The page uses Browser Access Keys to help with keyboard navigation. Click to learn moreSkip to Navigation

Different browsers use different keystrokes to activate accesskey shortcuts. Please reference the following list to use access keys on your system.

Alt and the accesskey, for Internet Explorer on Windows
Shift and Alt and the accesskey, for Firefox on Windows
Shift and Esc and the accesskey, for Windows or Mac
Ctrl and the accesskey, for the following browsers on a Mac: Internet Explorer 5.2, Safari 1.2, Firefox, Mozilla, Netscape 6+.

We use the following access keys on our gateway

n Skip to Navigation
k Accesskeys description
h Help
   
Catalog 2016-2017
Louisiana State University Health Sciences Center
   
 
  Dec 12, 2017
 
 
    
Catalog 2016-2017

Course Descriptions

Contract All Courses |

 

Medical Technology

  
  •  

    MTEC 4143 - Diagnostic Hemostasis


    2 Credits

    A lecture and laboratory class that focuses on normal and abnormal hemostasis. This course is also designed to familiarize the student with the principles, procedures, application, and interpretation of coagulation techniques.

  
  •  

    MTEC 4144 - Clinical Special Chemistry Practicum


    1 Credit

    Discussions, demonstrations, and laboratory exercises performed in the clinical laboratory designed to familiarize the student with the principles, procedures, and interpretation of manual, advanced, and automated procedures in the special chemistry laboratory. Stresses quality control and assurance.

  
  •  

    MTEC 4145 - Clinical Parasitology and Mycology Practicum


    1 Credit

    Discussions, demonstrations, and laboratory exercises performed in the clinical laboratory designed to familiarize the student with the principles, procedures, and interpretation of general and advanced techniques as applied in the clinical laboratory.

  
  •  

    MTEC 4146 - Clinical Molecular Pathology Practicum I


    1 credit

    Discussions, demonstrations, and laboratory exercises performed in the clinical laboratory designed to familiarize the student with the principles, procedures, and interpretation of advanced techniques as applied in the molecular pathology laboratory. Students will spend one week in this rotation. Focus will be placed on Fluorescent In Situ Hybridization (FISH) analysis, chromosomal abnormalities, and polymerase chain reaction (PCR). The students will have the opportunity to stain and read slides for FISH analysis, then interpret the results. They will also perform PCR, including extraction and amplification of DNA and analysis of results.

  
  •  

    MTEC 4152 - Clinical Hematology


    3 Credits

    Lectures on normal function and morphology of the blood and bone marrow, and theoretical aspects of blood cell development and function. Emphasis is placed on recognition of the development and clinical significance of malignant and nonmalignant pathological changes occurring in disease states. Included will be evaluation and interpretation of available laboratory methods.

  
  •  

    MTEC 4153 - Clinical Hematology Laboratory


    2 Credits

    Discussion, demonstration and laboratory exercises performed in the student laboratory designed to familiarize the student with the principles

  
  •  

    MTEC 4202 - Laboratory Operations Management


    1 credit

    Lectures and practical exercises in laboratory operation management including laws and accrediting standard regulating laboratories, laboratory information systems, compliance, and evolving healthcare systems.

  
  •  

    MTEC 4203 - Research in Clinical Laboratory Science


    1 credit

    Lectures and projects in clinical laboratory research including statistical analysis, research design, evidence-based medicine and outcomes-based research, evaluation and application of published studies to clinical laboratory science.

  
  •  

    MTEC 4204 - Senior Seminar


    1 credit

    This course is required for all students in their fourth semester of study while in their clinical practicum courses. This course will be an intense, integrative review course of selected topics in clinical/medical laboratory science to prepare students for the board examination and state license.


Neurology

  
  •  

    ELECT ENEAU - Adult Neurology


    ELECTIVE DIRECTOR(S): Erik Burton, M.D. PHONE: 318.675.7760
    DURATION OF ELECTIVE: 4 Weeks
    LOCATION OF ELECTIVE: LSU Health Sciences Center and/or VAMC
    MAXIMUM NUMBER OF STUDENTS: 2 MINIMUM NUMBER OF STUDENTS: NA
    ELECTIVE OFFERED DURING BLOCKS: All, by arrangement
    COURSE CODE: ENEAU

    1 credit

    OBJECTIVES AND/OR GOALS

     

    This is a one month clinical elective on the adult neurology service or special clinical and/or research assignments can be arranged. The clinical rotation includes participation in consult rounds at LSU Health Sciences Center as well as participation in both general and specialty neurology clinics. Special instruction in neurological diagnostic testing can be incorporated into the rotation and this may include: EEG, EEG Telemetry, EMG, sleep studies, carotid ultrasound and evoked response. This rotation will be individually arranged through the Chairman of Neurology (Dr. Robert Schwendimann).

     

     

     

     

    SPECIFIC DUTIES OF SENIOR STUDENTS

     

     

    See patients under supervision of faculty in clinic and on consultation services. Attend and participate in teaching conferences and rounds. Reading assignments will be given designed to fit the elective. With special arrangements, the student can be involved in a specific research project.

     

     

     

     

    READING ASSIGNMENTS

     

    Reading assignments will be given designed to fit the elective content.

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    HOURS PER WEEK

    CONF          5            HRS      WARD        10           HRS        LAB                          HRS      LIBRARY                     HRS

    OR                  HRS                  CLINIC        15            HRS        LECTURE                  HRS     READING         10            HRS

    TOTAL NUMBER OF HOURS PER WEEK:      40         

    All, by arrangement

    Pass/Fail

  
  •  

    ELECT ENSLE - The Sleep Medicine Experience


    ELECTIVE DIRECTOR(S): Oleg Chernyshev, MD PHONE: 318-675-8568
    DURATION OF ELECTIVE: 4 Weeks
    LOCATION OF ELECTIVE: LSU Health Sciences Center
    MAXIMUM NUMBER OF STUDENTS: 2 MINIMUM NUMBER OF STUDENTS: 1
    ELECTIVE OFFERED DURING BLOCKS: All
    COURSE CODE: ENSLE

    1 credit

    Primary Goals of Elective:

    To acquire an extended knowledge of the principles of Sleep Medicine and the practice thereof within an academic outpatient Sleep Medicine specialty clinic.

     

    Specific Objectives:

    The student will be able to:

    1. (PC) Demonstrate the ability to obtain and document a comprehensive sleep medicine history.
    2. (MK) Demonstrate an understanding of the basic neuroanatomy of Sleep and Wake, with a knowledge of the neurotransmitters and structures involved.
    3. (MK) Demonstrate an ability to discuss the “two-process model” of sleep-wake regulation, and describe how this may be used to understand perturbations of sleep and wake.
    4. (MK, PC) Discuss the mechanisms by which sleep apnea can contribute to cardiovascular risk.
    5. (PC) Demonstrate the ability to perform and document a physical exam with an emphasis on the upper airway, to establish presence of features predisposing to sleep apnea.
    6. (PC, MK) Be able to discuss the pharmacologic principles and patient-relevant issues (such as adverse effects of) various types of medications used to treat daytime sleepiness.
    7. (PC, MK) Be able to discuss the pharmacologic principles and patient-relevant issues (such as adverse effects of) various types of medications used as hypnotics.
    8. (PC, MK) Discuss the various types of sleep diagnostic studies, including full-night polysomnogram, split night polysomnogram, titration polysomongram, out of center sleep testing, actigraphy, and sleep logs, and be able to discuss when these should be used.
    9. (PC, MK) Discuss diagnostic criteria for common sleep medicine problems, such as obstructive sleep apnea, restless legs syndrome, narcolepsy, idiopathic hypersomnia, and REM behavior disorder.
    10. (PC, MK) Demonstrate the ability to perform a positive airway pressure (PAP) follow up visit, and discuss a methodical approach to troubleshooting PAP intolerance.
    11. (I&CS) Communicate pertinent patient information relevant to Sleep Medicine problems to supervising providers in an efficient and logical way.
    12. (SBP) Discuss health care delivery issues as related to underserved and unfunded patients with Sleep Medicine problems.
    13. (PBL&I) Use online resources in investigation of clinical questions, to improve patient care, and support personal education.
    14. (P) Attend all clinics and conferences attended by the clinic team and keep the team informed of their whereabouts at all times.
    15. (I&CS, P, MK, PBL&I) Demonstrate the ability to present a Sleep Medicine-pertinent subject in an academic setting (Sleep Medicine Grand Rounds).
    16. (MK, PC). Describe and recognize common signals used in formal polysomnographic testing, and recognize the common scored events in such studies, such as obstructive and central apneas, hypopneas, respiratory effort related arousals, and periodic limb movements of sleep.
    17. (MK, PC) Describe the features of different sleep stages, and recognize these patterns on a standard polysomnogram.

     

     

     

    SPECIFIC DUTIES OF SENIOR STUDENTS

    • Students will be expected to function in a sub-intern capacity, and will be paired with a Sleep Medicine fellow for the month. Depending on the individual student’s abilities, students may see patients independently, and present cases to an attending. Documentation of these encounters will be reviewed by the attending faculty, and will be expected to be professional, accurate, concise, and relevant.
    • Senior students will be expected to present an hour-long presentation at Sleep Medicine Grand Rounds in the last week of their elective. Topic will be determined during the first week of the elective.
    • Students must come to the lab during testing hours to observe at least one setup, along with the initial portion of the sleep testing.
    • Students will be evaluated by faculty and fellows using a standardized competency based evaluation form, and will be given a standardized test at the end of the block. Grand Rounds presentations will be given guided feedback.

     

     

    Required Reading

    Sleep Research Society Basics of Sleep Guide, 2nd Edition. Amlaner CJ, Fuller PM (Eds).  2009.

                  Chapters: 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 13, 14A&B, 18A&B, 21, 22

    McCarty, DE. Beyond Ockham’s Razor: Redefining Problem-Solving in Clinical Sleep Medicine using a “Five Finger” Approach. J Clin Sleep Med 2010; 6(30:292-269

    International Classification of Sleep Disorders, 3rd Ed. (2014)

     

     

    HOURS PER WEEK

    This is a Monday-Friday 8am-5pm experience. No night call and no weekend call is required.  The exception to this is that all rotating students must come in to the Sleep Lab during testing hours (8pm) to observe at least one polysomnographic setup, along with the initial portion of a sleep study (typically we like students to see at least one REM cycle!). This is a vital portion of the rotation, as it will help “de-mystify” the experience of sleep diagnostic testing. This experience lasts 2-3 hours typically.

     

    CONF    1 HRS          WARD  0 HRS        LAB 12 HRS      LIBRARY 4 HRS

    OR  0  HRS         CLINIC 16 HRS        LECTURE  0 HRS          READING variable HRS

    TOTAL NUMBER OF HOURS PER WEEK:    ~40   

     

    ALL

    Pass/Fail

  
  •  

    NEURO 300 - Neurology/Neurosurgery


    Robert Schwendimann, M.D., Clerkship Director (Neurology)
    Christina Notarianni, M.D., Clerkship Director (Neurosurgery)

    2 credit hours

    This 2 week rotation will give students an exposure to both inpatient and outpatient neurology and neurosurgical patients.  Majority of teaching/learning will occur in the hosptial and ambulatory care setting - at the bedside.  Students will round with both services over the 2 week period, as well as attend clinics and observe in the operating room.  Both faculty attendings and residents in Neurology and Neurosurgery will share the teaching responsibilities.  Teaching sessions are expected to be case-based and interactive iwth minimal formal lectures.  Emphasis will be placed achieving competency in obtaining a neurological history and performing an adequate neurological examination.  Attention will be given to common neurological problems as well as neurological emergencies.  Students will be expected to competently present cases in both written and oral form.  Adequate feedback on performance will be part of the learning experience. 

  
  •  

    SELECT SCNEU - Community Based Medicine


    ELECTIVE DIRECTOR(S): Erik Burton, M.D.
    ELECTIVE COORDINATOR: Megan Davenport Phone: 318-675-5281
    DURATION OF ELECTIVE: 4 weeks
    LOCATION OF ELECTIVE: Highland Clinic and VA
    MAXIMUM NUMBER OF STUDENTS: 1 MINIMUM NUMBER OF STUDENTS: NA
    ELECTIVE OFFERED DURING BLOCKS: All
    COURSE CODE: SCNEU

    1 credit

     

     

     

    PRIMARY GOALS OF SELECTIVE

                    Student will work with physicians in practice in the community.

     

    SPECIFIC OBJECTIVES: (The Student will)

    1.  Independently evaluate some patients and discuss them with mentor.

    2.   Be exposed to principles of office management and medical economics.

    3.  Learn documentation requirements and exposure to effects of social, cultural, and societal problems.

     

    RESOURCES FOR LEARNING

        Texts:  Student will be provided with the necessary texts.

         Workshops:  Friday grand rounds and noon conferences

         Hands-on Experience:  Student will learn to rapidly assess extent of evaluation required for patient care.

         Computer-assisted instruction:  Assistance will be on as needed basis

         Directed readings:  Will be assigned by mentor

         Self-Directed learning:  understand the importance of developing life-long self directed learning skills     

     

    PARTICIPATING FACULTY

    Highland Clinic
    Meghan Harris, MD
    1455 E. Bert Kouns Ind. Loop
    PO Box 51455
    Shreveport, LA 71105
    Ph: 318-798-4458    Fax: 318-798-4474
     

     

    EVALUATION(GRADEWILLBEBASEDON)

    Student will receive a passing grade if they demonstrate increasing proficiency in the above objectives. This will be evaluated by their mentor’s feedback throughout the month to further improve any deficiencies which may occur. They will be expected to demonstrate a professional demeanor and wear appropriate attire for the clinic.  Their attendance at conferences and clinics will be carefully monitored and all absences must be pre-approved. Punctuality will be mandatory for a passing grade.

     

    LEARNINGENVIRONMENTS:

    These will include conferences, lectures, the ward service and the clinic.

