physical therapist can function effectively in the healthcare marketplace in a variety of settings. Tools for the ethical marketing of a physical therapy practice are also presented.

  
  •  

    PHTH 7586 - Research V


    1 Credit

    The final segment of the research sequence where students formalize findings from their research and present both a comprehensive paper and platform or oral presentation.

  
  •  

    PHTH 7587 - Clinical Internship I


    10 Credits

    A fifteen-week block of full time clinical practice in one or more settings. The practicum is designed to provide clinical reinforcement of the curriculum content presented during the two years of study.

  
  •  

    PHTH 7588 - Clinical Internship II


    10 Credits

    A fifteen-week block of full time clinical practice in one or more settings. The practicum is designed to provide clinical reinforcement of the curriculum content presented during the two years of study and permit students to select an area of specialized interest in which to improve selected clinical skills.

  
  •  

    PHTH 7589 - Independent Study


    1-3 Credits

    (elective) This course allows students to pursue a topic related to physical therapy beyond that covered in the graduate curriculum. Satisfactory completion of the course requirement will be accomplished through individualized, self-directed study. The topic will be based on student preference and faculty approval. A faculty advisor and the student will jointly determine goals, objectives and evaluation methods. May be repeated for credit with change in topic and permission of the Department Head. (Offered in all semesters)

  
  •  

    PHTH 7590 - Educational Practice


    2 Credits

    Application of principles learned in PHTH 7583  , Educational Theory. Students gain practical experience as a teaching assistant under faculty supervision.

  
  •  

    PHTH 7591 - Therapeutic Exercise for Mobility, Function, and Performance I


    1 Credit

    This course will provide physical therapy students with the basic concepts and principles that guide the development and progression of appropriate therapeutic exercise interventions of patients and clients across the lifespan to remediate movement dysfunction.

  
  •  

    PHTH 7592 - Therapeutic Exercise for Mobility, Function, and Performance II


    1 Credit

    This course will provide physical therapy students with the basic concepts and principles that guide the development and progression of appropriate therapeutic exercise interventions of patients and clients across the lifespan to remediate movement dysfunction.


Physiology

  
  •  

    PHYSIO 6523 - Human Physiology


    4 Credits

    Lectures cover physiology of cell, tissue, organ and body systems with emphasis on physiological changes associated with selected pathological conditions. Laboratory demonstrations focus on observation and measurement of function in the body systems, using videotapes and animal experiments.


Physician Assistant

  
  •  

    PYAS 6550 - Patient Evaluation


    2 Credits

    Lecture/lab course for in-depth instruction in medical history taking. Learners will practice soliciting, organizing, and interpreting the entire medical history from patients of all ages, cultures, socioeconomic levels, and disabilities.

    Note: enrolled in Fieldwork Experience II in off campus health care and
  
  •  

    PYAS 6551 - PA Professions


    1 Credit

    An introduction to the Physician Assistant profession including the origin of the PA concept, PA profession and LSU PA program history, PA development, PA practice laws and future trends in the PA profession.

    Note: community facilities. Each student is required to purchase individual
  
  •  

    PYAS 6552 - Clinical Diagnostics


    5 Credits

    Lecture/ lab course with three components: radiologic study ordering and interpretation, ECG ordering and interpretation, and laboratory study ordering, performance, and interpretation. This course provides skills in ordering and interpreting lab values from chemistry, hematology, immunology, microbiology, parasitology, virology, genetics, and mycology testing. Basic ECG and x-ray interpretation skills are introduced in preparation for clinical externships.

    Note: additional background check , for instance. These expenses are the
  
  •  

    PYAS 6553 - Physical Diagnosis


    3 Credits

    Lecture/lab course building on skills learned in Patient Evaluation and teaching physical examination and documentation on patients of any age, disability, culture, or socioeconomic level. Hands on patient learning will occur throughout the course.

    Note: responsibility of the individual student and should be anticipated.
  
  •  

    PYAS 6554 - Pathology


    3 Credits

    Lecture based course that centers around the study of disease, its causes, mechanisms and effects on the body with emphasis on how disease manifests clinically.

    Note: malpractice insurance during this time period and possibly an
  
  •  

    PYAS 6555 - Clinical Medicine I


    4 Credits

    Lecture/lab course (part 1 of 2) that covers the principles of evaluation and management of general medical conditions in a systems-based approach. Discussions incorporate prerequisite and co-requisite knowledge of pathophysiology, patient evaluation, and diagnostic medicine in order to reach appropriate patient assessments.

  
  •  

    PYAS 6556 - Clinical Medicine II


    8 Credits

    Lecture/lab course providing a continuation of Clinical Medicine I. The principles of evaluation and management of general medical conditions are studied in a systems-based approach. Discussions incorporate prerequisite and co-requisite knowledge of pathophysiology, patient evaluation, and diagnostic medicine in order to reach appropriate patient assessments.

  
  •  

    PYAS 6557 - Pharmacology


    6 Credits

    Lecture based course that presents basic pharmacology principles with emphasis on drug classification, mechanism of action, utilization, medication selection, and side effects in the treatment of disease processes. Lectures focus on the clinical pharmacologic treatment of disease processes.

  
  •  

    PYAS 6558 - Clinical Practice Issues


    2 Credits

    Lecture based course that covers appropriate use of International Classification of Diseases (ICD) and Current Procedural Terminology (CPT) coding of patient encounters, obtaining hospital credentials and privileges, adherence to state and national laws and guidelines related to clinical practice, and professionalism.

  
  •  

    PYAS 6559 - Clinical Externship


    3 Credits

    12 clinical rotations each 4 weeks in length. Externships consist of clinical experience in a variety of clinical settings. This practicum is designed to provide clinical reinforcement of the didactic curriculum content presented during year one of the student’s education. Students are expected to integrate didactic knowledge and clinical experience in the development of clinical competencies that are expected of program graduates. Externships also provide the students with an opportunity to understand healthcare finance, medico-legal issues, professionalism, interpersonal communication, and other principles inherent in the patient-healthcare provider relationship. Students can expect clinical experience in the following disciplines: Family Medicine, Internal Medicine, Pediatrics, Prenatal Care and Gynecology, General Surgery, Emergency Medicine, Radiology and Psychiatry/Behavioral Medicine. Students will also have the opportunity to choose three different elective rotations to explore subspecialty medicine and surgery. The Physician Assistant program offers its clinical courses through affiliated hospitals that are public and private institutions located throughout the state. A complete list of these affiliations is posted on the LSUHSC legal affairs website.

    See Physician Assistant Studies Clinical Externships  for more information.

  
  •  

    PYAS 6560 - Clinical Externship


    3 Credits

    12 clinical rotations each 4 weeks in length. Externships consist of clinical experience in a variety of clinical settings. This practicum is designed to provide clinical reinforcement of the didactic curriculum content presented during year one of the student’s education. Students are expected to integrate didactic knowledge and clinical experience in the development of clinical competencies that are expected of program graduates. Externships also provide the students with an opportunity to understand healthcare finance, medico-legal issues, professionalism, interpersonal communication, and other principles inherent in the patient-healthcare provider relationship. Students can expect clinical experience in the following disciplines: Family Medicine, Internal Medicine, Pediatrics, Prenatal Care and Gynecology, General Surgery, Emergency Medicine, Radiology and Psychiatry/Behavioral Medicine. Students will also have the opportunity to choose three different elective rotations to explore subspecialty medicine and surgery. The Physician Assistant program offers its clinical courses through affiliated hospitals that are public and private institutions located throughout the state. A complete list of these affiliations is posted on the LSUHSC legal affairs website.

    See Physician Assistant Studies Clinical Externships  for more information.

  
  •  

    PYAS 6561 - Clinical Externship


    3 Credits

    12 clinical rotations each 4 weeks in length. Externships consist of clinical experience in a variety of clinical settings. This practicum is designed to provide clinical reinforcement of the didactic curriculum content presented during year one of the student’s education. Students are expected to integrate didactic knowledge and clinical experience in the development of clinical competencies that are expected of program graduates. Externships also provide the students with an opportunity to understand healthcare finance, medico-legal issues, professionalism, interpersonal communication, and other principles inherent in the patient-healthcare provider relationship. Students can expect clinical experience in the following disciplines: Family Medicine, Internal Medicine, Pediatrics, Prenatal Care and Gynecology, General Surgery, Emergency Medicine, Radiology and Psychiatry/Behavioral Medicine. Students will also have the opportunity to choose three different elective rotations to explore subspecialty medicine and surgery. The Physician Assistant program offers its clinical courses through affiliated hospitals that are public and private institutions located throughout the state. A complete list of these affiliations is posted on the LSUHSC legal affairs website.

    See Physician Assistant Studies Clinical Externships  for more information.

  
  •  

    PYAS 6562 - Research Methods I


    1 Credit

    This course is designed to increase student proficiency in searching and interpreting medical literature in preparation for the capstone project. Each learner will be assigned a mentor for the Research Methods course sequence to individually assist in research skill development.

  
  •  

    PYAS 6563 - Seminar


    1 Credit

    Summer seminar is taken the first summer of the second year of PA school. This discussion-based course meets one day each month when students return from clinical externships. Students present clinical cases, reflect on clinical experiences, and prepare for the next clinical experience.

  
  •  

    PYAS 6564 - Clinical Externship


    3 Credits

    12 clinical rotations each 4 weeks in length. Externships consist of clinical experience in a variety of clinical settings. This practicum is designed to provide clinical reinforcement of the didactic curriculum content presented during year one of the student’s education. Students are expected to integrate didactic knowledge and clinical experience in the development of clinical competencies that are expected of program graduates. Externships also provide the students with an opportunity to understand healthcare finance, medico-legal issues, professionalism, interpersonal communication, and other principles inherent in the patient-healthcare provider relationship. Students can expect clinical experience in the following disciplines: Family Medicine, Internal Medicine, Pediatrics, Prenatal Care and Gynecology, General Surgery, Emergency Medicine, Radiology and Psychiatry/Behavioral Medicine. Students will also have the opportunity to choose three different elective rotations to explore subspecialty medicine and surgery. The Physician Assistant program offers its clinical courses through affiliated hospitals that are public and private institutions located throughout the state. A complete list of these affiliations is posted on the LSUHSC legal affairs website.

    See Physician Assistant Studies Clinical Externships  for more information.

  
  •  

    PYAS 6565 - Clinical Externship


    3 Credits

    12 clinical rotations each 4 weeks in length. Externships consist of clinical experience in a variety of clinical settings. This practicum is designed to provide clinical reinforcement of the didactic curriculum content presented during year one of the student’s education. Students are expected to integrate didactic knowledge and clinical experience in the development of clinical competencies that are expected of program graduates. Externships also provide the students with an opportunity to understand healthcare finance, medico-legal issues, professionalism, interpersonal communication, and other principles inherent in the patient-healthcare provider relationship. Students can expect clinical experience in the following disciplines: Family Medicine, Internal Medicine, Pediatrics, Prenatal Care and Gynecology, General Surgery, Emergency Medicine, Radiology and Psychiatry/Behavioral Medicine. Students will also have the opportunity to choose three different elective rotations to explore subspecialty medicine and surgery. The Physician Assistant program offers its clinical courses through affiliated hospitals that are public and private institutions located throughout the state. A complete list of these affiliations is posted on the LSUHSC legal affairs website.

    See Physician Assistant Studies Clinical Externships  for more information.

  
  •  

    PYAS 6566 - Clinical Externship


    3 Credits

    12 clinical rotations each 4 weeks in length. Externships consist of clinical experience in a variety of clinical settings. This practicum is designed to provide clinical reinforcement of the didactic curriculum content presented during year one of the student’s education. Students are expected to integrate didactic knowledge and clinical experience in the development of clinical competencies that are expected of program graduates. Externships also provide the students with an opportunity to understand healthcare finance, medico-legal issues, professionalism, interpersonal communication, and other principles inherent in the patient-healthcare provider relationship. Students can expect clinical experience in the following disciplines: Family Medicine, Internal Medicine, Pediatrics, Prenatal Care and Gynecology, General Surgery, Emergency Medicine, Radiology and Psychiatry/Behavioral Medicine. Students will also have the opportunity to choose three different elective rotations to explore subspecialty medicine and surgery. The Physician Assistant program offers its clinical courses through affiliated hospitals that are public and private institutions located throughout the state. A complete list of these affiliations is posted on the LSUHSC legal affairs website.

    See Physician Assistant Studies Clinical Externships  for more information.

  
  •  

    PYAS 6567 - Clinical Externship


    3 Credits

    12 clinical rotations each 4 weeks in length. Externships consist of clinical experience in a variety of clinical settings. This practicum is designed to provide clinical reinforcement of the didactic curriculum content presented during year one of the student’s education. Students are expected to integrate didactic knowledge and clinical experience in the development of clinical competencies that are expected of program graduates. Externships also provide the students with an opportunity to understand healthcare finance, medico-legal issues, professionalism, interpersonal communication, and other principles inherent in the patient-healthcare provider relationship. Students can expect clinical experience in the following disciplines: Family Medicine, Internal Medicine, Pediatrics, Prenatal Care and Gynecology, General Surgery, Emergency Medicine, Radiology and Psychiatry/Behavioral Medicine. Students will also have the opportunity to choose three different elective rotations to explore subspecialty medicine and surgery. The Physician Assistant program offers its clinical courses through affiliated hospitals that are public and private institutions located throughout the state. A complete list of these affiliations is posted on the LSUHSC legal affairs website.

    See Physician Assistant Studies Clinical Externships  for more information.

  
  •  

    PYAS 6568 - Clinical Externship


    3 Credits

    12 clinical rotations each 4 weeks in length. Externships consist of clinical experience in a variety of clinical settings. This practicum is designed to provide clinical reinforcement of the didactic curriculum content presented during year one of the student’s education. Students are expected to integrate didactic knowledge and clinical experience in the development of clinical competencies that are expected of program graduates. Externships also provide the students with an opportunity to understand healthcare finance, medico-legal issues, professionalism, interpersonal communication, and other principles inherent in the patient-healthcare provider relationship. Students can expect clinical experience in the following disciplines: Family Medicine, Internal Medicine, Pediatrics, Prenatal Care and Gynecology, General Surgery, Emergency Medicine, Radiology and Psychiatry/Behavioral Medicine. Students will also have the opportunity to choose three different elective rotations to explore subspecialty medicine and surgery. The Physician Assistant program offers its clinical courses through affiliated hospitals that are public and private institutions located throughout the state. A complete list of these affiliations is posted on the LSUHSC legal affairs website.

    See Physician Assistant Studies Clinical Externships  for more information.

  
  •  

    PYAS 6569 - Seminar


    2 Credits

    One seminar course is taken each semester of the clinical (second) year of PA school. This discussion-based course meets one day each month when students return from clinical externships. Students present clinical cases, reflect on clinical experiences, and prepare for the next clinical experience.