     

     

     

    All

    Pass/Fail

  
  •  

    SELECT SINEA - Inpatient Acting Internship


    ELECTIVE DIRECTOR(S): Erik Burton, M.D. PHONE: 318.675.7760
    DURATION OF ELECTIVE: 4 weeks
    LOCATION OF ELECTIVE: LSUHSC
    MAXIMUM NUMBER OF STUDENTS: 1 MINIMUM NUMBER OF STUDENTS: NA
    ELECTIVE OFFERED DURING BLOCKS: All
    COURSE CODE: SINEA

    1 credit

     

     

    PRIMARY GOALS OF SELECTIVE

    Provide students with advanced expertise in the neurologic evaluation of patients in primarily the in-patient setting, but also to involve basic neurologic problems in the out-patient clinic. Student will be expected to improve skills in both taking the neurological history, as well as performing the neurological examination. In addition, students will be expected to improve their differential diagnostic abilities for neurologic disease, as well as enhance their skills in management of neurological patients both in a ward and clinic environment.

     

    SPECIFIC OBJECTIVES: (The Student will)

    1. Improve skills in obtaining a neurologic history and performing a neurologic examination.

    2. Become familiar with the performance and interpretation of EEGs, EMG/Nerve Conduction Studies, Sleep Studies, Evoked Response Testing, EEG Telemetry and neurophysiological surgical monitoring by accompanying their patients to these procedures.

    3. Improve performance of certain procedures such as the lumbar puncture, and in interpretation of Neuroimaging

    Studies.

    4. Improve diagnostic abilities in neurologic disease, especially in those problems presenting as cognitive disturbances, altered mental status, syncope/seizures, sensory and motor disturbances, basal ganglion dysfunction, and headache presentations.

    5. Learn to choose and utilize various medications seen in neurologic practice as those for management of stroke, epilepsy, dementia, movement disorders, central nervous system infections, neuromuscular junction and headache problems; as well as conditions such as spasticity and neuropathic discomfort.

     

    RESOURCES FOR LEARNING

    1. On the ward, the student will extensively evaluate with history and neurologic examination at least three patients per week, following them with daily evaluations and subsequent notations, which will become part of the hospital chart.

    2. In the out-patient setting, the student will attend at least once a week the Residents’ Continuity Clinic at which time one to two new patients and/or 2-3 follow-up patients will be evaluated with the particular resident and faculty attending.

    3. The student clerk will also attend conferences with their team residents including noon conferences and weekly

    Grand Rounds and other appropriate lectures and seminars as able.

    4. Textbooks, including the third year Perkin’s Neurology and Adams and Victor’s Principles of Neurology available in the library, as well as journals available digitally and researched via PubMed, will be used to enhance learning from the particular patient that the student is evaluating. Via these resources, the clerk will become familiar with the typical presentation, neurologic findings, pathophysiology, and treatment modalities of his patient’s problem, and be able to present this to his ward team.

     

    PARTICIPATING FACULTY

    Members of the Department of Neurology as ward service attending or attending in the Residents’ Continuity Clinic, neurophysiology and neuroimaging facilities.

     

    EVALUATION(GRADEWILLBEBASEDON)

    Student will receive a passing grade if they demonstrate increasing proficiency in the above objectives. This will be evaluated by their team resident and attending with feedback throughout the month to further improve any deficiencies which may occur. They will be expected to demonstrate a professional demeanor and wear appropriate attire for the clinic or ward. Their attendance at conferences, ward rounds, and clinics will be carefully monitored and all absences must be pre-approved. Punctuality will be mandatory for a passing grade. Student will also be asked to take part in 260 evaluations of residents and staff. A written accounting of patients evaluated with their specific diagnoses will be required.

     

    LEARNINGENVIRONMENTS:

    These will include conferences, lectures, the ward service and clinic outpatient service. The student will be expected to take call with the resident until 11 p.m. on that residents call night. Clerks will attend neurophysiology lab to observe testing on their specific patients. All activities will be performed at the LSU Health Science Center.

    All

    Pass/Fail


Neurosurgery

  
  •  

    ELECT ENSRS - Neurosurgery Research Elective


    ELECTIVE DIRECTOR(S): Anil Nanda, M. D. / Christina Notarianni, M. D.
    DURATION OF ELECTIVE: 4 Weeks
    ADMINISTRATIVE CONTACT: LaToya Hemphill
    LOCATION OF ELECTIVE: LSUHSC, Willis Knighton, Christus Schumpert Hospitals
    MAXIMUM NUMBER OF STUDENTS: 2
    ELECTIVE OFFERED DURING BLOCKS: ALL
    COURSE NUMBER: ENSRS
    MUST HAVE PRIOR CONSENT TO SCHEDULE - Information is outlined in Moodle

    1 credit

    Objectives and Goals:

     

    The student will conduct an approved research project under the direction of neurosurgery faculty.

    • The student will learn how to complete IRB approval and assist in IRB approval for their project
    • The student will learn how to collect and maintain data for evaluation
    • The student will understand basic statistical analysis of their data under the supervision of departmental faculty
    • The student will learn how to write a medical research paper.He/She will be expected to produce an abstract and manuscript for faculty approval on their project
    • If  the research is an ongoing project or uncompleted at the end of the elective, the student will be present a powerpoint presentation of their current data and the goals of the completion of the study during one of the weekly case conferences.

     

     

    Reading Assignments

                    Will be directed under the supervision of the faculty advisor

     

    Grading

                    A final evaluation will be based on participation in the project, punctuality, maturity, and production of a manuscript at the end of the elective. 

     

     

     

     

    HOURS PER WEEK

    CONF                     HRS      WARD                   HRS        LAB                          HRS      LIBRARY                     HRS

    OR                  HRS                  CLINIC                    HRS        LECTURE                  HRS     READING                     HRS

    TOTAL NUMBER OF HOURS PER WEEK:        40      

    All

    Pass/Fail

  
  •  

    ELECT ESURG - Neurosurgery Service Elective


    ELECTIVE DIRECTOR(S): Anil Nanda, M. D. / Christina Notarianni, M. D.
    DURATION OF ELECTIVE: 4 Weeks
    ADMINISTRATIVE CONTACT: LaToya Hemphill
    LOCATION OF ELECTIVE: LSUHSC, Willis Knighton, Christus Schumpert Hospitals
    MAXIMUM NUMBER OF STUDENTS: 2
    ELECTIVE OFFERED DURING BLOCKS: ALL
    COURSE NUMBER: ESURG

    1 credit

    *** We will not consider visiting student applicants for this elective. Visiting students should apply for the inpatient acting internship selective.*

     

    Goals and Objectives:

    The student will gain more in depth knowledge on the management of neurosurgical patients with a variety of neurosurgical conditions

    • Correctly perform comprehensive neurological examinationsand correlate their findings to pathologic conditions in outpatient and inpatient settings.
      • The student will participate daily on inpatient rounds at LSU and examine patients daily, reporting to the chief resident
      • The student will participate in at least one outpatient clinic with an attending every week, taking a history and physical exam under the direction of the attending surgeon.
    • Understand the basic steps of common neurosurgical operative procedures for cranial and spinal conditions by participating in surgery daily.
    • Correctly explain and if possibly perform the steps of brain death evaluation.
    • Present one patient at the weekly case conference whereby a powerpoint presentation of the brief history, exam and imaging studies are presented with a brief discussion of the pathologic condition.

     

    The student will demonstrate professionalism and gain understanding of basic aspects of a neurosurgery practice.

    • Participate in all daily morning rounds with the neurosurgical team at LSUHSC, including film review and examination of inpatient ICU and floor neurosurgical patients under the supervision of neurosurgical chief residents.
    • Document attendance to the weekly neurosurgery case conference on Wednesday afternoons where residents present a neurosurgical case including history, physical exam, imaging studies, and intervention with a literature review on the disease topic.
    • Participation in faculty and resident clinics, including workups of patients during clinic.

    Specific Duties of Senior Students:

    • Active daily participation on morning rounds with residents and faculty
    • Daily participation during wards and intraoperative activities
    • Active participation of weekly faculty and/or resident clinics
    • Attendance of weekly departmental conferences
    • Self directed reading

     

    Reading Resources for Rotation:

    • Textbooks:
      1. Greenberg Handbook of Neurosurgery
      2. Essential Neurosurgery by Andrew Kaye
    • Online Resource: Neurosurgery Gray Matter: An Educational Overview, located on the Congress of Neurological Surgeons Website at: http://w3.cns.org/education/sans.asp

     

    Evaluation

    A final evaluation will encompass the student’s performance on rounds, skills in performing a neurological examination, fundamentals of knowledge, performance in case conference presentation, and professionalism.Professionalism is defined as punctuality, interaction with faculty, staff, and patients, and maturity.There will be no written or oral examination.

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    HOURS PER WEEK

    CONF                     HRS      WARD                   HRS        LAB                          HRS      LIBRARY                     HRS

    OR                  HRS                  CLINIC                    HRS        LECTURE                  HRS     READING                     HRS

    TOTAL NUMBER OF HOURS PER WEEK:               

     

    All

    Pass/Fail

  
  •  

    NSURG 300 - Neurosurgery


    Christina Notarianni, M.D., Clerkship Director

    2 credit hours

    Students will gain exposure to a clinical neurosurgical practice in both an outpatient and inpatient setting. The students will attend daily inpatient rounds at LSUHSC and will have the opportunity to scrub in on a variety of neurosurgical operations. They will attend faculty and resident clinics to observe the management of neurosurgical patients in an outpatient setting. Didactic one-on-one teaching with the medical students by the neurosurgical faculty and attendance at the weekly case conference will help students gain additional knowledge on neurosurgical conditions and interpretation of radiologic exams as it pertains to neurosurgical pathology. This overall goal of this rotation is to teach medical students the basic approach and management of common neurosurgical diseases so they may apply this knowledge as needed regardless of their final medical specialty.

  
  •  

    SELECT SINSA - Inpatient Acting Internship- Neurosurgery


    DIRECTOR FOURTH YEAR DEPARTMENT COURSES: Anil Nanda, M.D. / Christina Notarianni, M.D.
    SELECTIVE CATEGORY: Inpatient Acting Internship
    SELECTIVE DIRECTORS:
    ADMINISTRATIVE CONTACT:, LaToya Hemphill 675.8865, Rm #3-406
    LOCATION: LSUHSC - Shreveport
    NUMBER OF STUDENTS PER 4 WEEK BLOCK: 2, Maximum
    SELECTIVE AVAILABLE DURING BLOCKS: All
    COURSE CODE: SINSA NON-LSUHSC STUDENTS: YES, only ones interested in Neurosurgery

    1 credit

     

     

    Overview of Selective:

                    To prepare the student for an internship and residency in neurosurgery.  This selective is designed to enhance clinical skills in neurological and neurosurgical disease and critical care medicine, including diagnosis, examination, and management of neurosurgery patients. 

     

    Goals and Objectives:

     

    The student will gain more in depth knowledge on the management of neurosurgical patients with a variety of neurosurgical conditions.

    ·         Correctly perform comprehensive neurological examinations  and correlate their findings to pathologic conditions in an inpatient settings.

    o    The student will participate daily on inpatient rounds at LSU and examine patients daily, reporting to the chief resident

    o    The student will know how to manage and examination of comatose patients by performing exams on daily rounds in ICU with chief resident and neurosurgery faculty.

    o    Correctly explain and if possibly perform the steps of brain death evaluation.

    ·         Correctly workup neurosurgical patients in an outpatient setting, identifying non-surgical and surgical interventions of treatment.

    o    The student will participate in at least one outpatient clinic with an attending every week, taking a history and physical exam, interpreting radiologic studies and constructing a treatment plan under the direction of the attending surgeon.

    ·         Understand the basic steps of common neurosurgical operative procedures for cranial and spinal conditions by participating in surgery daily.

    ·         At least one night of overnight call to experience how to manage emergency calls and surgical interventions as needed.

    ·         Present one patient at the weekly case conference whereby a powerpoint presentation of the brief history, exam and imaging studies are presented with a brief discussion of the pathologic condition.

     

     

    The student will demonstrate professionalism and gain understanding of basic aspects of a neurosurgery practice.

    ·         Participate in all daily morning rounds with the neurosurgical team at LSUHSC, including film review and examination of inpatient ICU and floor neurosurgical patients under the supervision of neurosurgical chief residents.

    ·         Document attendance to the weekly neurosurgery case conference on Wednesday afternoons where residents present a neurosurgical case including history, physical exam, imaging studies, and intervention with a literature review on the disease topic.

    ·         Participation in faculty and resident clinics, including workups of patients during clinic. 

     

     

     

    Reading Resources for Rotation:

    ·         Textbooks:

    1.        Greenberg Handbook of Neurosurgery

    2.        Essential Neurosurgery by Andrew Kaye

    ·         Online Resource: Neurosurgery Gray Matter: An Educational Overview, located on the Congress of Neurological Surgeons Website at: http://w3.cns.org/education/sans.asp

     

     

    Evaluation

                    A final evaluation will encompass the student’s performance on rounds, skills in performing a neurological examination, fundamentals of knowledge, performance in case conference presentation, and professionalism.  Professionalism is defined as punctuality, interaction with faculty, staff, and patients, and maturity.  There will be no written or oral examination.

     

     

    All

    Pass/Fail


Obstetrics and Gynecology

  
  •  

    ELECT EOBGD - Clinical Ob/Gyn–Monroe


    ELECTIVE DIRECTOR(S): Sherry Luther, M.D. PHONE: 318.330.7652
    DURATION OF ELECTIVE: 4 Weeks
    LOCATION OF ELECTIVE: University Health Hospital, Monroe, LA
    MAXIMUM NUMBER OF STUDENTS: 1 MINIMUM NUMBER OF STUDENTS: 1
    ELECTIVE OFFERED DURING BLOCKS: All
    COURSE CODE: EOBGD code for 4 week; EOBDG2 code for 2 week

    1 credit

    Primary Goals of Elective:

    This advanced clinical OB/GYN elective is designed to provide the student interested in entering OB/GYN residency with a more in-depth experience in a clinical setting.  Both inpatient and outpatient patient care is involved.  The experience will include high-risk obstetrics, vaginal deliveries, assisting in gynecological surgery, outpatient gynecological care/procedures and coordination of care with the health-care team.