  
  •  

    PYAS 6570 - Research Methods II


    2 Credits.

    This course directs the topic selection, approval, and initial literature search for the Capstone project.

  
  •  

    PYAS 6571 - Clinical Externship


    3 Credits

    12 clinical rotations each 4 weeks in length. Externships consist of clinical experience in a variety of clinical settings. This practicum is designed to provide clinical reinforcement of the didactic curriculum content presented during year one of the student’s education. Students are expected to integrate didactic knowledge and clinical experience in the development of clinical competencies that are expected of program graduates. Externships also provide the students with an opportunity to understand healthcare finance, medico-legal issues, professionalism, interpersonal communication, and other principles inherent in the patient-healthcare provider relationship. Students can expect clinical experience in the following disciplines: Family Medicine, Internal Medicine, Pediatrics, Prenatal Care and Gynecology, General Surgery, Emergency Medicine, Radiology and Psychiatry/Behavioral Medicine. Students will also have the opportunity to choose three different elective rotations to explore subspecialty medicine and surgery. The Physician Assistant program offers its clinical courses through affiliated hospitals that are public and private institutions located throughout the state. A complete list of these affiliations is posted on the LSUHSC legal affairs website.

    See Physician Assistant Studies Clinical Externships  for more information.

  
  •  

    PYAS 6572 - Clinical Externship


    3 Credits

    12 clinical rotations each 4 weeks in length. Externships consist of clinical experience in a variety of clinical settings. This practicum is designed to provide clinical reinforcement of the didactic curriculum content presented during year one of the student’s education. Students are expected to integrate didactic knowledge and clinical experience in the development of clinical competencies that are expected of program graduates. Externships also provide the students with an opportunity to understand healthcare finance, medico-legal issues, professionalism, interpersonal communication, and other principles inherent in the patient-healthcare provider relationship. Students can expect clinical experience in the following disciplines: Family Medicine, Internal Medicine, Pediatrics, Prenatal Care and Gynecology, General Surgery, Emergency Medicine, Radiology and Psychiatry/Behavioral Medicine. Students will also have the opportunity to choose three different elective rotations to explore subspecialty medicine and surgery. The Physician Assistant program offers its clinical courses through affiliated hospitals that are public and private institutions located throughout the state. A complete list of these affiliations is posted on the LSUHSC legal affairs website.

    See Physician Assistant Studies Clinical Externships  for more information.

  
  •  

    PYAS 6573 - Clinical Externship


    3 Credits

    12 clinical rotations each 4 weeks in length. Externships consist of clinical experience in a variety of clinical settings. This practicum is designed to provide clinical reinforcement of the didactic curriculum content presented during year one of the student’s education. Students are expected to integrate didactic knowledge and clinical experience in the development of clinical competencies that are expected of program graduates. Externships also provide the students with an opportunity to understand healthcare finance, medico-legal issues, professionalism, interpersonal communication, and other principles inherent in the patient-healthcare provider relationship. Students can expect clinical experience in the following disciplines: Family Medicine, Internal Medicine, Pediatrics, Prenatal Care and Gynecology, General Surgery, Emergency Medicine, Radiology and Psychiatry/Behavioral Medicine. Students will also have the opportunity to choose three different elective rotations to explore subspecialty medicine and surgery. The Physician Assistant program offers its clinical courses through affiliated hospitals that are public and private institutions located throughout the state. A complete list of these affiliations is posted on the LSUHSC legal affairs website.

    See Physician Assistant Studies Clinical Externships  for more information.

  
  •  

    PYAS 6574 - Clinical Externship


    3 Credits

    12 clinical rotations each 4 weeks in length. Externships consist of clinical experience in a variety of clinical settings. This practicum is designed to provide clinical reinforcement of the didactic curriculum content presented during year one of the student’s education. Students are expected to integrate didactic knowledge and clinical experience in the development of clinical competencies that are expected of program graduates. Externships also provide the students with an opportunity to understand healthcare finance, medico-legal issues, professionalism, interpersonal communication, and other principles inherent in the patient-healthcare provider relationship. Students can expect clinical experience in the following disciplines: Family Medicine, Internal Medicine, Pediatrics, Prenatal Care and Gynecology, General Surgery, Emergency Medicine, Radiology and Psychiatry/Behavioral Medicine. Students will also have the opportunity to choose three different elective rotations to explore subspecialty medicine and surgery. The Physician Assistant program offers its clinical courses through affiliated hospitals that are public and private institutions located throughout the state. A complete list of these affiliations is posted on the LSUHSC legal affairs website.

    See Physician Assistant Studies Clinical Externships  for more information.

  
  •  

    PYAS 6575 - Clinical Ethics


    1 Credit

    This is an in-depth discussion-based course covering medical ethical principles and issues.

  
  •  

    PYAS 6576 - Seminar


    2 Credits

    One seminar course is taken each semester of the clinical (second) year of PA school. This discussion-based course meets one day each month when students return from clinical externships. Students present clinical cases, reflect on clinical experiences, and prepare for the next clinical experience.

  
  •  

    PYAS 6577 - Research Methods III


    2 Credits

    In this course learners will continue their capstone project by analyzing literature and formulating conclusions and recommendations for evidence-based practice in the evaluation and management of the disease studied.

  
  •  

    PYAS 6578 - Master’s Project


    3 Credits

    This course provides opportunity for completion of the capstone project that was initiated in Research Methods I and II. The conclusion of the project will evaluate the sum of the literature to make recommendations regarding the application and utility of the information in an evidence-based practice. The project must be presented to the class and faculty orally and must be submitted in a written form of publishable quality.

  
  •  

    PYAS 6579 - Preceptorship


    6 Credits

    A clinical externship intended to be completed in the practice setting of a prospective physician employer. The preceptorship may be fulfilled in a discipline of the student’s choosing after approval by the program. Duties may include extended clinical care hours, emergency and hospital call, and community responsibilities as deemed appropriate by the supervising physician.

  
  •  

    PYAS 6580 - Independent Study


    1-3 Credits

    An elective independent study course in which the physician assistant student will pursue a topic relevant to their current course of study. Students are assigned a faculty mentor to work with on the study


Public Health

  
  •  

    PUBH 701 - Introduction to Public Health and Health Disparities


    3 Credits

    An introduction to the history of public health as well as the scope of services, politics, and budget of health care agencies at the federal, state, and local levels; evaluate the value and the implications of diversity (racial, ethnic, cultural, economic, and social) and the importance of cultural competency in addressing public health issues.

  
  •  

    PUBH 702 - Public Health Law and Ethics


    3 Credits

    An examination of both the legal powers and ethical perspectives and duties of the state that exist to assure the conditions for people to be healthy and the limits on that power to constrain the autonomy privacy, liberty, propriety, or other legally protected interests of individuals.

  
  •  

    PUBH 703 - Public Health Leadership


    3 Credits

    A review of concepts and theories of leadership, to present challenges from public health practices and research, and to discover personal leadership attributes. The content will include leadership theory as it relates to the person, organization, communities, and research.

  
  •  

    PUBH 704 - Biology and Public Health


    3 Credits

    A review of current research and theory from molecular biology that has important implications for the current and future approach to public health. Provides understanding of the potential applications of genetic engineering to their health specialties.