    Student must arrange this elective by speaking to Dr. Sherry Luther PERSONALLY. This is not a Family Medicine elective, but is arranged in coordination with the E.A. Conway Department of Family Medicine so that adequate housing may be assured.  Housing is provided, as available.

    Specific Objectives:

    The student will be able to:

    1. (PC,I & CS) Gather essential and accurate information about their patient and present it in an ordered meaningful way with a logical management plan.
    2. (PC) Obtain accurate histories, perform thorough physical exams and develop comprehensive management plans for various medical conditions complicating pregnancy such as diabetes, hypertension and sickle cell disease
    3. (PC) Obtain accurate histories, perform thorough physical exams and develop comprehensive management plans that require hospitalization such as premature labor, Preterm Premature Rupture of Membranes, preeclampsia, intrauterine growth restriction and others
    4. (PC) Learn the evaluation process of the progress of labor and the application of internal fetal monitoring devices
    5. (PC) Perform directly supervised deliveries of uncomplicated pregnancies
    6. (PC) Make informed recommendations about diagnostic and therapeutic interventions (surgical and non-surgical) based on patient information and preferences
    7. (PC) Participate in surgical procedures as an assistant to the primary surgeon
    8. (PC) Understand and perform normal post operative care and follow up of surgical patients
    9. (PC,MK)  Diagnose, evaluate and treat common ambulatory gyn problems, such as pelvic pain and irregular bleeding
    10. (PC, MK) Perform thorough and accurate well woman exams, to include breast and pelvic exam
    11. (PC) Understand when to use and how to perform common gyn office procedures such as wet prep and endometrial biopsy
    12. (MK) Demonstrate knowledge of gynecologic anatomy
    13. (MK) Evaluate and interpret lab abnormalities and formulate a response to them
    14. (MK) Evaluate antepartum and intrapartum states of mother and fetus
    15. (MK) Understand significant physiological changes of pregnancy as they are affected by medical diseases
    16. (I and CS) Present patient information and assessment to other members of the team, in an organized manner with attention to pertinent details and logical management plan
    17. (I and CS) Counsel and educate patients and their families in clinical, preoperative, operative and post operative setting
    18. (SBP) Work with health care professionals including those from other disciplines to provide patient-focused care
    19. (SBP) Understand health care delivery issues as related to the underserved female population
    20. (PBL&I) Use information technology to access information
    21. (P) Work effectively and harmoniously with all members of the OB/GYN service
    22. (P) Demonstrate punctuality, appropriate dress and demeanor for patient interaction
    23. (P) Be present and on time for all assigned activities, and let team know where they are at all times

     

    Resources for Learning:

     

    Participating Faculty: Drs. Luther, Menefee and Pharr

    Text: Williams Obstetrics, Williams Gynecology

     

    Evaluation:

     

    Students will be evaluated by faculty and residents who are assigned during the specific block period using a standardized competency based evaluation form based on the above objectives.

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    HOURS PER WEEK

    CONF                     HRS      WARD        24           HRS        LAB                          HRS      LIBRARY                     HRS

    OR                  HRS                  CLINIC      24       HRS        LECTURE                  HRS     READING                     HRS

    TOTAL NUMBER OF HOURS PER WEEK:        48      

     

     

    All

    Pass/Fail

  
  •  

    ELECT EOBON - Gyn Oncology


    ELECTIVE DIRECTOR(S): Destin Black, M.D. PHONE: 318.675.5380
    Senior clerkship director: Danielle Cooper, M.D. Phone: 318.675.5379
    DURATION OF ELECTIVE: 2 weeks
    LOCATION OF ELECTIVE: LSU Health Sciences Center / University Health
    MAXIMUM NUMBER OF STUDENTS: 1 MINIMUM NUMBER OF STUDENTS: 1
    ELECTIVE OFFERED DURING BLOCKS: Permission only from clerkship director
    COURSE CODE: EOBON

    .5 credit

    Primary Goals of Elective:

    To obtain advanced clinical and surgical experience in inpatient and outpatient care of gynecologic oncology patients.

    Specific Objectives:

    The student will be able to:

     

    1. (PC) Gather essential and accurate information about their patient.

    2. (PC, MK) Identify and discuss common gynecologic malignancies, most cancer pathologic types, and general recommendations for treatment.

    3. (PC, MK) Apply staging criteria to make informed recommendations about diagnostic and therapeutic interventions based on patient information and preferences, up to date scientific evidence and clinical judgment.

    4. (I&CS, MK) Counsel and educate patients and their families concerning their specific gyn malignancy.

    5. (MK) understand anatomic relationships as specific to different gyn malignancies and surgical techniques.

    6. (P, SBP) Work constructively with all members of the healthcare team in order to arrange appropriate follow up , consults requested or surveillance for gyn onc patients. 

    7. (P, SBP) Attend Tumor board to observe the team interaction of physicians and specialists to create management strategies for these tumor patients. 

    8. (P) Demonstrate punctuality, appropriate demeanor, professionalism, compassion and personal appearance for patient interactions.

    Resources for Learning:

    Participating Faculty: Destin Black, M.D., Robin Lacour, M.D.

    Residents on rotation will provide didactic lectures on gyn onc topics.

    Text: Handbook for Principles and Practice of Gynecologic Oncology. Second Edition. Douglas A. Levine et al.

    Recommended Resource: Berek and Hacker’s Gynecologic Oncology, 6th edition

     

    Evaluation:

    The senior student will be evaluated by the faculty and /or residents who are assigned to the specific block period using a standard competency based evaluation form based on the above objectives.

    The course is pass/fail.

     

    All

    Pass/Fail

  
  •  

    ELECT EOREI - Reproduction Endocrinology and Infertility


    Elective Director(s): David Vandermolen, M.D. Phone: 318 841-5800
    Senior Clerkship Director: Danielle Cooper, M.D. Phone: 318-675-5379
    Duration of Elective: Two weeks.
    Location of Elective: Ark-La-Tex Fertility and Reproductive Medicine/Willis Knighton Medical Center
    Maximun number of students: 1.
    Minimum number of students: 1.
    Course Code: EOREI

    .5 credit

    Primary Goals of Elective:

     

    To obtain an advanced understanding of clinical, surgical, and assisted reproductive technology care of reproductive

    endocrinology and infertility patients.

     

    Specific Objectives:

     

    1. (P, MK) Perform efficient and comprehensive history and physical exams.

    2. (P,MK) Understand the hypothalamic-pituitary-ovarian-endometrial axis and applies that understanding to logical history,

    exam, differential diagnosis, and diagnostic evaluations.

    3. (PBL&I) Understand and review the outcome measures used in reproductive medicine including various types of pregnancies

    and rates, outcome measures for various treatments including controlled ovarian hyperstimulation and in vitro fertilization, and

    outcome databases such as that of the Society of Assisted Reproductive Technology (SART) for in vitro fertilization outcomes.

    4. (SBP) Understand the use and coordination of other care providers in preconceptual care and perioperative care.

    5. (I&CS) Learn and demonstrate the effective and sensitive communication skills required in taking reproductive histories and

    exams, discussing reproductive care options, and in discussing and informing patients of reproductive care outcomes, positive

    and negative.

    6. (PC) Apply appropriate evaluations and treatments for reproductive health conditions, medical, surgical, and with assisted

    reproductive technologies.

    7. (MK) Understand the diagnosis, differential diagnosis, laboratory and imaging evaluations, roles of medical and surgical

    therapies, and of assisted reproductive technologies, and when each are applicable to problems of abnormal puberty, abnormal

    menses, hyperprolactinemia, hyperandrogenism, PCOS, endometriosis and pelvic pain, recurrent pregnancy loss, infertility, and

    menopause conditions.

     

    Resources for Learning:

    Participating faculty: Dr. David Vandermolen

    Residents on rotation will provide case based learning discussions

    Students will observe office care, surgical care, and assisted reproductive technologies including reproductive laboratory

    procedures

    Text: Clinical Gynecologic Endocrinology and Infertility, 8th Ed. Fritz and Speroff

     

    Evaluation:

    The medical student will be evaluated by the faculty and/or residents who are assigned to rotation during the same time as the

    medical student. The evaluation will be done using a standardized competency form based on the above objectives.

    The course is pass/fail.

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    HOURS PER WEEK

    CONF            HRS          WARD                   HRS        LAB                          HRS      LIBRARY        HRS

    OR                  HRS         CLINIC                 HRS        LECTURE                 HRS          READING        HRS

    TOTAL NUMBER OF HOURS PER WEEK:               

    All

    Pass/Fail

  
  •  

    OBGYN 300 - Obstetrics and Gynecology


    Lily Yang, M.D., Clerkship Director

    6 credit hours

    In this 6-week clinical clerkship, the 3rd year medical student will be exposed to a broad variety of patients on the obstetrical and gynecologic services. They will participate in outpatient care of patients who are being seen for annual health maintenance, acute clinic with problems of both the obstetrical and gynecologic nature, routine OB clinics of both low and high-risk patients, gynecologic clinics encompassing the whole spectrum of gynecologic care from annual health maintenance to gynecologic oncologic conditions. They will also participate in inpatient care on gynecologic and obstetrical patients. This will include scrubbing in on surgeries under the supervision of the attending faculty and the house officers assigned to the services. The 3rd year student will rotate on the obstetrical service, which will consist of the Labor and Delivery rotation for one week. On the alternate week, they will be assigned to E. A. Conway Medical Center in Monroe under the direction of Dr. Curtis Sanders where they will participate in the care of both obstetrical and gynecologic patients. Students will also be assigned for 2 weeks in the Women’s Clinic for a variety of outpatient services that are provided. During their week in outpatient clinics, they will take call once or twice for Labor and Delivery at night. Students will also be assigned for 2 weeks to the gynecologic services. One week will be spent on the Benign GYN service where they will participate in both inpatient and outpatient care of patients with benign gynecologic conditions. One week will be spent on the GYN Oncologic service where they will, under the direction of our Gyn Oncology faculty, care for patients in both the inpatient and outpatient setting. This will include rotating at Willis-Knighton Medical Center to attend surgeries during that week with the gynecology faculty. Students on the Gyn service will take call in Labor during the weekends. Each week there will be a series of didactic lectures covering basic topics in obstetrics and gynecology. In addition, the students will participate in patient simulations using the birth simulator “NOELLE”. There will also be small group sessions to which the students will be assigned, including focused discussions with faculty members in reproductive endocrinology, high-risk obstetrics, and small group sessions in medical ethics in obstetrics and in safety.

  
  •  

    SELECT SIOGA - Inpatient Acting Internship-Obstetrics Service


    DIRECTOR FOURTH YEAR DEPARTMENT COURSES: Danielle Cooper, M.D.
    SELECTIVE CATEGORY: Inpatient Acting Internship
    SELECTIVE DIRECTORS: Danielle Cooper, M.D. dbaker1@lsuhsc.edu
    ADMINISTRATIVE CONTACT: 675.7440
    LOCATION: University Health - Shreveport
    NUMBER OF STUDENTS PER 4 WEEK BLOCK: 2
    SELECTIVE AVAILABLE DURING BLOCKS: All
    COURSE CODE: SIOGA

    1 credit

    Primary Goals of Selective:

    To provide a comprehensive hospital based experience in the management and care of high risk obstetrical patients.

    Specific Objectives:

    The Acting Intern will be able to:

    1. (PC) Obtain accurate histories, perform thorough physical exams and develop comprehensive management plans for various medical conditions complicating pregnancy such as diabetes, hypertension, and sickle cell disease.

    2. (PC) Obtain accurate histories, perform thorough physical exams and develop comprehensive management plans that require hospitalization such as premature labor, preterm premature rupture of membranes, preeclampsia, Intrauterine growth restriction and others.

    3. (PC) Learn the evaluation process of the progress if labor and the application of internal fetal monitoring devices.

    4. (PC) Perform directly supervised deliveries of uncomplicated pregnancies.

    5. (MK) Evaluate and interpret lab abnormalities and formulate a response to them.

    6. (MK) Evaluate antepartum and intrapartum states of mother and fetus.

    7. (MK) Understand significant physiological changes of pregnancy as they are affected by medical diseases.

    8.  (I&CS) Present patient information and assessment to other members of the team, in an organized manner with attention to pertinent details and logical management plan.

    9. (PBL&I) Use information technology to access information.

    10. (P) Work effectively and harmoniously with all members of the OB service.

    11. (P) Be present to report to all assigned academic activities on time and to let their team know where they are at all times.

    12. (P) Perform/complete all assigned tasks in a timely and careful manner.

    Resources for Learning:

     

    Participating Faculty: All LSUHSC-Shreveport GYN faculty

    Texts: William’s Obstetrics 24th ed. - Cunningham, MacDonald, Gant, Leveno

    Case Files in Obstetrics and Gynecology 4th ed by Toy, Baker, Ross, and Jennings

    Case Files in High-Risk Obstetrics by Toy, Yeomans, Fonseca, and Ernest

    ACOG Practice Bulletins and Compendium - selected topics

     

    Evaluation: The final grade will be Pass or Fail.

     

    The acting Intern will be evaluated by the faculty and or residents who are assigned to the specific block period using a standard competency based evaluation form based on the above objectives. For the practical portion of assessing technical skills, if the student is unable to perform directly supervised placement of intrauterine fetal monitoring or a vaginal delivery then simulation will be utilized to assess the student’s skills.

     

    The acting intern will submit a different weekly high risk patient interaction write up which includes pertinent history, physical exam and then assessment and plan and present this patient to the faculty coordinator or the designated faculty of the rotation. The expectation will be for a write up that reflects a well thought out differential and a presentation that succinctly communicates the logical thought process undergirding patient care. A total of 4 high risk obstetrical patients write ups will be submitted.

     

    The acting intern will also submit weekly a log of patients with the listing of their chief problems or diagnosis and of self-directed learning activities that were accomplished during the week. The submitted log will be the springboard for weekly meeting with the faculty coordinator or designated faculty for discussions which are designed to nurture critical thinking development.

    All

    Pass/Fail

  
  •  

    SELECT SIOGB - Inpatient Acting Internship-Gynecologic Pelvic Surgery


    SELECTIVE CATEGORY: Inpatient Acting Internship
    SELECTIVE DIRECTOR: Danielle Cooper, M.D.
    ADMINISTRATIVE CONTACT: 675.7440
    LOCATION: University Hospital - Shreveport
    NUMBER OF STUDENTS PER 4 WEEK BLOCK: 2
    SELECTIVE AVAILABLE DURING BLOCKS: All
    COURSE CODE: SIOGB

    1 credit

    Primary Goals of Selective:

    To provide a comprehensive surgical and clinical experience in gynecologic pelvic surgery.

    Specific Objectives:

    The Acting Intern will be able to:

    1.  (PC, I&CS) Gather essential and accurate information about their patient and present it in an ordered meaningful way with a logical management plan.

    2. (PC) Make informed recommendations about diagnostic and therapeutic interventions (surgical and non surgical) based on patient information and preferences.

    3. (PC) Participate in surgical procedures as an assistant to the primary surgeon.

    4. (PC) Understand and perform normal post operative care and follow up of surgical patients.

    5. (MK) Demonstrate knowledge of gynecologic anatomy.

    6. (I&CS) Counsel and educate patients and their families in clinical, preoperative, operative and post operative setting.

    7. (SBP) Work with health care professionals including those from other disciplines to provide patient-focused care.

    8. (PBL&I) Use information technology to support patient care decisions and patient education. 

    9. (P) Show willingness and ability to work effectively and harmoniously with all members of the gynecologic service.

    10. (P) Be present and on time for all assigned academic activities and let their team know where they are at all times.

    Resources for Learning:

    Participating Faculty: All LSU Health GYN faculty

    Texts: Williams Gynecology 2nd ed - Schorge, Schaffer, Halvorson, Hoffman, Bradshaw, Cunningham

    Case Files in Obstetrics and Gynecology 4th ed- Toy, Baker, Ross, Jennings

     

    Evaluation: The final grade will be Pass or Fail.

       The Acting Intern will be evaluated by the faculty and or residents who are assigned to the specific block period using a standard competency based evaluation form based on the above objectives.

       The Acting Intern will turn in 4 different comprehensive written history and physical exams with detailed assessment, differential diagnosis and plan of care covering different types of benign gynecologic conditions.

       The acting intern will submit weekly a log of patients who were seen by the student with listing of chief problems or diagnosis and of self-directed learning activities that were accomplished during the week. The submitted log will be the springboard for weekly meetings with the faculty coordinator or designated faculty for discussions to encourage critical thinking development.

     

     

    All

    Pass/Fail

  
  •  

    SELECT SIOGN - Gynecology Oncology


    SELECTIVE DIRECTOR: Destin Black, M.D.
    SENIOR CLERKSHIP DIRECTOR: Danielle Cooper, M.D. Phone: 318.675.7440
    DURATION OF ELECTIVE: 4 weeks
    LOCATION OF ELECTIVE: LSU Health Sciences Center / University Health
    MAXIMUM NUMBER OF STUDENTS: 1
    ELECTIVE OFFERED DURING BLOCKS: all
    COURSE CODE: SIOGN

    1 credit

    Primary Goals of Elective:

    To obtain advanced clinical and surgical experience in inpatient and outpatient care of gynecologic oncology patients.

    Specific Objectives:

    The student will be able to:

     

    1. (PC) Gather essential and accurate information about their patient.

    2. (PC, MK) Identify and discuss common gynecologic malignancies, most cancer pathologic types, and general recommendations for treatment.

    3. (PC, MK) Apply staging criteria to make informed recommendations about diagnostic and therapeutic interventions based on patient information and preferences, up to date scientific evidence and clinical judgment.

    4. (I&CS, MK) Counsel and educate patients and their families concerning their specific gyn malignancy.

    5. (MK) understand anatomic relationships as specific to different gyn malignancies and surgical techniques.

    6. (P, SBP) Work constructively with all members of the healthcare team in order to arrange appropriate follow up , consults requested or surveillance for gyn onc patients. 

    7. (P, SBP) Attend Tumor board to observe the team interaction of physicians and specialists to create management strategies for these tumor patients. 

    8. (P) Demonstrate punctuality, appropriate demeanor, professionalism, compassion and personal appearance for patient interactions.

    Resources for Learning:

    Participating Faculty: Dr. Destin Black, Dr. Robin Lacour

    Residents on rotation will provide didactic lectures on gyn onc topics.

    Students will attend all Tuesday Am conferences and Tumor board.

    Text: Handbook for Principles and Practice of Gynecologic Oncology. Second Edition.

    Douglas A. Levine et al.

    Reference: Berek and Hacker’s Gynecologic Oncology, 6th edition

     

    Evaluation:

    The senior student will be evaluated by the faculty and /or residents who are assigned to the specific block period using a standard competency based evaluation form based on the above objectives.

    The course is pass/fail.

    All

    Pass/Fail

  
  •  

    SELECT SOOGA - Outpatient- Obstetrics and Gynecology


    DIRECTOR FOURTH YEAR DEPARTMENT COURSES: Danielle Cooper, M.D.
    SELECTIVE CATEGORY: Outpatient
    SELECTIVE DIRECTORS: Danielle Cooper, M.D. dbaker1@lsuhsc.edu
    ADMINISTRATIVE CONTACT: 675.7440
    LOCATION: University Health - Shreveport
    NUMBER OF STUDENTS PER BLOCK: 2
    SELECTIVE AVAILABLE DURING BLOCKS: All
    COURSE CODE: SOOGA for 2 week block and SOOGB for 4 week block

    .5 credit

    Specific Objectives:

    The student will be able to :

    1. (PC) Enhance history taking and examination skills by providing primary contact of both new patients and return visit patients under the supervision of OB/GYN faculty and housestaff.
    2. (PC, MK) Become familiar with available forms of contraception, contraindications and common side effects.
    3. (PC, MK) recognize and evaluate the postmenopausal patient and identify her particular healthcare needs.
    4. (PC, MK) Diagnose, evaluate and treat common ambulatory gyn problems, such as pelvic pain and irregular bleeding.
    5. (PC, MK) Perform thorough and accurate well woman exams, to include breast and pelvic exam.
    6. (PC) Understand when to use and how to perform common gyn office procedures such as wet prep and endometrial biopsy.
    7. (PC, MK) Evaluate, treat and manage common low risk obstetrical patients and manage routine prenatal care.
    8. (I&CS) Develop proficiency at obtaining a reproductive and sexual history.
    9. (I&CS) Communicate pertinent patient information to supervising providers in an efficient and logical way.
    10. (P) Demonstrate punctuality, appropriate dress and demeanor for patient interaction.
    11. (SBP) Understand health care delivery issues as related to the underserved female population.
    12. (PBL&I) Utilize online resources to improve patient care and support their own education.
    13. (P) Attend all clinics and conferences attended by the clinic team and let their team know where they are at all times.

     

    Resources for Learning:

     

    Participating Faculty: All LSU Health OB/GYN faculty

    Text: Williams Obstetrics 24th ed.- Cunningham, MacDonald, Gant, Leveno

    Williams Gynecology 2nd ed- Schorge, Schaffer, Halvorson, Hoffman, Bradshaw, Cunningham

    Case Files in Obstetrics and Gynecology 4th ed. Toy, Baker, Ross, Jennings

     

    Evaluation: Final grade will be Pass or Fail

    Students will be evaluated by faculty and residents who are assigned during the specific block period using a standardized competency based evaluation form.

    Students will submit a single weekly patient interaction write up which includes pertinent history, physical exam and then assessment and plan and present the patient to the faculty coordinator of the rotation. The expectation will be for a write up that reflects a well thought out differential and a presentation that succinctly communicates the logical thought process undergirding patient care. Write up will be on one obstetrics patient and one gynecology patient.

    Student will submit weekly a log of patients who were seen by the student with listing of chief problems or diagnosis and of self-directed learning activities that were accomplished during the week. The submitted log will be the springboard for weekly meeting with the faculty coordinator or designated faculty for discussions to encourage critical thinking development

    All

    Pass/Fail


Occupational Therapy

  
  •  

    OCCT 6413 - Independent Study


    1-3 Credits

    The course credit, content, written objectives, and evaluation criteria will be jointly established by the student and instructor. These may be documented in writing and placed in the student’s file by the tenth day of the semester or summer term. This course can be retaken for maximum of six semester hours credit.

    Prerequisite: Consent of the department.

  
  •  

    OCCT 6511 - Concepts of Occupation


    3 Credits

    This course focuses on the history, philosophy, and sociopolitical influences on the profession to provide foundational concepts and tools for occupational therapy practice. Occupation-based theoretical frameworks will be presented as well as common models for practice. Guidelines for occupational therapy practice will be addressed to assist students in integrating core concepts with the occupational therapy process.

  
  •  

    OCCT 6513 - Occupational Performance Across the Lifespan


    3 Credits

    This course provides students with an in-depth inquiry into the essential principle of the occupational therapy profession: occupation. All areas of occupation are explored ADL, IADL, education, work, play, leisure, social participation, rest and sleep. Critical analysis of occupational choices, habits, routines, and lifestyles as they influence the health and well-being of individuals is emphasized.

  
  •  

    OCCT 6519 - Interactive Reasoning


    3 Credits

    An intense study of the client-centered collaborative relationship. Therapeutic use of self, interview skills, communication styles, professional/personal values, family systems, sociocultural influences, and group process will be explored through group discussion, experiential learning and client interviews.

  
  •  

    OCCT 6523 - Medical Conditions


    3 Credits

    This course focuses on the etiology, symptomatology, and medical management of selected medical conditions. Students will be introduced to professional roles in the treatment of these conditions.

  
  •  

    OCCT 6524 - Professional Development Seminar


    1 Credit

    This seminar course provides a foundational introduction to professional development. Topics include: professional expectations and progression, professional communities, higher order learning, curriculum values and beliefs, scholarship of writing and fieldwork expectations.

  
  •  

    OCCT 6525 - Applied Anatomy


    2 Credits

    Lectures, demonstrations and labs are designed to complement Allied Health Human Anatomy. Fundamental concepts involving surface anatomy; identification of anatomical landmarks, manual muscle testing, and palpation of joints and muscles, human movement analysis, and conditions that influence the functions of movements will be emphasized.

  
  •  

    OCCT 6526 - Introduction to Fieldwork A


    .5 credits

    This course introduces students to the purpose and process of fieldwork.

  
  •  

    OCCT 6527 - Introduction to Fieldwork B


    .5 credits

    This course focuses on the Fieldwork Policies and Procedures

  
  •  

    OCCT 6535 - Therapeutic Occupations and Activities


    3 Credits

    Therapeutic Occupations & Activities explores the meaning and use of occupations and activities as therapeutic media.  The analysis of activity, according to the Occupational Therapy Practice Framework, 3rd Ed (AOTA, 2014), is covered as a basis for the appropriate selection, grading, and adaptation of therapeutic occupations in relationship to treatment goals throughout the lifespan.  Lecture, experiential teaching methods and case-based formats will be used to enhance the student’s understanding and practical application of therapeutic occupations and activities. 

  
  •  

    OCCT 6567 - Neurological Conditions and Occupation


    3 Credits

    A lecture and laboratory course that introduces selected neurological disorders including the underlying neuropathology, diagnostic criteria, etiology, epidemiology, prognosis and clinical presentation. Emphasis will be placed on clinical presentation and correlating neuroanatomical structures and functions. Lab experiences will provide inter-professional collaboration between occupational therapy and physical therapy students and implications for occupational therapy and physical therapy practice will be explored. 

  
  •  

    OCCT 6613 - Occupational Therapy for Orthopedics


    4 Credits

    Orthopedic conditions across the lifespan will be addressed. Specific orthopedic evaluations, treatment techniques, splinting procedures and modalities will be emphasized. Occupational performance for activities of daily living in work, play/leisure, self care across the lifespan is the focus of lectures and labs.

  
  •  

    OCCT 6625 - Occupation Based Practice I: Pediatrics


    5 Credits

    This course covers major theoretical frameworks, concepts, and models of practice used in occupational therapy evaluation and treatment of infants/children.  The effects of disease or disorder on occupational performance will be introduced.  An emphasis will be placed on the use of occupation as a therapeutic medium, patient/family education and training, analysis of abnormal movement patterns, and examination of atypical sensory patterns.  Students will apply treatment interventions that will address impairments, activity limitations, and participation restrictions as they relate to occupational performance.  Clinical reasoning skills will be utilized to make educated decisions regarding appropriate treatment methods using a client centered approach.  Case studies, laboratory experiences and Fieldwork I will provide opportunities for students to enhance thier understanding of these concepts.

     

  
  •  

    OCCT 6632 - Occupation Based Practice II: Mental Health


    5 Credits

    An examination of the influence of physical and psychosocial well-being on occupational performance across practice settings. Review of evidence and theories regarding etiology, assessment, and treatment of mental health dysfunction in occupational therapy.

  
  •  

    OCCT 6641 - Clinical Reasoning I


    2 Credits

    This course focuses on the development of professional and clinical reasoning skills needed to make client-centered and evidence-based decisions in occupational therapy.  Emphasis is on students’ ability to critically analyze clinical experiences.

  
  •  

    OCCT 6661 - Scholarly Inquiry I


    2 Credits

    This course covers concepts of inferential statistics including standard error, tests of significance, type I and II errors, and selection of appropriate statistical tests. Students will develop skills needed to design basic clinical research and to critically interpret professional literature.

  
  •  

    OCCT 6671 - Assistive Technology


    2 credits

    This course will teach the student learner how to use assistive technology to support occupational performance through compensatory strategies and adapting the environment.

  
  •  

    OCCT 6733 - Clinical Reasoning II


    2 Credits

    This course focuses on clinical documentation to ensure accountability and reimbursement of services. Documentation of OT services includes: assessment, treatment planning, intervention, discharge, general reports, and home programs.

  
  •  

    OCCT 6741 - Occupation Based Practice III: Adult Neuro


    4 Credits

    This 4 credit course teaches the student learner how to use the occupational therapy process to evaluate, plan, and implement occupation-based practice in order to address the ADL, IADL, education, work, play, rest, sleep, leisure, and social participation occupational performance needs of young and middle adults with neurological impairment.  Laboratory experiences and Level I Fieldwork will provide opportunities for students to use knowledge and demonstrate skills learned in the classroom.