  
  •  

    PUBH 705 - Principles of Health Promotion and Intervention


    3 Credits

    An overview of current issues and research associated with health promotion in the community, including the workplace and focusing on implementation and evaluation of the health promotion programs.

  
  •  

    PUBH 706 - Public Health Nutrition


    3 Credits

    An introduction to the basic nutritional needs for public health programs with examination of the role of diet, health, and disease throughout the population, including weight control and fitness issues.

  
  •  

    PUBH 707 - Program Planning and Evaluation


    3 Credits

    A comprehensive study and application of established models for planning, implementing, and evaluating small and large scale health programs. Includes preparation to develop and plan with a particular emphasis on evaluation of community-based public health programs.

  
  •  

    PUBH 708 - Principles of Epidemiology


    3 Credits

    An introduction to the skills needed by public health professionals to critically interpret the epidemiologic literature. Discusses measures of frequency and association, introduce the design and validity of epidemiologic research, and give an overview of data analysis.

  
  •  

    PUBH 709 - Principles of Biostatistics


    3 Credits

    A focus on statistical analysis in public health and health services administration. Topics include distributions, tests of significance and confidence levels, sample situations with special attention to those occurring in health education, and behavioral sciences.

  
  •  

    PUBH 710 - Environmental Health


    3 Credits

    A review of environmental risk factors of disease. Topics include community air and water pollution, occupational health, hazardous waste, pesticides and food radiation protection including approaches to assessing, controlling, and preventing these hazards.

  
  •  

    PUBH 711 - Public Health Seminar


    0 Credits

    This course is designed to provide an opportunity for students to be exposed to current topics in public health practice and research.

  
  •  

    PUBH 712 - Social and Behavioral Sciences in Public Health


    3 Credits

    This course will provide the student with concepts of community health education, health promotion and disease prevention; their association with social, behavioral, and physical sciences in relation to health maintenance, optimal health, disease prevention.

  
  •  

    PUBH 713 - Health Services Administration, Health Management, and Policy


    3 Credits

    A review of health policy and management issues and their impact on organizing, financing, and delivery of public health and medical delivery systems.

  
  •  

    PUBH 714 - Empowerment through Community Health Sciences


    3 credits

    An introduction to the theory and practice of community organizations, including models and strategies of community organization and their application to health problems and health policy.

  
  •  

    PUBH 717 - Public Health Strategic Planning


    3 Credits

    A review of strategic planning for public health program delivery; exploring such topics as vision and mission, program design, including goals and objectives, basic assumptions, and program evaluations including design of outcome measurements and benchmarking.

  
  •  

    PUBH 718 - International Health


    3 Credits

    An introduction to public health theory and practice in the context of developing countries. Topics include public health methods for analyzing the causes and patterns of disease in populations and the types of health concerns in developing countries.

  
  •  

    PUBH 719 - Health and Diseases Across Ages


    3 Credits

    An examination of the major issues related to the delivery of health care services to persons with disabilities; acute and chronic conditions of all ages.

  
  •  

    PUBH 720 - Geographic Information Systems (GIS) in Public Health


    3 credits

    The application of GIS in their public health career. Topics covered include mapping, development of geographical datasets, and data analysis from application of GIS in different disciplines of public health.

  
  •  

    PUBH 721 - Research Methods


    3 Credits

    An overview of qualitative and quantitative research methods and techniques used in designing and conducting health research of community-based public health programs.

  
  •  

    PUBH 780 - Public Health Practicum


    3 Credits

    Supervised work experience in a public health-practice setting by participation in a structured practicum experience. Students are required to complete 200 hours of practicum experience, produce a written report of the experience, and produce a structured report that describes, analyzes, and critiques the practicum experience.

  
  •  

    PUBH 781 - Capstone


    3 Credits

    A written research project under the supervision of a faculty committee. The project is written in traditional academic style or in a journal manuscript format.

  
  •  

    PUBH 798 - Thesis I


    3 Credits

    Provides students with knowledge and skills to develop research questions, conduct literature review, plan for data collection, and develop a thesis proposal.

  
  •  

    PUBH 799 - Thesis II


    3 Credits

    Enables students to apply methods of research to the study of Public Health issues culminating in a monograph embodying research.


Pathology

  
  •  

    ELECT EPATH - Anatomic and Clinical Pathology Elective


    ELECTIVE DIRECTORS: Diana Veillon, M.D. and Mingxia Shi, M.D. ADMINISTRATIVE CONTACT: Lisa LaChance
    DURATION OF ELECTIVE: 4 Weeks Room 2-319; Ext. 5-7822; llacha@lsuhsc.edu
    LOCATION OF ELECTIVE: 2nd Floor, Pathology Dept.
    MAXIMUM NUMBER OF STUDENTS: 1 VISITING STUDENTS: Application Permitted
    ELECTIVE OFFERED DURING BLOCKS: All except block 1
    COURSE NUMBER: EPATH * Dropping/adding/changing - Approval required. Contact Ms. LaChance
    Visiting Students: Application Permitted

    1 credit

    Department Approval Required for Dropping/Changing/or Adding

     

    DESCRIPTION

     The student participates in the following: dissection, gross description, microscopic description, and diagnosis of surgical pathology specimens; frozen section procedures; intradepartmental subspecialty and educational conferences; autopsies, and rotations through the Clinical Pathology laboratory. Pathology textbooks and other literature are available in the department for student use. The student attends all conferences in the pathology department and documents attendance on a log sheet. Clinical correlation with pathological findings is stressed. Time is made available for the student to review areas of special interest in pathology. Reading assignments will be suggested after discussion with the student.

     

     

    1. GOAL: Become familiar with the different subspecialties of Pathology (AP & CP)

      OBJECTIVES:

    a. Attendance at morning/afternoon sign-out, didactic lectures, and journal/research club, and other conferences.

    b. Participation in all activities of surgical pathology including frozen sections, specimen examination and reporting, conferences, and autopsies.

    c. Rotation through and completion of tasks in each of the areas of Clinical Pathology as listed on the log sheet

    d. Daily communication with the Co-Directors

     

    2. GOAL: Gain an understanding of the pathologist’s role in patient care and management decision making.

    OBJECTIVES:

    a. Observation of intra-operative consultation, fine-needle aspiration, blood transfusion and plasmapheresis to understand how specimens are obtained, preserved, examined, processed, diagnosed, and reported.

    b. Attendance at tumor board conferences to understand expected components of a surgical pathology report and acceptable turn-around times for patient reports.

    c. Completion of the log sheet as each case type is observed.

     

    3. GOAL: Gain competency in gross examination and processing of routine specimens and identify common pathologic lesions.

    OBJECTIVES:

    a. Observation of gross examination of different organs at intra-operative consultation, as well as in the gross room.

    b. Identification of various tissues and organ structures.

    c. Attendance at daily slide review with senior resident.

    d. Attendance at surgical microscopic sign-out on assigned days.

    e. Completion of the log sheet as each case type is observed.

     

    4. GOAL: Understand the three phases of laboratory diagnostics (i.e., pre-analytical, analytical, post- analytical).

    OBJECTIVES:

    a. Interpretation of laboratory test results in microbiology, hematology, chemistry, and blood bank.

    b. Daily communication with the Co-Directors.

     

     

    5. GOAL: Become familiar with and be able to perform common procedures (e.g. H&E & DQ staining) OBJECTIVES:

    a. Observation and participation in staining of slides during intra-operative consultations and fine-needle aspirations.

    b. Attendance in the histology laboratory, learning the basics of tissue processing and slide preparation

    c. Attendance in the microbiology laboratory, learning how to process and read Gram stains.

    d. Completion of the log sheet as each task is performed.