  
  •  

    OCCT 6761 - Scholarly Inquiry II


    3 Credits

    An examination of quantitative and qualitative research methods used to advance the body of knowledge in occupational therapy. Topics include, but are not limited to, hypothesis generation, sampling, research design, measurement, data analysis, IRB procedures, and funding.

  
  •  

    OCCT 6771 - Clinical Evaluation and Assessment


    2 Credits

    This course provides a foundation for selecting and administering Occupational Therapy evaluation tools to assess occupational performance and participation in diverse populations across the lifespan. Students will develop a basic understanding of how to select, administer, and interpret Occupational Therapy evaluations based on the needs of the client and relate the results to treatment planning.

  
  •  

    OCCT 6817 - Management in Occupational Therapy


    3 Credits

    Information will be presented on current health care policy issues, factors that influence the issues and resultant effect on the provision of occupational therapy services. Other topics will include: regulatory systems, reimbursement mechanisms and appeals, credentialing, professionalism, career development, occupational therapy roles, ethical resolution of conflict, client advocacy, quality assurance and program evaluation.

  
  •  

    OCCT 6819 - Community Based and Specialized Practice


    3 Credits

    The focus of this course is on specialized areas of practice and community-based practice.  Students be exposed to various models of community practice and learn to create job opportunities in emerging areas of occupational therapy practice.  

     

  
  •  

    OCCT 6833 - Clinical Reasoning III


    2 Credits

    This 2-credit course completes the trilogy of clinical reasoning courses by building on foundational clinical reasoning and Occupational Therapy Practice Framework concepts taught in previous semesters.  The course addresses the role occupational therapists have in a variety of traditional and community settings, team collaboration, advocacy, national and global healthcare strategies.  Professional responsibilities are highlighted as students prepare for clinical practice. 
     

  
  •  

    OCCT 6841 - Occupation Based Practice IV: Older Adult


    5 Credits

    This 5-credit course provides an occupation-based theoretical foundation for the mid-adult through older adult with psychosocial and physical problems that interfere with occupational performance. This course includes lectures and labs related to occupational and social functioning in activities and societal roles. Students will use clinical reasoning skills to make decisions regarding the selection of appropriate treatment methods and use of effective clinical techniques. Laboratory experiences will provide opportunities for students to practice selected evaluation and treatment methods.

  
  •  

    OCCT 6861 - Scholarly Inquiry III


    3 Credits

    Development of skills needed to a) locate, analyze, synthesize and apply evidence in response to a specific clinical question; and b) write a scholarly research proposal. 

  
  •  

    OCCT 6911 - Fieldwork Experience Level II


    9 Credits

    This fieldwork provides an in-depth experience in delivering occupational therapy services to clients. Students are supervised in a practice setting full time (40 hours per week) for 1-4 months.

    Note: In addition to costs for fees and required items listed in
  
  •  

    OCCT 6913 - Fieldwork Experience Level II


    6 Credits

    This fieldwork provides an in-depth experience in delivering occupational therapy services to clients. Students are supervised in a practice setting full time (40 hours per week) for 1-4 months.

    Note: In addition to costs for fees and required items listed in

Ophthalmology

  
  •  

    ELECT EOPTA - Clinical Elective in Ophthalmology-Career Interest


    ELECTIVE DIRECTOR(S): Thomas B. Redens, M.D. PHONE: 318.675-5012
    DURATION OF ELECTIVE: 4 Weeks
    LOCATION OF ELECTIVE: LSU Health Sciences Center Eye Clinic
    MAXIMUM NUMBER OF STUDENTS: 5 MINIMUM NUMBER OF STUDENTS: 1
    ELECTIVE OFFERED DURING BLOCKS: I-III
    COURSE CODE: EOPTA

    1 credit

    **This elective requires that students keep an attendance log.  Each student will be responsible for obtaining a physician’s signature each time he/she reports to work at the Eye Clinic.  Blank attendance logs may be obtained from  Moodle. **

     

     

     

    OBJECTIVES AND/OR GOALS

     

    The elective is designed for those students interested in Ophthalmology as a career. Blocks I-III are reserved for this elective to qualify students for ophthalmology match.  The course will offer the student an in-depth experience in the various facets of Ophthalmology:

    1. Patient work- up and management under supervision of residents and faculty.
    2. Training in the use of many specific ophthalmic equipment and techniques will be offered.

     

     

     

     

    SPECIFIC DUTIES OF SENIOR STUDENTS

     

    Direct patient work-up and care under supervision. A half hour presentation to the Department is a requisite. This will be measured by the evaluations completed after the required presentation and the evaluation form provided by the Registrar’s office.

     

     

     

     

    READING ASSIGNMENTS

     

    General Ophthalmology, Vaughn et al., Appleton and Lange

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    HOURS PER WEEK

    CONF       2     HRS          WARD                   HRS        LAB                          HRS      LIBRARY        HRS

    OR        5          HRS         CLINIC      30           HRS        LECTURE         3        HRS      READING        HRS

    TOTAL NUMBER OF HOURS PER WEEK:      40+         

     

     

    blocks 1-3

    Pass/Fail

  
  •  

    ELECT EOPTB - Clinical Elective in Ophthalmology-Non Career Interest


    ELECTIVE DIRECTOR(S): Thomas B. Redens, M.D. PHONE: 318-675-5012
    DURATION OF ELECTIVE: 2-4 Weeks
    LOCATION OF ELECTIVE: LSU Health Sciences Center Eye Clinic
    MAXIMUM NUMBER OF STUDENTS: 3 MINIMUM NUMBER OF STUDENTS: 1
    ELECTIVE OFFERED DURING BLOCKS: 4-11
    COURSE CODE: EOPTB (4 week code) EOPTB2 (2 week code)

    .5-1 credit

    **This elective requires that students keep an attendance log.  Each student will be responsible for obtaining a physician’s signature each time he/she reports to work at the Eye Clinic.  Blank attendance logs may be obtained from  Moodle. **

     

     

     

    OBJECTIVES AND/OR GOALS

     

    A 2-4 week clinical elective in ophthalmology for students interested in more exposure to eye diseases but not considering ophthalmology as a career.  Blocks IV-XI are available for this elective.

    1. The students will be exposed to a broad variety of ocular disorders, the natural course of the disease, differential diagnosis and therapy. This activity will be measured by the patient log, the evaluations from residents and faculty after the mini-grand round presentation and the evaluation form at the end of the rotation.
    2. The students will also gain more experience in the work-up of ocular disease and the instruments commonly used in this work-up. This activity will be measured by the patient log, the evaluations from residents and faculty after the mini-grande round presentation and the evaluation form at the end of the rotation.

     

     

     

    SPECIFIC DUTIES OF SENIOR STUDENTS

     

    The duties will depend upon the interest of the student with the ultimate objective that the student assumes evaluation and management of the patient’s condition under supervision of resident and faculty. At the end of the elective, the student will give a mini-grand round presentation to the residents and faculty.

     

     

     

    READING ASSIGNMENTS

     

    General Ophthalmology, Vaughn et al., Appleton and Lange

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    HOURS PER WEEK

    CONF       2     HRS          WARD                   HRS        LAB                          HRS      LIBRARY        HRS

    OR        5          HRS         CLINIC      30           HRS        LECTURE         3        HRS      READING        HRS

    TOTAL NUMBER OF HOURS PER WEEK:      40+         

     

    blocks 4-11

    Pass/Fail

  
  •  

    OPHTH 300 - Ophthalmology


    Joel Schulman, M.D., Clerkship Director

    2 credit hours

    In this two week course, the students are assigned to a first year ophthalmology resident in the general clinic who is expected to teach the students the eight components of a general ocular examination and to expose the student to a wide variety of ocular diseases. It is expected of the student to demonstrate this newly acquired knowledge in assisting the resident in the work-up of the general clinic patient. The student is expected to observe at least one surgical procedure representative of each of the frequently performed operations in the ophthalmology surgical suite. The student is also expected to master a series of seven slide teaching sets of four common conditions of the eye and three leading courses of preventable blindness felt by the expert committee of the American Academy of Ophthalmology to be essential knowledge of eye diseases necessary for the general practicing physician to know.

  
  •  

    SELECT SOPHT - Ophthalmology Selective


    ELECTIVE DIRECTOR: Thomas B. Redens, M.D.
    ADMINISTRATIVE CONTACT: Sherlyn Brown, Room 4-403 Medical School
    SELECTIVE CATEGORY: Outpatient Clinic
    DURATION: 2 Weeks
    LOCATION: University Health - Shreveport
    NUMBER OF STUDENTS PER 2 WEEK BLOCK: 2
    SELECTIVE AVAILABLE DURING BLOCKS: 3-9
    COURSE CODE: SOPHT

    .5 credit

     

     

    **This outpatient selective requires that students keep an attendance log.  Each student will be responsible for obtaining a physician’s signature each time he/she reports to work at the Eye Clinic.  Blank attendance logs may be obtained from  Moodle. **

     

     

     

    Primary Goals of Selective:

    The goal of the selective is to provide students interested in Ophthalmology as a career a more in-depth and complete introduction to the specialty. Ultimately, the selective rotation serves two purposes; the first is to provide a meaningful month of learning about the eye, and to allow the interested student more time to evaluate if Ophthalmology is, indeed, their lifelong career choice.  These goals will be measured by the evaluation of their required mini-grand round presentation and the evaluation form on completion of the rotation.

     

     

    Specific Objectives:

    1.        The students will work with the residents and faculty in the examination and treatment of patients with a variety of ocular and medical conditions.

    2.        Students, by the end of the rotation, will workup new patients and present their findings to their resident or faculty.

    3.        Students may also participate in ocular surgery (as assistants).

    4.        At the end of the selective, the student will give a mini-grand round presentation to the residents and faculty. The presentation will be evaluated by the attending residents and faculty members.

    5.        The specific requirements for reading, procedures, performed, etc., will vary by specialty clinic.

     

    Resources for Learning:

     

    Participating Faculty:  Dr. Redens, Kavanaugh, Liang, Schulman, Byrd, and Halpern

    Texts: Kanskys Text of Ophthalmology

    Workshops: N/A

    Hands-on Experience: Both in the clinic and OR with faculty and residents.

    Computer Assisted Instruction: N/A

    Directed Readings:  Per individual faculty

     

     

    Evaluation:

     

    Based on faculty evaluations / resident evaluations.

     

    Blocks 3-9

    Pass/Fail


Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery

  
  •  

    ELECT EOMSO - Clerkship in Oral and Maxillofacial Oncology


    ELECTIVE DIRECTOR(S): Jennifer E. Woerner, DMD, MD, FACS; David Kim, DMD, MD, FACS; Brett Shirley DDS, MD
    PHONE: 318-675-6036
    DURATION OF ELECTIVE: 4 Weeks
    LOCATION OF ELECTIVE: LSU Health Sciences Center/ Willis Knighton Medical Center/VA
    MAXIMUM NUMBER OF STUDENTS: 3 MINIMUM NUMBER OF STUDENTS: 1
    ELECTIVE OFFERED DURING BLOCKS: All
    COURSE CODE: EOMSO

    1 credit

      GOALS

    • The goal of this block is for Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery Tracked medical students to learn the management of premalignant and malignant diseases of the head and neck region from the assessment stage through the rehabilitation stage.

     

     

     

    OBJECTIVES

    • During this course each student will:
      • Maintain a patient log documenting the premalignant disease Head and Neck patients and malignant disease Head and Neck patients that student is involved in.Below are the required number and type of patients that the student needs to participate in during the rotation
        • 5 patients with pre-malignant disease of the head and neck
        • 5 patients with active malignant disease of the head and neck
        • 5 patients on follow up regimen with a history of malignant disease of the head and neck
    • Attend and participate in the operating room at least once a week in the surgical treatment of premalignant and malignant diseases of the head and neck region
      • Accurately stage at least 10 cancer patients using the NCCN guidelines for cancer care for the supervising resident and attending when presenting patients during OMFS Head and Neck cancer clinics on Friday afternoon at the ambulatory care center.

     

     

     

    SPECIFIC DUTIES OF SENIOR STUDENTS

     

    • Active Evaluation or patients in the in-patient and out-patient setting, under supervision of residents and faculty
    • Participating in Oral and Maxillofacial Oncology cases in the operating room and assisting when appropriate
    • Attendance at Tumor Board

     

     

     

    READING ASSIGNMENTS

     

    • Shah JP, Patel SG.Head and Neck Surgery and Oncology, 4th Edition, 2012

     

     

     

    HOURS PER WEEK

    CONF      3   HRS          WARD            HRS        LAB                    HRS      LIBRARY       HRS

    OR           16       HRS         CLINIC       16     HRS        LECTURE                  HRS          READING    HRS

    TOTAL NUMBER OF HOURS PER WEEK:         

    ALL

    Pass/Fail

  
  •  

    ELECT EOMST - Clerkship in Oral and Maxillofacial Trauma


    ELECTIVE DIRECTOR(S): Jennifer E. Woerner, DMD, MD, FACS; Celso Palmieri DDS; Zachary T. Legan DDS, MD
    PHONE: 318-675-6036
    DURATION OF ELECTIVE: 4 Weeks
    LOCATION OF ELECTIVE: LSU Health Sciences Center/ Willis Knighton Medical Center /Rapides
    MAXIMUM NUMBER OF STUDENTS: 3 MINIMUM NUMBER OF STUDENTS: 1
    ELECTIVE OFFERED DURING BLOCKS: All
    COURSE CODE: EOMST

    1 credit

    GOALS

    • The goal of this block is for Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery Tracked medical students to learn the management of maxillofacial trauma from the assessment stage through the rehabilitation stage.