     

    6. GOAL: Students will demonstrate their knowledge of disease pathophysiology and the role of pathology in patient care

    OBJECTIVES:

    a. Presentation to the AP/CP faculty and residents, based on an interesting case or topic encountered during their LSU experience

     

    RECOMMENDED READING:

    1. A Pathology Textbook: Pathology Rubin, Farber

    or Robbins Pathologic Basis of Disease, Robbins, Cotran, Kumar

    2. The Handbook of Clinical Pathology, (Department Copy)

    3. The Art of Sciences of Pathology, DeMay (Department Copy)

     

    SCHEDULE: The 4-week rotation includes 12 days in AP (frozen, gross, microscopy, sign-out, cytopathology, and forensics) and 8 days in CP (Blood bank, Hematology, Chemistry, Point-of-Care, Molecular, Microbiology). First day: report to Dr. Veillon (room 2-320 at 8:30 a.m. and a schedule will be provided at that time. Meet with either director before leaving (5:00 p.m.) on a daily basis.

    ATTENDANCE: To accommodate students’ travel needs for post-graduate interviews, during the timeframe from October 1st through January 30th, 1 excused absence will be allowed per week of the rotation. A copy of the student’s travel itinerary must be submitted to the course directors in order to be considered an excused absence. During the remainder of the academic year, only 2 excused absences will be allowed during this rotation. Excused absences over the allowed limit, and all unexcused absences must be made up in order to receive credit for the rotation. The requirements for making up lost time will be assigned at the discretion of the director.

    ASSESSMENT: Comprised of attendance, daily completion of assignments/rotation requirements, periodic question and answer sessions with staff, and the final presentation.

     

    APPROVAL: For all internal and external applicants, a letter of intent and CV must be sent to Ms. LaChance for review prior to scheduling a rotation.

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    HOURS PER WEEK

    CONF ___5___HRS WARD______ HRS     LAB 10 HRS      LIBRARY ___10___ HRS

    OR ______HRS  CLINIC______ HRS      LECTURE___5___ HRS     READING___10___ HRS

    TOTAL NUMBER OF HOURS PER WEEK ____40______

     

    All

    Pass/Fail

  
  •  

    PATH 300 - Pathology


    Diana Veillon, M.D., Clinical Pathology, Clerkship Director

    2 credit hours

    This two week clerkship is designed to familiarize students with anatomic and clinical pathology, as well as the subspecialties, to include the following: Blood Bank, Hematopathology, Molecular Pathology, Cytopathology, and Forensic/Autopsy Pathology. By attending sign out, lectures and conferences, observing gross examination of organs, autopsies, fine needle aspirations, blood transfusion and plasmapheresis, as well as learning H & E and Diff-Quik Staining, students will gain some understanding of the multi-faceted work of pathologists. Students are expected to prepare a final presentation and /or microscopic examination at the end of their clerkship.


Pediatrics

  
  •  

    ELECT EPEDB - Pediatric Gastroenterology


    ELECTIVE DIRECTOR(S): Adrian Chapa-Rodriguez, M.D. PHONE: 318.675.4942
    DURATION OF ELECTIVE: 4 Weeks or 2 weeks
    LOCATION OF ELECTIVE: LSU Health Sciences Center
    MAXIMUM NUMBER OF STUDENTS: 1
    ELECTIVE OFFERED DURING BLOCKS: all CONTACT: Cathy Eddington, 675-4942/ 318.349.4865
    COURSE CODE: EPEDB ( 4 week code) EPEDB2 (2 week code)

    1 credit

    Goals:

    1. Focusing histories, physicals, and oral and written communication appropriately.
    2. Sharing information effectively with a patient and family.
    3. Prioritizing and organizing work effectively.
    4. Continuing to think about and re-assess the patient during the course of their disease.
    5. Functioning as a “team player” with residents, attendings, nurses, ancillary staff and all others involved in the care of the patient.

    Objectives:

    Patient Care

    • Independently collect focused and comprehensive, developmentally appropriate patient histories and physical examinations
    • Develop a prioritized and inclusive problem list
    • Summarize interval patient information and rationale for ongoing clinical management
    • Suggest appropriate diagnostic tests for the patient’s chief complaint and other medical problems

    Medical Knowledge

    • Identify criteria for admission and discharge from the hospital
    • Describe the signs and symptoms that suggest deterioration or improvement of a patient’s clinical condition
    • List drugs of choice and rationale for their use in common pediatric illnesses
    • Identify contraindications to therapeutic drug use in children of different ages and/or diagnoses
    • Calculate fluid and electrolyte requirements for children based on weight, caloric expenditure, diagnosis, and fluid status

    Interpersonal and Communication Skills

    • Communicate effectively with patients and families across a broad range of socioeconomic and cultural backgrounds
    • Provide education and patient instructions to patients and families, using written or visual methods, taking into account their health literacy level
    • Write organized, appropriately focused, and accurate patient notes

    Professionalism

    • Demonstrate personal accountability, integrity, compassion, respect, altruism, and empathy when interacting with all members of the health care team, patients and their families, in order to provide the best patient care
    • Demonstrate punctuality and ability to complete patient care tasks efficiently

    Practice-Based Learning and Improvement

    • Demonstrate self-directed learning in daily practice
      • Identify strengths, deficiencies, and limits in one’s knowledge and clinical skills through self evaluation
      • Develop a plan for improvement, perform appropriate learning activities, solicit and incorporate feedback
    • Demonstrate evidence-based clinical practice
      • Access appropriate resources to answer clinical questions
      • Critically appraise relevant literature and incorporate it into patient care

    Systems-Based Practice

    • Demonstrate the appropriate utilization of consultants, including social workers, nutritionist, physical therapists, etc.

     

     

     

     

     

     

    SPECIFIC DUTIES OF SENIOR STUDENTS

     

    Students  will  interview  and  see  all  patients  with  gastrointestinal  or  liver  disease  on  the  wards and in the nursery. They will attend GI subspecialty clinic, meetings and all conferences relating to Gastrointestinal Diseases. Students will spend time reading and discussing what was read with the course director.

     

    READING ASSIGNMENTS

     

    To be assigned. There are several pediatric GI texts kept in the division office.

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    HOURS PER WEEK

    CONF      6-10      HRS                              WARD 3-5 HRS                                          LAB                       HRS             LIBRARY  5                        HRS OR     HRS                     CLINIC 10-15                            HRS            LECTURE 5        HRS     READING     _ _ _HRS

    TOTAL NUMBER OF HOURS PER WEEK:     30 - 40                           

     

    All

    Pass/Fail

  
  •  

    ELECT EPEDC - Pediatric Hematology/Oncology


    ELECTIVE DIRECTOR(S): Majed Jeroudi, M.D.
    DURATION OF ELECTIVE: 4 Weeks & 2 weeks
    LOCATION OF ELECTIVE: LSU Health Sciences Center
    MAXIMUM NUMBER OF STUDENTS: 1 MINIMUM NUMBER OF STUDENTS: 1
    ELECTIVE OFFERED DURING BLOCKS: All except block 6
    COURSE CODE: EPEDC (4 weeks) EPEDC2 (2 weeks) CONTACT: Dr. Majed Jeroudi 318.626.2001

    1 credit

    Goals:

    1. Focusing histories, physicals, and oral and written communication appropriately.
    2. Sharing information effectively with a patient and family.
    3. Prioritizing and organizing work effectively.
    4. Continuing to think about and re-assess the patient during the course of their disease.
    5. Functioning as a “team player” with residents, attendings, nurses, ancillary staff and all others involved in the care of the patient.

    Objectives:

    Patient Care

    • Independently collect focused and comprehensive, developmentally appropriate patient histories and physical examinations.
    • Develop a prioritized and inclusive problem list.
    • Summarize interval patient information and rationale for ongoing clinical management.
    • Suggest appropriate diagnostic tests for the patient’s chief complaint and other medical problems.

    Medical Knowledge

    • Identify criteria for admission and discharge from the hospital.
    • Describe the signs and symptoms that suggest deterioration or improvement of a patient’s clinical condition.
    • List drugs of choice and rationale for their use in common pediatric illnesses.
    • Identify contraindications to therapeutic drug use in children of different ages and/or diagnoses.
    • Calculate fluid and electrolyte requirements for children based on weight, caloric expenditure, diagnosis, and fluid status.

    Interpersonal and Communication Skills

    • Communicate effectively with patients and families across a broad range of socioeconomic and cultural backgrounds.
    • Provide education and patient instructions to patients and families, using written or visual methods, taking into account their health literacy level.
    • Write organized, appropriately focused, and accurate patient notes.

    Professionalism

    • Demonstrate personal accountability, integrity, compassion, respect, altruism, and empathy when interacting with all members of the health care team, patients and their families, in order to provide the best patient care.
    • Demonstrate punctuality and ability to complete patient care tasks efficiently.

    Practice-Based Learning and Improvement

    • Demonstrate self-directed learning in daily practice
      • Identify strengths, deficiencies, and limits in one’s knowledge and clinical skills through self evaluation
      • Develop a plan for improvement, perform appropriate learning activities, solicit and incorporate feedback
    • Demonstrate evidence-based clinical practice
      • Access appropriate resources to answer clinical questions
      • Critically appraise relevant literature and incorporate itinto patient care

    Systems-Based Practice

    • Demonstrate the appropriate utilization of consultants, including social workers, nutritionist, physical therapists, etc.

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    SPECIFIC DUTIES OF SENIOR STUDENTS

     

    • See new consults and present on rounds.

    • Attend pediatric hematology/oncology clinics.

    • Attend scheduled lectures/conferences in general pediatrics and pediatric hematology/oncology.

    • Case based learning.

    • Prepare a written review on 1 topic in pediatric hematology/oncology to be completed by the end of the rotation

     

     

     

     

    READING ASSIGNMENTS

     

    From texts provided by elective director or through literature review on topics relating to patients seen during the rotation.

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    HOURS PER WEEK

    CONF      5     HRS          WARD   5            HRS        LAB                     HRS        LIBRARY    5     HRS

    OR                HRS         CLINIC     20          HRS        LECTURE       2        HRS     READING    __HRS

    TOTAL NUMBER OF HOURS PER WEEK:    35     

    All

    Pass/Fail

  
  •  

    ELECT EPEDD - Pediatric Endocrinology


    ELECTIVE DIRECTOR(S): Neslihan Gungor, M.D. PHONE: 318.675.6070
    DURATION OF ELECTIVE: 4 Weeks or 2 weeks
    LOCATION OF ELECTIVE: 4-312
    MAXIMUM NUMBER OF STUDENTS: 1
    ELECTIVE OFFERED DURING BLOCKS: All
    COURSE CODE: EPEDD (4 week code) EPEDD2 (2 week code) Non-LSUHSC students: No

    1 credit

    Goals:

    1. Focusing histories, physicals, and oral and written communication appropriately.
    2. Sharing information effectively with a patient and family.
    3. Prioritizing and organizing work effectively.
    4. Continuing to think about and re-assess the patient during the course of their disease.
    5. Functioning as a “team player” with residents, attendings, nurses, ancillary staff and all others involved in the care of the patient.

    Objectives:

    Patient Care

    • Independently collect focused and comprehensive, developmentally appropriate patient histories and physical examinations.
    • Develop a prioritized and inclusive problem list.
    • Summarize interval patient information and rationale for ongoing clinical management.
    • Suggest appropriate diagnostic tests for the patient’s chief complaint and other medical problems.

    Medical Knowledge

    • Identify criteria for admission and discharge from the hospital.
    • Describe the signs and symptoms that suggest deterioration or improvement of a patient’s clinical condition.
    • List drugs of choice and rationale for their use in common pediatric illnesses.
    • Identify contraindications to therapeutic drug use in children of different ages and/or diagnoses.
    • Calculate fluid and electrolyte requirements for children based on weight, caloric expenditure, diagnosis, and fluid status.

    Interpersonal and Communication Skills

    • Communicate effectively with patients and families across a broad range of socioeconomic and cultural backgrounds.
    • Provide education and patient instructions to patients and families, using written or visual methods, taking into account their health literacy level.
    • Write organized, appropriately focused, and accurate patient notes.

    Professionalism

    • Demonstrate personal accountability, integrity, compassion, respect, altruism, and empathy when interacting with all members of the health care team, patients and their families, in order to provide the best patient care
    • Demonstrate punctuality and ability to complete patient care tasks efficiently.

    Practice-Based Learning and Improvement

    • Demonstrate self-directed learning in daily practice
      • Identify strengths, deficiencies, and limits in one’s knowledge and clinical skills through self evaluation
      • Develop a plan for improvement, perform appropriate learning activities, solicit and incorporate feedback
    • Demonstrate evidence-based clinical practice
      • Access appropriate resources to answer clinical questions
      • Critically appraise relevant literature and incorporate it into patient care

    Systems-Based Practice

    • Demonstrate the appropriate utilization of consultants, including social workers, nutritionist, physical therapists, etc.

     

     

     

     

     

    SPECIFIC DUTIES OF SENIOR STUDENTS

     

    • Attend clinics and conferences.

    • Write notes on patients seen.

    • See consult patients.

     

     

     

     

    READING ASSIGNMENTS

     

          Individualized to student needs.

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    HOURS PER WEEK

    CONF      4-6     HRS          WARD     1-3           HRS        LAB             15          HRS        LIBRARY         HRS

    OR                HRS         CLINIC      16-20          HRS        LECTURE               HRS     READING    _10__HRS

    TOTAL NUMBER OF HOURS PER WEEK:     46-54     

    All

    Pass/Fail

  
  •  

    ELECT EPEDE - Neonatal Intensive Care


    Director: Nitin Walyat MD (nwalya@lsuhsc.edu)
    Duration: 2 or 4 weeks
    Location: NICU
    Minimum/Maximum # of students: 1
    Offered during blocks: All except block 6
    Course code: EPEDE (4 weeks) EPEDE2 (2 weeks)

    .5-1 credit

     

     

    Goals

    Understand the principles of managing neonates with serious illnesses in particular the initial stabilization of the infant

     

    Objectives

    At the end of the elective, the student should demonstrate proficiency in or has observed the following on at least 2 neonates with different problems and admitted to NICU:

    1.        Patient care

    a.        Attended & or actively participated in the resuscitation and initial stabilization of babies at or post delivery, specifically to establish and maintain airway and respiratory support and thermal neutral environment.

    b.        Obtain focused histories, physical examination, and written and oral communication appropriate to the infant’s condition.

    c.        Develop a prioritized and inclusive problem list.

    d.        Suggest appropriate diagnostic tests for the patient’s chief complaint and other problems.

    e.        Summarize interval patient information and rationale for ongoing clinical management.

    f.         Continuing to think about and re-assess the patient during the course of their disease.