     

     

     

    OBJECTIVES

    • During this course each student will:
      • Maintain a patient log documenting the maxillofacial trauma patients that the student is involved in. Below are the required number and type of patients that the student needs to participate in the care of during the rotation
        • 10 patients with mandible fractures
        • 5 patients with midfacial/ zygomatic complex fractures
        • 5 patients with orbital floor fractures
    • Attend and participate in the operating room at least twice a week in the surgical treatment of patients with maxillofacial trauma
    • Participate in in-house call with the OMFS service at least once a week during the rotation
    • Demonstrate their knowledge to upper level residents and attendings of the work up, such as the reading of plain radiographs, CT scans, and laboratory studies, and current approaches to management of maxillofacial trauma during OMFS trauma clinic on Mondays and Tuesdays at the Ambulatory Care Center

     

     

     

     

    SPECIFIC DUTIES OF SENIOR STUDENTS

     

    • Active evaluation of patients in the in-patient and out-patient setting, under supervision of residents and faculty
    • Participating in Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery Trauma cases in the operating room and assisting when appropriate

     

     

     

    READING ASSIGNMENTS

     

    • Oral and Maxillofacial Trauma (4th edition), Fonseca, R.

     

     

     

    HOURS PER WEEK

    CONF       3  HRS          WARD        5    HRS        LAB                    HRS      LIBRARY       HRS

    OR          16        HRS         CLINIC       16     HRS        LECTURE                  HRS          READING    HRS

    TOTAL NUMBER OF HOURS PER WEEK:               40

    Pass/Fail

  
  •  

    ELECT EOOMS - Clerkship in Outpatient Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery


    ELECTIVE DIRECTOR(S): Jennifer E. Woerner, DMD, MD, FACS PHONE: 318-675-6036
    DURATION OF ELECTIVE: 4 Weeks
    LOCATION OF ELECTIVE: LSU Health Sciences Center/ Willis Knighton
    MAXIMUM NUMBER OF STUDENTS: 3 MINIMUM NUMBER OF STUDENTS: 1
    ELECTIVE OFFERED DURING BLOCKS: All
    COURSE CODE: EOOMS

    1 credit

      GOALS

    • The goal of this block is for Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery Tracked medical students to learn outpatient assessment and management of routine office based oral and maxillofacial diseases.

     

     

    OBJECTIVES

    • During the course each student will:
      • Maintain and document a patient log
      • Perform and document at least 5 Head and Neck Exams under the supervision of a senior resident
      • Perform and document at least 10 local anesthesia blocks (mandibular inferior alveolar nerve blocks, lingual nerve blocks, greater palatine blocks)
      • Perform and document assistance in extraction of at least 20 a total of unerupted and impacted teeth
      • Assist in the management of soft and hard tissue recontouring of 15 pre-prosthetic patients.
    • Understand the different methods of oral rehabilitation (non-implant and implant treatment plans).Document and give 5 case presentations on treatment planning of partially and fully edentulous patients to the supervising attending in clinic.

     

     

     

     

    SPECIFIC DUTIES OF SENIOR STUDENTS

     

    • Active evaluation of patients in the out-patient setting, under supervision of residents and faculty
    • Participating in Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery Outpatient surgery cases in the Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery department clinics.

     

     

     

    READING ASSIGNMENTS

     

    • Peterson’s Principles of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery (3rd ed.), Miloro, Ghali, Larsen, Waite, 2012

     

     

    HOURS PER WEEK

    CONF      3  HRS          WARD      5      HRS        LAB                    HRS      LIBRARY       HRS

    OR          16        HRS         CLINIC      16     HRS        LECTURE                  HRS          READING    HRS

    TOTAL NUMBER OF HOURS PER WEEK:      40         

    ALL

    Pass/Fail

  
  •  

    ELECT EPCRS - Clerkship in Oral and Maxillofacial Craniofacial Surgery


    ELECTIVE DIRECTOR(S): Jennifer Woerner, DMD, MD, FACS; Ghali E. Ghali DDS, MD, FACS, FRCS
    PHONE: 318-675-6036
    DURATION OF ELECTIVE: 4 Weeks
    LOCATION OF ELECTIVE: LSU Health Sciences Center/ Willis Knighton Medical Center
    MAXIMUM NUMBER OF STUDENTS: 3 MINIMUM NUMBER OF STUDENTS: 1
    ELECTIVE OFFERED DURING BLOCKS: All
    COURSE CODE: EPCRS

    1 credit

      GOALS

    • The goal of this block is for Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery Tracked medical students to learn the management of common diseases and facial deformities of pediatric Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery patients.

     

     

     

    OBJECTIVES

    • During this course each student will:
      • Maintain a patient log documenting the craniofacial deformity patients and pediatric Oral and Maxillofacial diseases that they were involved in. Below are the required number and type of patients that the student needs to participate in during the rotation
        • 5 patients with cleft lip
        • 5 patients with cleft palate
        • 5 patients with positional plagiocephaly
        • 2 patients with craniosynostosis
    • Attend and participate in the operating room at least once a week in the surgical treatment of pediatric patients with craniofacial deformities
    • Demonstrate their knowledge to upper level residents and attendings of the current approaches to antenatal investigation for craniofacial disorders when seeing these patients with the fellows and attendings in clinic
    • Demonstrate their knowledge of the relationship between form, function, and growth in pediatric craniofacial deformities and the staged reconstructive surgeries needed to minimize growth disturbances when seeing these patients with the fellows and attendings in clinic
    • Give a 30 minute presentation at the end of the rotation on the OMFS Thursday morning conference on a craniofacial syndrome with its associated deformities and the treatment

     

    SPECIFIC DUTIES OF SENIOR STUDENTS

     

    • Active Evaluation or patients in the in-patient and out-patient setting, under supervision of residents and faculty
    • Participating in Pediatric Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery cases in the operating room and assisting when appropriate
    • Attendance at Plagiocephaly, Craniofacial and Cleft Clinics

     

     

    READING ASSIGNMENTS

     

    • Kaban L, Troulis MJ.Pediatric Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery.2nd Ed.Saunders 2004

     

    HOURS PER WEEK

    CONF       3  HRS          WARD       5     HRS        LAB                    HRS      LIBRARY       HRS

    OR          16        HRS         CLINIC      16      HRS        LECTURE                  HRS          READING    HRS

    TOTAL NUMBER OF HOURS PER WEEK:   40      

    ALL

    Pass/Fail

  
  •  

    ELECT EREOM - Clerkship in Reconstructive Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery


    ELECTIVE DIRECTOR(S): Jennifer E. Woerner, DMD, MD, FACS; David Kim, DMD, MD, FACS; Brett Shirley DDS, MD
    PHONE: 318-675-6036
    DURATION OF ELECTIVE: 4 Weeks
    LOCATION OF ELECTIVE: LSU Health Sciences Center/ Willis Knighton Medical Center/VA
    MAXIMUM NUMBER OF STUDENTS: 3 MINIMUM NUMBER OF STUDENTS: 1
    ELECTIVE OFFERED DURING BLOCKS: All
    COURSE CODE: EREOM

    1 credit

    GOALS

    • The goal of this block is for Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery Tracked medical students to learn the management of different types of maxillofacial defects.

     

     

     

    OBJECTIVES

    • During this course eachstudent will:
      • Maintain a patient log documenting the different types of maxillofacial trauma patients that the student is involved in.Below are the required number and type of patients that the student needs to participate in during the rotation
        • 2 patients with mandibular defects
        • 2 patients with maxillary defects
        • 1 patient with scalp defect
        • 2 patients undergoing microvascular free flap reconstruction
        • 2 patients undergoing regional flap reconstruction
    • Attend and participate in the operating room at least once a week in the surgical reconstructive treatment of patients with maxillofacial defects
    • Recognize and be able to treatment plan to the head and neck fellows and attendings during clinic the most appropriate reconstructive procedure to achieve an optimum functional outcome in each of the following patients.
      • following respective surgery for tumors, osteoradionecrosis
      • of congenital and developmental conditions
      • of secondary deformity
    • Make a 20 minute presentation to the faculty and residents at the end of the rotation on a maxillofacial reconstructive topic

     

    SPECIFIC DUTIES OF SENIOR STUDENTS

     

    • Active evaluation of patients in the in-patient and out-patient setting, under supervision of residents and faculty
    • Participating in Reconstructive Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery cases in the operating room and assisting when appropriate

     

     

    READING ASSIGNMENTS

     

    • Flaps and Reconstructive Surgery, Fu-Chan Wei and Samir Mardini (2009)
    • Multidisciplinary Head and Neck Reconstruction: Adefect Oriented Approach, Mark Urken (2009)

     

     

     

    HOURS PER WEEK

    CONF       3  HRS          WARD        5    HRS        LAB                    HRS      LIBRARY       HRS

    OR             16     HRS         CLINIC     16       HRS        LECTURE                  HRS          READING    HRS

    TOTAL NUMBER OF HOURS PER WEEK:     40         

    ALL

    Pass/Fail

  
  •  

    SELECT SCOMS - Community-Oral & Maxillofacial Surgery


    ELECTIVE DIRECTOR(S): Jennifer E. Woerner, DMD, MD Phone: 318-675-6174
    DURATION: 4 weeks
    LOCATION: LSU Health Sciences Center
    MAXIMUM NUMBER OF STUDENTS: 4
    MINIMUM NUMBER OF STUDENTS: 1
    SELECTIVE AVAILABLE DURING BLOCKS: All
    COURSE CODE: SCOMS

    1 credit

    GOALS

    1. Students will learn the proper manner in which to evaluate, examine, and treat a patient presenting with an oral or maxillofacial or dentoalveolar (intraoral/dental related) complaint.
    2. Students will learn basic techniques to administer local and regional anesthesia in the head and neck region.
    3. Students will gain a better understanding of cleft and craniofacial conditions in the pediatric population.
    4. Students will improve their knowledge of the key features and basic management of head and neck cancer.
    5. Students will improve their understanding of the pathophysiology of temporomandibular joint disorder.
    6. Students will gain a better understanding of the operative scope and management of oral and maxillofacial surgery to include dentoalveolar surgery (intraoral/dental related procedures), head and neck oncology, orthognathic surgery (corrective jaw surgery), and cleft and craniofacial surgery.

     

     

    OBJECTIVES  

    The students will complete a checklist and case log that includes signatures from faculty, showing participation in all the clinics and required exams and cases listed in the objectives below.  This checklist and case log will be turned in to the Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Residency Coordinator, Lauren Lafitte, in Room 522 in the Administration Building (phone # 675-6036) following the completion of the rotation.

    • Each student will observe at least 5 thorough history and physical examinations by a faculty or house officer and then perform one thorough head and neck exam in the presence of either a faculty or a house officer. (Goal 1)
    • Each student will assist in at least 5 dentoalveolar procedures alongside a faculty or house officer and then demonstrate, on a skull model, proper local and regional anesthetic techniques to a faculty or house officer. (Goal 1 and 2)
    • The student will observe the evaluation and management of children with cleft and craniofacial conditions at one of each clinic: Cleft Clinic at WK-South, Cleft Clinic at Shriner’s Hospital for Children, Craniofacial Clinic at WK-South, and Positional Plagiocephaly at WK-South.Following the completion of each clinic, they will discuss and review, in an informal round table setting, the etiology and basic management of children cleft lip and palate with the faculty or craniofacial and cleft fellow. (Goal 3)
    • The student will observe the evaluation and workup of patients at one LSU head and neck oncology clinic.At the completion of clinic, they will discuss, in an informal round table setting, the key features and surgical management of head and neck cancer with the faculty or oncology fellow. (Goal 4)
    • The student will observe the evaluation and workup of patients at the one of the Temporomandibular Joint Disorder clinics at WK-South offered on the 1st and 3rd Tuesdays of the month. (Goal 5)
    • The student will observe at least 5 oral and maxillofacial surgery cases in the main OR at LSU, consisting of 2 trauma cases, 1 oncology case, 1 orthognathic surgery case, and one case of their choosing.The student will record them on their rotation case log and submit it at the end of the rotation. (Goal 6)

     

    SPECIFIC DUTIES OF SENIOR STUDENTS

     

     

    • Participating and assisting in the required Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery cases in the operating room at LSU OR 14.
    • Attending all required Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery clinics at LSU, Shriner’s Hospital for Children, and Willis Knighton South locations.
    • The students will complete a checklist and case log that includes signatures from faculty, showing participation in all the clinics and required exams and cases listed in the objectives below.This checklist and case log will be turned in to the Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Residency Coordinator, Lauren Lafitte, in Room 522 in the Administration Building (phone # 675-6036) following the completion of the rotation.

     

     

     

     

    READING ASSIGNMENTS

     

    • Students are encouraged to read about those patients cared for by the oral and maxillofacial surgery service during his/her rotation.
    • Peterson’s Principles of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery (3rd edition), M Miloro, GE Ghali, P Larsen, P Waite. (located on e-books provided by LSUHSC-Shreveport Library’s webpage)

     

     

     

     

     

    HOURS PER WEEK

    CONF         HRS          WARD            HRS        LAB                    HRS      LIBRARY       HRS

    OR       16     HRS         CLINIC    12       HRS        LECTURE                  HRS          READING   1-2 HRS

    TOTAL NUMBER OF HOURS PER WEEK:    29-30           

    All

    Pass/Fail


Orthopaedic Surgery

  
  •  

    ORTH 300 - Orthopaedic Surgery


    Margaret Olmedo, M.D., Clerkship Director

    0.60 credit hours

    This two week elective is spent in the clinic, operating room, and emergency room. Additional instruction is provided in departmental conferences.

  
  •  

    SELECT SIOSA - Inpatient Acting Internship- Orthopaedic Surgery


    DIRECTOR FOURTH YEAR DEPARTMENT COURSES: Margaret Olmedo, M.D.
    SELECTIVE CATEGORY: Inpatient Acting Internship
    SELECTIVE DIRECTOR: Margaret Olmedo, M.D.
    ADMINISTRATIVE CONTACT: Anna Beth Crowson, 675-4313, Room 3-316
    LOCATION: LSUHSC-Shreveport
    NUMBER OF STUDENTS PER 4 WEEK BLOCK: 3
    SELECTIVE AVAILABLE DURING BLOCKS: All blocks
    DURATION: 4 Weeks
    COURSE CODE: SIOSA

    1 credit

     

    Night Call - Yes                   Weekend Call - Yes             Final Exam - No

     

    Overall Educational Goal of Selective:

     

    This orthopaedic selective provides the student with an in-depth look at orthopaedic surgery.  The student will spend time at LSU Health.