    2.        Medical knowledge

    a.        Identify criteria for admission and discharge from NICU.

    b.        Describe the signs and symptoms that suggest deterioration or improvement of a patient’s clinical condition.

    c.        List drugs of choice and rationale for their use in common illnesses in patients admitted to NICU.

    d.        Identify contraindications to therapeutic drug use in children of different ages and/or diagnoses.

    e.        Calculate fluid and nutrition requirements for neonates based on weight, diagnosis, and clinical status.

    3.        Interpersonal and Communication Skills

    a.        Communicate effectively with families across a broad range of socioeconomic and cultural backgrounds.

    b.        Provide education and instructions to families, using written or visual methods, taking into account their health literacy level.

    c.        Write organized, appropriately focused, and accurate patient notes.

    4.        Professionalism

    a.        Demonstrate personal accountability, integrity, compassion, respect, altruism, and empathy when interacting with all members of the health care team, patients and their families, in order to provide the best patient care.

    b.        Demonstrate punctuality and ability to complete patient care tasks efficiently.

    5.        Practice-Based Learning and Improvement

    a.        Demonstrate self-directed learning in daily practice.

    b.        Identify strengths, deficiencies, and limits in one’s knowledge and clinical skills through self evaluation.

    c.        Develop a plan for improvement, perform appropriate learning activities, solicit and incorporate feedback.

    d.        Demonstrate evidence-based clinical practice

                                                                   i.      Access appropriate resources to answer clinical questions.

                                                                  ii.      Critically appraise relevant literature and incorporate it into patient care.

     

     

     

    6.        Systems-Based Practice

    a.        Demonstrate the appropriate utilization of consultants, including social workers, nutritionist, physical therapists, etc.

    b.        Functioning as a “team player” with residents, attendings, nurses, ancillary staff and all others involved in the care of the patient.

     

    Specific duties of the senior student

    ·         First week, the student will be oriented to the Neonatal ICU by the Attending or designee.   The student is expected to attend teaching rounds, all educational sessions for neonatology, observe and assist as appropriate in resuscitation and other procedures.  S/he will be encouraged to follow a patient along with the attending Neonatologist or his/her designee.

    ·         Students are assigned patient(s) according to their capabilities and residency goals. They have to follow these patients daily under the direct supervision of a Neonatology Faculty.

    ·         Undertake procedures under the direct supervision of a Neonatal Fellow, Senior Pediatric Resident or NNP as assigned by Faculty.

     

    Reading assignments

    Handouts which cover specific areas are given prior to the rotation.  The student is recommended to take the Neonatal Resuscitation Program provider course before the elective if possible.

     

    Hours/week

    Conference 3h, Ward include OR or L&D for deliveries 30h, Library 3h, Lecture 1h, Reading 7h, Lab/Clinic NA

     

    Total number of hours/week: 44   

     

    All

    Pass/Fail

  
  •  

    ELECT EPEDH - Pediatric Cardiology


    ELECTIVE DIRECTOR(S): Ernest Kiel, M.D.
    DURATION OF ELECTIVE: 4 Weeks
    LOCATION OF ELECTIVE: LSU Health-Shreveport
    MAXIMUM NUMBER OF STUDENTS: 2
    ELECTIVE OFFERED DURING BLOCKS: All except block 1
    CONTACTS: Tammie Busby 318.675.7263
    COURSE CODE: EPEDH Room 505, Administration Bldg.
    Non LSU students: Will accept senior students from accredited US medical schools on a case basis if room available.

    Must have permission before registering for elective

    1 credit

    Must have permission before registering for elective.  

                                                               

    Goals:

    1. Perform history, physical examination, as well as oral and written presentations appropriate for pediatric cardiology
    2. Develop appropriate communication and ability to interact with patients, families, and peers
    3. Prioritize and organize work effectively
    4. Apply ancillary studies appropriately to patient care and be able to reassess the problem after applying studies with the clinical presentation
    5. Exhibit professionalism in patient and colleague interaction. Be a role model for peers.
    6. Develop efficient interaction as a “team player” and support the clinical service

     

    Objectives:

    Patient Care

    1) Become familiar with the basic cardiac history and physical examination in children and how to differentiate functional from pathologic murmurs

    2) Learn to recognized the components of a normal ECG and common ECG and rhythm abnormalities; be able to approach the CXR in evaluation of pediatric heart evaluation; be exposed to the basic utilization of echocardiography and doppler evaluation of the heart.

    3) Understand the appropriate testing to support the clinical problem and apply appropriately

    4) Develop basic evidence based treatment and follow up protocols for specific cardiac disease

    Medical Knowledge

    1) Familiarize the senior student with common problems seen in pediatric cardiology

    2) Learn the common congenital and acquired cardiac lesions presenting in pediatrics

    3) Develop basic understanding of cardiac physiology and hemodynamics particularly as applied to congenital heart disease

    4) Learn the basics of therapy for congestive heart failure, arrhythmias, acquired cardiac conditions and the management of common congenital heart defects

    Interpersonal and Communication Skills

    1. Communicate effectively with patients and families at the appropriate level for their background and acuity of illness
    2. Communicate in a comfortable and reassuring manner, alleviating concern and anxiety as possible
    3. Organize and clearly present patient notes at a level compatible with complexity and care
    4. Provide basic level summary and education to patients and families regarding the cardiac problem

    Professionalism

    1. Be timely and dependable in duties on the cardiology rotation
    2. Exhibit honesty , respect, compassion, accountability, and integrity in interacting with the patients/families, the cardiology team, other professionals, and ancillary personnel
    3. Be a role model for the developing physician and their peers

    Practice-Based Learning and Improvement

    1. Demonstrate self-directed learning habits - regular reading and review of cardiology topics; interact at an appropriate level for rounds and discussions; develop presentations on topics for the team; incorporate feedback in a system to resolve deficiencies and improve self
    2. Assess resources that utilize evidence based practices to enhance patient care. Be appropriately critical of controversial evaluation and care recommendations.

    Systems-Based Practice

    1. Develop appropriate utilization of ancillary support testing, consultation, and referral for services such as specialty care, social work, OT/PT, nutrition, and respiratory therapy

     

    SPECIFIC DUTIES OF SENIOR STUDENTS

     

    1) Attend all pediatric cardiology clinics (M,T, Th, F)

    2) Answer pediatric cardiology consultations with the attending and provide continuity of follow up

    3) Reading of ECG’s, holter evaluations, echocardiogram and Doppler studies with the attending

               4) Attend selected consultations in off site hospitals

               5) Attend exercise tests and other non-invasive testing as directed

    6) Attend morning report, pediatric grand rounds, and pediatric conferences as available

    7) Present topic review and literature search as requested

    8) Sit in on didactic lectures on variety of subjects during rotation

    9) Interact and share workload with other students and pediatric residents on rotation

     

     

    READING ASSIGNMENTS

     

    Park, MK The Pediatric Cardiology handbook. (provided) Park, MK How to Read Pediatric ECG’s

    Driscoll, DJ  Fundamentals of Pediatric Cardiology

    Appropriate sections of Nelson’s Essentials of Pediatrics

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    Estimated Hours/Week:  32-44  hrs

    Conf:  4-6 hrs                                          Clinic:  12-16 hrs                     Ward/Consults:  3-5 hrs

    Studies review (ECG’s etc): 4-5 hrs                                     Cardiac lectures:  6-8 hrs       

     

    All

    Pass/Fail

  
  •  

    ELECT EPEDK - Introduction to Child Protection Medicine


    ELECTIVE DIRECTOR(S): Sheila Farrell, M.D. PHONE: 318.681-7676
    DURATION OF ELECTIVE: 4 Weeks CONTACT: Dr. Rodriguez
    LOCATION OF ELECTIVE: Cara Center 1700 Buckner Square Ste 100
    MAXIMUM NUMBER OF STUDENTS: 1 MINIMUM NUMBER OF STUDENTS:
    ELECTIVE OFFERED DURING BLOCKS: All except blocks 5,6,7
    COURSE CODE: EPEDK
    Non LSU students: No

    1 credit

    Goals:

    1. Focusing histories, physicals, and oral and written communication appropriately.
    2. Sharing information effectively with a patient and family.
    3. Prioritizing and organizing work effectively.
    4. Continuing to think about and re-assess the patient during the course of their disease.
    5. Functioning as a “team player” with residents, attendings, nurses, ancillary staff and all others involved in the care of the patient.