     

    During their time at LSU the student will concentrate on the adult patient assessment with an emphasis on orthopaedic trauma. The student should become comfortable with the initial evaluation of orthopaedic patients. The student will also build on the skills they learned during the first three years of medical school and assume a higher level of responsibility for all aspects of patient care under the direct supervision of orthopaedic house staff and attending physicians in the inpatient and outpatient setting.

     

    Specific Objectives:

     

         1.    Improve the student’s skill in history taking and physical exam of the musculoskeletal system.

         2.    Improve decision making skills required for the appropriate utilization of diagnostic tests such (CT, MRI, etc.)

         3.    To familiarize the student with the diagnosis and management of a variety of patients (adult and pediatric)

    with orthopaedic problems that are routinely seen in a hospital setting.

         4.    To develop skills in patient education, counseling and discharge planning.

    5.    To improve the student’s knowledge of orthopaedic disease entities through participation in conferences and didactic teaching sessions.

     

     

    Brief Description of Student Activities During Rotation:

     

    At LSU Health, the student will be assigned to an orthopaedic team and will work under the direct supervision of a Junior and Senior resident.  They will participate in teaching rounds with the house staff and faculty.  The students will be given patients to manage.  They will be responsible for performing supervised histories and physical examinations and daily progress notes.  Students will take part in all educational programs in connection with this orthopaedic department.  The student will also take call with the junior resident in-house and is expected to help evaluate patients and to care for in-patients and patients in the emergency department.

     

    Recommended Textbook:

     

    Essentials of Musculoskeletal Care (4th edition)

     

     

     

    Method of Student Evaluation:

     

    The senior Resident and the Full-time Faculty will evaluate students throughout the rotation. As interest and time permits, the students will be asked to present on patients they have seen in clinic and in the hospital.


     

     

    All

    Pass/Fail

  
  •  

    SELECT SOOSA - Outpatient- Orthopaedics


    DIRECTOR FOURTH YEAR DEPARTMENT COURSES: Margaret L. Olmedo, M.D.
    SELECTIVE CATEGORY: Outpatient
    SELECTIVE DIRECTOR: Margaret L. Olmedo, M.D.
    ADMINISTRATIVE CONTACT: Anna Beth Crowson, 675.4313, Room 3-316
    LOCATION: LSUHSC - Shreveport
    NUMBER OF STUDENTS PER 2 WEEK BLOCK: 2
    SELECTIVE AVAILABLE DURING BLOCKS: All Blocks
    DURATION: 2 weeks
    COURSE CODE: SOOSA

    .5 credit

    Night Call - No                   Weekend Call - Yes             Final Exam - Oral

     

    Overall Educational Goal of Selective:

     

    The purpose of this selective is to build on the third year medical student rotation in orthopaedic surgery. This selective is designed for those interested in orthopaedic surgery, as well as for those interested in primary care who want to deepen their knowledge of clinical orthopaedic surgery.

     

    Specific Objectives:

     

       1.  Students will provide primary contact with patients on initial and follow-up clinic visits under faculty supervision.

    2.  Orthopaedic history and musculoskeletal physical examination skills will be improved.

    3.  Students will learn to adapt the extent of history and physical examination to what is needed for different diagnosis. This will translate into a working knowledge of the most common orthopaedic problems and their evaluation.

    4.  Students will be introduced to documentation and coding requirements.

     

    Brief Description of Student Activities During Rotation

     

    Each student will work under the direct supervision and guidance of a Junior and Senior resident in the outpatient setting. The students will be given patients to manage, with increasing responsibility for their care, including performance of histories and supervised physicals and daily progress notes. Special emphasis will be given to decision making and outpatient management of orthopaedic patients. Further, students will take part in outpatient clinic progress notes and all education programs in connection with the orthopaedic residency training program.

     

     

    Evaluation:

     

    The student will be evaluated on history and physical examination performed and presented orally to faculty and senior residents.

     

     

     

    All

    Pass/Fail


Otolaryngology/ Head and Neck Surgery

  
  •  

    ELECT EOTOB - Head/Neck Surgery


    ELECTIVE DIRECTOR(S): Maura Cosetti, M.D. PHONE: 318.675.6262
    DURATION OF ELECTIVE: 2 Weeks ADMINISTRATIVE CONTACT: Amy Ray, Rm. 9-203
    LOCATION OF ELECTIVE: LSU Health Sciences Center
    MAXIMUM NUMBER OF STUDENTS: 2 MINIMUM NUMBER OF STUDENTS: 1
    ELECTIVE OFFERED DURING BLOCKS: All except 5
    COURSE CODE: EOTOB

    .5 credit

     

     

    PRIMARY GOAL OF THE ELECTIVE

     

    To gain exposure and understanding of basic skills and principles underlying assessment and management of common diseases in Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery. 

     

    GENERAL DESCRIPTION OF THE ELECTIVE

     

    The student will participate as an active member of the Otolaryngology/Head and Neck Surgery Service. They  will  see patients  in  clinic  and,  with  supervision, be  allowed  to  make  therapeutic  decisions.  They will also assist in the operating room and gain experience in the pre and post-op care of the patient. Students will be exposed to all sub-specialties of Otolaryngology, including head and neck oncology, rhinology, facial plastic surgery, pediatric otolaryngology and otology-neurotology.  Depending on their area of interest, their 2 week rotation may be tailored by the course director to meet their specific interests. They will learn in detail the technique for a complete head and neck examination and gain a basis of interpreting some common audiologic and radiologic tests.

     

    SPECIFIC OBJECTIVES

     

    1.        To successfully perform and present a pertinent history on 2 patients in the Otolaryngology-HNS clinic with >90% accuracy.

    2.        To perform a complete head and neck physical exam of an adult and pediatric patient under direct supervision.

    3.        To propose a reasonable assessment and plan for 1 adult and 1 pediatric patient in the outpatient clinic.

    4.        To provide at least 1 clinical indication for obtaining an audiogram.

    5.        To provide at least 1 clinical indication for obtaining at CT scan.

    6.        To provide at least 1 clinical indication for fiberoptic laryngoscopy.

    7.        To identify 2 important elements of post-operative care in Otolaryngology.

     

     

    READING ASSIGNMENTS

     

    Primary text for the elective:  Primary Care Otolaryngology (Second Edition) 

    Additionally, students are to utilize reference textbooks and institutional resources for preparation for specific clinical cases, rounds and conferences.

     

     

     

     

     

     

    All except block 5

    Pass/Fail

  
  •  

    ELECT EOTOR - Research in Otolaryngology


    ELECTIVE DIRECTOR(S): Cherie-Ann Nathan, M.D. PHONE: 318.675.6262
    DURATION OF ELECTIVE: 4 Weeks ADMINISTRATIVE CONTACT: Amy Ray, Rm. 9-203
    LOCATION OF ELECTIVE: LSU Health Sciences Center
    MAXIMUM NUMBER OF STUDENTS: 4 MINIMUM NUMBER OF STUDENTS: 1
    ELECTIVE OFFERED DURING BLOCKS: All
    COURSE CODE: EOTOR
    MUST HAVE PRIOR CONSENT TO SCHEDULE

    .5-1 credit

    PRIMARY GOAL OF THE ELECTIVE

     

    Independent research in the Department of Otolaryngology under the direction of an identified Departmental faculty member.

     

     

     

     

    SPECIFIC OBJECTIVES

     

    1. Identification of a specific research question to be addressed during the elective.
    2. Completion of a research report (approximately 250 words) summarizing the research completed during the rotation.If research is to be submitted for presentation (poster or oral) or publication, this report can consist of any of the following:the abstract, actual poster in PPT format, or draft of manuscript.
    3. Additional project specific objectives to be assigned by the faculty research mentor.

     

     

     

     

    READING ASSIGNMENTS

     

    To be assigned by the faculty mentor depending on the research project .

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    HOURS PER WEEK

    CONF       0-4     HRS          WARD                 HRS        LAB               0-20         HRS      LIBRARY     5-10  HRS

    OR       0-10           HRS         CLINIC           0-10      HRS        LECTURE         0-4        HRS     READING   10-20   HRS

    TOTAL NUMBER OF HOURS PER WEEK:      40       

     

    All

    Pass/Fail

  
  •  

    OTOR 300 - Otolaryngology


    Vikas Mehta, M.D., Clerkship Director

    2 credit hours

    This two-week elective is spent with the Otolaryngology teams rotating through the Ambulatory Care/Feist Weiller Cancer Clinics and the Operating Room. Lectures and recommended readings/videos provide additional instruction in the diagnosis, workup, and treatment of various conditions encountered by Otolaryngologists in the Clinic and Or.

  
  •  

    SELECT SIOTA - Inpatient Acting Internship


    DIRECTOR FOURTH YEAR DEPARTMENT COURSES: Rebecca Chiffer, M.D.
    SELECTIVE CATEGORY: Inpatient Acting Internship
    SELECTIVE DIRECTORS: Rebecca Chiffer, M.D.
    ADMINISTRATIVE CONTACT: Amy Ray, 675.6262, Rm 9-203
    LOCATION: University Health Hospital - Shreveport and VAMC - Shreveport
    NUMBER OF STUDENTS PER 4 WEEK BLOCK: 3
    SELECTIVE AVAILABLE DURING BLOCKS: All except 6
    COURSE CODE: SIOTA NON-LSUHSC STUDENTS: Yes, only from LCME-accredited institutions

    1 credit

    Primary Goal of Selective

     

    To acquire the specialty knowledge and skills necessary to function at the intern level on the Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery Service.

     

    GENERAL DESCRIPTION OF THE ELECTIVE

     

    The student will participate as an active member of the Otolaryngology/Head and Neck Surgery Service. They  will  see patients  in  clinic  and,  with  supervision, be  allowed  to  make  therapeutic  decisions.  They may also assist in the operating room and gain experience in the pre and post-op care of the patient. Students will be exposed to all sub-specialties of Otolaryngology, including head and neck oncology, rhinology, facial plastic surgery, pediatric otolaryngology,  otology-neurotology, and laryngology.  Depending on their area of interest, their 4 week rotation may be tailored by the course director to meet their specific interests. They will learn in detail the technique for a complete head and neck examination and gain a basis of interpreting some common audiologic and radiologic tests.

    Specific Objectives:

    1. To successfully perform a history and physical examination on 1 adult and 1 pediatric patient in the outpatient setting with >90% accuracy.
    2. To generate a 3 or more-item differential diagnosis for the aforementioned adult and pediatric patient
    3. To propose a reasonable assessment and plan for the aforementioned adult and pediatric patient
    4. To demonstrate an understanding of sinus disease by listing at least 2 components of the treatment of acute sinusitis
    5. To demonstrate a basic understanding of behavioral audiometry by identifying a conductive and sensorineural hearing loss when presented with an audiogram,
    6. To accurately outline the approach to an upper airway emergency in an adult and pediatric patient
    7. To accurately identify at least 2 anatomical landmarks in thyroidectomy surgery.
    8. To successfully perform a flexible fiberoptic laryngoscopic exam under direct supervision.
    9. To successfully perform microscopic otoscopy under direct supervision.
    10. To successfully perform rigid endoscopy of the nasal cavity under direct supervision.
    11. To demonstrate mastery of surgical sterility principles by correctly scrubbing in to assist in the operating room.
    12. REQUIRED: To prepare and present a PowerPoint lecture on a specific topic of interest in Otolaryngology.The topic will be selected by the student and approved by the course director.
    13. tudents will be allowed to assist in the OR and also perform minor OR and clinic procedures under supervision of house staff and faculty.
    14. Students may take call as determined by the chief resident.

    Resources for Learning:

    Participating Faculty: LSUHSC Otolaryngology faculty

    Texts:   Baileys Book of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery; Cummings Otolaryngology - Head & Neck Surgery

    Weekly Didactics:  Grand Rounds (Tuesday 7:00 am); Tumor Board (FWCC, Tuesday 1 pm); Otolaryngology COCLIA (Tuesday 2-4 pm)

    Workshops: Temporal Bone Course when available/Anatomy course when available

    Hands on Experience: OR and clinic procedures

    Directed Readings: Preparation for weekly otolaryngology Tuesday didactic sessions (specific topics will depend of dates of elective rotation)

    Self-Directed Learning: Depending on cases seen in clinic or in the hospital

     

    Evaluation:

     

    Grade will be based on successful completion of the course specific objectives as well as attendance, punctuality and overall professionalism.

    All

    Pass/Fail

  
  •  

    SELECT SOENT - Outpatient Head & Neck Clinical Experience


    DIRECTOR FOURTH YEAR DEPARTMENT COURSES: Maura Cosetti, MD
    SELECTIVE CATEGORY: Outpatient Clinic
    SELECTIVE DIRECTORS: Maura Cosetti M.D., 318.675.6262, Room 9-203
    ADMINISTRATIVE CONTACT: Amy Ray, 675.6262, Rm 9-203
    LOCATION: LSU Hospital - Shreveport and VAMC - Shreveport
    NUMBER OF STUDENTS PER 2 WEEK BLOCK: 2
    SELECTIVE AVAILABLE DURING BLOCKS: All
    COURSE CODE: SOENT

    .5 credit

    Primary Goal of Selective

     

    The purpose of this selective is to gain an introduction to the fundamental concepts and skills utilized in Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery in the outpatient setting.  Students will also have an opportunity to observe and/or assist in the operating room, should they so desire.

     

     

     

     

    Specific Objectives:

    1.        To successfully perform and present a pertinent history on either 2 adult patients (if rotating at the VAMC) or 1 adult and 1 pediatric patient (if rotating at LSU Hospital) in the Otolaryngology-HNS clinic with >90% accuracy.