    Objectives:

    Patient Care

    ·         Independently collect focused and comprehensive, developmentally appropriate patient histories and physical examinations

    ·         Develop a prioritized and inclusive problem list

    ·         Summarize interval patient information and rationale for ongoing clinical management

    ·         Suggest appropriate diagnostic tests for the patient’s chief complaint and other medical problems

    Medical Knowledge

    ·         Identify criteria for admission and discharge from the hospital

    ·         Describe the signs and symptoms that suggest deterioration or improvement of a patient’s clinical condition

    ·         Identify contraindications to therapeutic drug use in children of different ages and/or diagnoses

     

    Interpersonal and Communication Skills

    ·         Communicate effectively with patients and families across a broad range of socioeconomic and cultural backgrounds

    ·         Provide education and patient instructions to patients and families, using written or visual methods, taking into account their health literacy level

    ·         Write organized, appropriately focused, and accurate patient notes

    Professionalism

    ·         Demonstrate personal accountability, integrity, compassion, respect, altruism, and empathy when interacting with all members of the health care team, patients and their families, in order to provide the best patient care

    ·         Demonstrate punctuality and ability to complete patient care tasks efficiently

    Practice-Based Learning and Improvement

    ·         Demonstrate self-directed learning in daily practice

    o    Identify strengths, deficiencies, and limits in one’s knowledge and clinical skills through self evaluation

    o    Develop a plan for improvement, perform appropriate learning activities, solicit and incorporate feedback

    ·         Demonstrate evidence-based clinical practice

    o    Access appropriate resources to answer clinical questions

    o    Critically appraise relevant literature and incorporate it  into patient care

    Systems-Based Practice

    ·         Demonstrate the appropriate utilization of consultants, including social workers, nutritionist, physical therapists, etc.

     

     

     

    SPECIFIC DUTIES OF SENIOR STUDENTS

     

    The Senior student will work directly under the supervision of a member of the Pediatric faculty.

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     HOURS PER WEEK

     CONF      4 -6   HRS         WARD                      HRS           LAB                               HRS           LIBRARY            HRS

    OR                HRS           CLINIC   16-20       HRS                       LECTURE                 HRS             READING     1 0 __  HRS

    TOTAL NUMBER OF HOURS PER WEEK:   40           

    All

    Pass/Fail

  
  •  

    ELECT EPEDN - Pediatric Infectious Diseases


    ELECTIVE DIRECTOR(S): John Vanchiere, M.D., Ph.D. PHONE: 318.675.6081
    DURATION OF ELECTIVE: 4 Weeks or 2 weeks
    LOCATION OF ELECTIVE: LSU Health Sciences Center
    MAXIMUM NUMBER OF STUDENTS: 2 MINIMUM NUMBER OF STUDENTS: 1
    ELECTIVE OFFERED DURING BLOCKS: All
    COURSE CODE: EPEDN (4 week code) EPEDN2 (2 week code) CONTACT: Brenda Kolniak, 5-303A, 675.6081

    1 credit

    Goals:

    1. Focusing histories, physicals, and oral and written communication appropriately.
    2. Sharing information effectively with a patient and family.
    3. Prioritizing and organizing work effectively.
    4. Continuing to think about and re-assess the patient during the course of their disease.
    5. Functioning as a “team player” with residents, attendings, nurses, ancillary staff and all others involved in the care of the patient.

    Objectives:

    Patient Care

    • Independently collect focused and comprehensive, developmentally appropriate patient histories and physical examinations
    • Develop a prioritized and inclusive problem list
    • Summarize interval patient information and rationale for ongoing clinical management
    • Suggest appropriate diagnostic tests for the patient’s chief complaint and other medical problems

    Medical Knowledge

    • Identify criteria for admission and discharge from the hospital
    • Describe the signs and symptoms that suggest deterioration or improvement of a patient’s clinical condition
    • List drugs of choice and rationale for their use in common pediatric illnesses
    • Identify contraindications to therapeutic drug use in children of different ages and/or diagnoses
    • Calculate fluid and electrolyte requirements for children based on weight, caloric expenditure, diagnosis, and fluid status

    Interpersonal and Communication Skills

    • Communicate effectively with patients and families across a broad range of socioeconomic and cultural backgrounds
    • Provide education and patient instructions to patients and families, using written or visual methods, taking into account their health literacy level
    • Write organized, appropriately focused, and accurate patient notes

    Professionalism

    • Demonstrate personal accountability, integrity, compassion, respect, altruism, and empathy when interacting with all members of the health care team, patients and their families, in order to provide the best patient care
    • Demonstrate punctuality and ability to complete patient care tasks efficiently

    Practice-Based Learning and Improvement

    • Demonstrate self-directed learning in daily practice
      • Identify strengths, deficiencies, and limits in one’s knowledge and clinical skills through self evaluation
      • Develop a plan for improvement, perform appropriate learning activities, solicit and incorporate feedback
    • Demonstrate evidence-based clinical practice
      • Access appropriate resources to answer clinical questions
      • Critically appraise relevant literature and incorporate it into patient care

    Systems-Based Practice

    • Demonstrate the appropriate utilization of consultants, including social workers, nutritionist, physical therapists, etc.

     

     

     

     

    SPECIFIC DUTIES OF SENIOR STUDENTS

     

    Rounds are made daily with the faculty attending.  All Infectious disease consults and selected infectious disease problems (informal teaching cases) are seen.  Students follow each case, see consults initially and write consultation notes and progress notes under the direction and guidance of the faculty attending.

     

    A Pediatric Infectious Disease Clinic is held weekly on Wednesday mornings.  The last Wednesday of each month a Pediatric Viral Disease Clinic is held.  The student also attends X-ray Conference, Pediatric Grand Rounds and other appropriate Departmental conferences.  A Medicine/Pediatrics Infectious Disease Conference is held monthly.  An infectious Disease Journal Club is weekly.  Students are encouraged to participate in a small project during the elective period (i.e., chart review, literature review). 

     

    READING ASSIGNMENTS

     

    Based on assigned patients and topics, utilizing current textbooks, journals and online resources.

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    HOURS PER WEEK

    CONF      4     HRS          WARD   18-22            HRS        LAB                     HRS        LIBRARY    5     HRS

    OR                HRS         CLINIC      4-8          HRS        LECTURE               HRS     READING    _5__HRS

    TOTAL NUMBER OF HOURS PER WEEK:    36-44     

     

    All

    Pass/Fail

 

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