    2.        To perform a complete head and neck physical exam of an adult and pediatric patient under direct supervision.

    3.        To propose a reasonable assessment and plan for 1 adult and 1 pediatric patient in the outpatient clinic.

    4.        To provide at least 1 clinical indication for obtaining an audiogram.

    5.        To provide at least 1 clinical indication for obtaining at CT scan.

    6.        To provide at least 1 clinical indication for fiberoptic laryngoscopy.

     

     

    Resources for Learning:

     

    Participating Faculty: Drs. Stucker, Nathan, Lian, Gardner, Milligan, Aarstad, Little, Gungor, Mehta and Cosetti

     Texts: Primary Care Otolaryngology (Second Edition)

    Workshops: N/A

    Hands on Experience: Clinic/OR

    Computer Assisted Instruction:

    Directed Readings: Students are expected to read relevant literature so as to be prepared for operative cases as well as conferences. Directed conference reading will depend on timing of rotation.

    Self-Directed Learning: Primary Care Otolaryngology

     

     

    Evaluation:

     

    Grade will be based on successful completion of the course specific objectives as well as attendance, punctuality and overall professionalism.





    All

    Pass/Fail


Pharmacology, Toxicology and Neuroscience

  
  •  

    ELECT EPHAC - Research in Pharmacology


    ELECTIVE DIRECTOR(S): Ronald Klein, Ph.D. PHONE: 318.675.7850
    DURATION OF ELECTIVE: 4 Weeks
    LOCATION OF ELECTIVE: 5-203
    MAXIMUM NUMBER OF STUDENTS: 4 MINIMUM NUMBER OF STUDENTS: 1
    ELECTIVE OFFERED DURING BLOCKS: All
    COURSE CODE: EPHAC
    Must have approval prior to enrolling in course–please see information in Moodle

    1 credit

    Course Objectives

    *Demonstrate/conduct the stages of basic research including hypothesis and design, data acquisition, and statistical analysis, in the fields of pharmacology/toxicology/neuroscience.

    *Collect, organize, graph, and critically interpret pharmacology/toxicology/neuroscience data.

    *Describe suitable methodologies for answering the research question, and critically evaluate the advantages and disadvantages of alternate technical approaches.

    *Integrate clinical experiences with basic science by mastery of the current knowledge on the disease being studied, and novel therapeutic strategies under study.

    *Present research findings to peers, physicians, and scientists.

    Primary goals of the course

     

    Independent research in the Department of Pharmacology, Toxicology and Neuroscience under the direction of participating departmental faculty (e.g., Dr. Klein, Dr. Goeders, and others). The goal is to gain some hands-on research experience and also master the background and terminology of the overall problem/field being studied in terms of human health and disease and clinical relevance.

     

     

    Specific objectives required for the student to meet the goal(s) of the course

    To be assigned by the faculty research mentor. A mix of both laboratory experimentation and scholarly study of the literature and other sources, to achieve set objectives as determined by the mentor and the student.

     

    Necessary resources for learning

     

    Texts on Pharmacology, Toxicology, and Neuroscience, pertinent review and research articles from the journals, book chapters, other online and current media resources.

     

    Outcome and evaluation measures

    The laboratory notebook and a 3-5 page laboratory report will be used to help assess the student’s knowledge, skills, and professionalism (punctual attendance, maturity, interaction with faculty and other staff, etc.). Participation at scheduled lab meetings and potentially at research poster sessions on campus will help hone the student’s communication and overall professional skills.  

    HOURS PER WEEK

    CONF      _  HRS          WARD              HRS        LAB         40         HRS        LIBRARY   2   HRS

    OR                HRS         CLINIC            HRS              LECTURE              HRS      READING    2__HRS

    TOTAL NUMBER OF HOURS PER WEEK:   44_     

    All

    Pass/Fail

  
  •  

    ELECT EPHAD - Research in Biochemical, Molecular, or Clinical Toxicology


    ELECTIVE DIRECTOR(S): Kenneth E. McMartin, Ph.D. PHONE: 318.675.7871
    DURATION OF ELECTIVE: 4 Weeks
    LOCATION OF ELECTIVE: 5-216 or F8-36
    MAXIMUM NUMBER OF STUDENTS: 2 MINIMUM NUMBER OF STUDENTS: 1
    ELECTIVE OFFERED DURING BLOCKS: Blocks 1-4 & 8-11
    COURSE CODE: EPHAD Must have approval prior to enrolling in course - please see information in Moodle

    1 credit

    Goals:

    1. Understanding the similarities and differences between clinical and basic research.
    2. Sharing research-related information effectively with other clinicians and scientists.
    3. Prioritizing and organizing work effectively.
    4. Functioning as a “team player” with others involved in research studies.

     

    Objectives:

    Research Project

    • Participate in research projects that involve basic mechanisticstudiesorclinicalstudiesonnewantidotesfortoxic alcohol poisonings
    • Develop hypotheses for evaluation during the rotation, as appropriate.
    • Independently collect data for a research project

     

    Knowledge

    • Become proficient in basic research techniques including cell culture, membrane transport, measurement of toxicity parameters, as well as analysis using gas chromatography and high pressure liquid chromatography
    • Identify key principles for the ethical conduct of research.

     

    Interpersonal and Communication Skills

    • Work together with a research team.
    • Write organized, appropriately focused, and accurate research lab notebook
    • Organize data into presentable formats (digital, poster, oral presentation).

     

    Professionalism

    • Demonstrate personal accountability and respect when interacting with members of the research team.
    • Demonstrate punctuality and ability to complete research-related tasks efficiently.

     

    SPECIFIC DUTIES OF SENIOR STUDENTS

     

    The first duty will be to consult with the elective director to discuss the research interest of the student. After that, the direction of the elective towards an individual or cooperative project will be chosen. Then, the student will work in the director’s laboratory daily. Daily duties would depend on the actual analysis going on at that time. Ancillary duties would be reading and library research to prepare the project design and to develop any techniques needed to carry out the project.

    READING ASSIGNMENTS

                    As needed for the research project.

    HOURS PER WEEK

    CONF      _  HRS          WARD              HRS        LAB         30         HRS        LIBRARY   5   HRS

    OR                HRS         CLINIC            HRS              LECTURE              HRS      READING    5__HRS

    TOTAL NUMBER OF HOURS PER WEEK:   40_     

    All except block 1

    Pass/Fail

  
  •  

    PHARM 203 - Methods in Pharmacology


    3 Credits

    Hours and credit by arrangement. Consists of rotations through laboratories of department faculty. In general, the course should be taken for each rotation.

  
  •  

    PHARM 204 - Brain Research through Advanced and Innovative Neurotechnologies


    1 Credit

    The objective of the course is to enhance the students’ depth of knowledge of the cutting edge genetic, molecular, and pharmacologic approaches used for the anatomic and functional interrogation of neural circuity, brain development and disease.

    PHARM 233 Neuropharmacology

  
  •  

    PHARM 209 - Introduction to Research in Pharmacology


    1 Credit

    An introduction to research in Department of Pharmacology labs for incoming graduate students. This course will aid students in choosing their research rotations.

  
  •  

    PHARM 220 - Clinical Toxicology


    1 Credit

    Three day, all day course of lectures and panel discussion. This course deals with clinical and laboratory methods for the diagnosis and treatment of intoxication from drug over dosage and poisons. Special problems associated with drug abuse and industrial and environmental toxicology are also discussed. Independent topical paper is required.

  
  •  

    PHARM 221 - Advanced Topics in Pharmacology: Biochemistry


    2 Credits

    This course is the biochemistry portion of Medical School Module 1, Course 1 (Physiological Chemistry, Medical Genetics and Developmental Biology). An overview of the basic biochemical properties of amino acids and proteins, lipids and carbohydrates. The class also includes the basic principles of enzyme kinetics, membrane transport and important biochemical processes and enzymes that cells utilize to generate metabolic energy.

  
  •  

    PHARM 222 - Advanced Topics in Pharmacology: Molecular Biology


    2 Credits

    Molecular biology portion of Medical School Module 1, Course 1 (Physiological Chemistry, Medical Genetics and Developmental Biology). The course is a basic introduction to nucleic acids structure and function including replication, transcription, RNA processing and protein synthesis.

  
  •  

    PHARM 225 - Advanced Topics in Pharmacology


    1-5 Credits

    Hours and credits as well as lecture and laboratory to be arranged depending upon the special topic. This course is designed for advanced studies of special groups of drugs such as steroids, antibiotics, antihistamines, analgesics, etc.

  
  •  

    PHARM 233 - Neuropharmacology


    2 Credits

    A study of the structure and properties of membranes, axoplasmic transport, and the fundamental principles of neurotransmission and neuroendocrinology. Detailed study of the chemical transmitters in the central nervous system with special emphasis on drug-modifications of transmitter action and neuronal function, drug-modification of physiological function and behavioral pharmacology.

    IDSP 212 Foundations in Biomedical Sciences: Cardiovascular System

  
  •  

    PHARM 238 - Cardiovascular Pharmacology


    2 Credits

    Two hours of lecture. The study of drugs used to treat cardiovascular disorders with primary emphasis on their fundamental mechanism of action.

    IDSP 212  Foundations in Biomedical Sciences:  Cardiovascular System

  
  •  

    PHARM 240 - Behavioral Pharmacology


    1 Credit

    Basic principles of the experimental analysis of behavior, including operant and classical conditioning, and schedules of reinforcement. Definition and scope of behavioral pharmacology. Behavioral mechanisms of drug action. Drug environment interaction.

  
  •  

    PHARM 242 - Pharmacology of Drugs of Abuse


    1 Credits

    This course will discuss the behavioral and physiological effects of drugs of abuse and the mechanisms of action of these substances. This is a writing intensive course.

  
  •  

    PHARM 243 - Environmental Toxicology


    2 Credits

    Two hours of lecture and classroom discussion. A study of the effects of industrial, agricultural and other human produced pollutants on the deterioration of the environment. The control of environmental problems will be illustrated in case histories.

  
  •  

    PHARM 245 - Toxicology


    2 Credits

    A study of the general principles of toxicology, including the biochemical and physiological mechanisms by which injury is produced. Specific organ systems and toxic compounds will be discussed for illustration.

  
  •  

    PHARM 251 - Research in Pharmacology


    1-8 Credits

    This course offers in depth experience in research development, design, methodology and implementation. Students will undertake specific projects of limited scope and develop their findings under the guidance and direction of faculty preceptors.

  
  •  

    PHARM 258 - Pharmacokinetics and Pharmacodynamics


    1 Credit

    Two hours of lecture, twice a week. In depth presentation of receptor quantification and drug pharmacokinetics. Material is covered in lecture and through the completion of problem sets.  Student’s progress is judged baed on examination performance and take home problems.

  
  •  

    PHARM 260 - Molecular Pharmacology


    2 Credits

    Two hours of lecture, twice a week and student presentations.   This course provides  a  detailed  examination  of  molecular  events  that  occur during  and  after  drugs  bind  to receptors.   Intracellular signal transduction events and cross-talk among different systems are emphasized.

  
  •  

    PHARM 270 - Discussions in Neurochemistry and Neuropharmacology


    1 Credit

    A journal club/research presentation format in which students present and discuss new concepts and research findings in neurochemistry and neuropharmacology. Students will be taught critical assessment of research data and how new techniques can be applied to research problems. Grading will be by faculty on the basis of student presentations and participation in class discussions.

  
  •  

    PHARM 271 - Discussions in Toxicology


    1 Credit

    A journal club/research presentation format in which students present and discuss new concept and research findings in all areas of toxicology, including biochemical, clinical and environmental. Students will be taught to critically assess research data and how to apply new techniques to research problems. Grading will be based on student presentations and participation in class discussions.

  
  •  

    PHARM 272 - Discussions in Pharmacology


    1 Credit

    A journal club/research presentation format in which students present the content of new research publications and discuss the new concepts and research findings. A wide variety of topics relating to pharmacology will be covered. Students will learn the critical assessment of research data and how new techniques can be applied to research problems. Grading will be by faculty on the basis of student presentations and participation in class discussions.

  
  •  

    PHARM 298 - Seminar


    1 Credit

    Students are required to attend and participate in oral presentations of research data.  The student should register for seminar each year semester they are taking classes.  Grades will be assigned based on seminar presentation, but students must participate in seminar each semester regardless of whether they are registered for the course.

  
  •  

    PHARM 299 - Research Proposal in Pharmacology


    3 Credits

    A required course for all doctoral candidates. The student will write a proposal for his/her dissertation research in National Institutes of Health grant application format. The proposal should contain sections on a) Specific Aims, b) Background and significance, 3) Preliminary Studies, d) experimental methods, as well as detailed budget and justification, and rationale for the use of animals and/or humans if applicable. The proposal will be reviewed by the student’s Research Advisory Committee, which will include an expert in the research field from outside the University, and presented by the student before this Committee. The grade will be assigned by the Advisory Committee based on the scientific quality of the written proposal and its verbal defense.

  
  •  

    PHARM 400 - Dissertation Research


    1-9 Credits

    Registration by permission of instructor. Amount of credit must be stated at time of registration.


Physical Therapy

  
  •  

    PHTH 7550 - Functional Anatomy


    1 Credit

    A lecture and laboratory course in which students receive instruction in arthrokinematics and biomechanical principles and theories. Emphasis is placed on surface palpation and kinesiology.

  
  •  

    PHTH 7551 - Research I - Principles of Scientific Inquiry


    2 Credit

    The first of five sequential courses designed to develop in the student those skills necessary to utilize and apply in practice current information from peer-reviewed literature; and to prepare the student to participate in clinical and/or experimental research activities. Emphasis in this course is on library science, levels of research, application of statistics, and critical reading of literature related to physical therapy practice.

  
  •  

    PHTH 7552 - Clinical Decision-making


    3 Credits

    A critical exploration into basic legal, ethical, and psychosocial issues, which arise with delivery of health care such as confidentiality, informed consent, and health policy issues pertinent to physical therapy. In addition the student examines the standards that guide the profession and cultural, social, and psychological issues that influence clinical decisions.

  
  •  

    PHTH 7553 - Differential Diagnosis


    4 Credits

    This course provides the foundation for all other systems-focused courses. The underpinning is provided with pathology and epidemiology. Students learn the principles of a screening examination and performance of a variety of tests and measures for the specific purpose of establishing a physical therapy diagnosis toward which treatment can be directed. Emphasis is placed on the ability to differentially diagnose, recognize conditions requiring referral, and engage in critical thinking skills.

 

Page: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5


Contract All Courses |