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Catalog 2016-2017
Louisiana State University Health Sciences Center
   
 
  Dec 18, 2017
 
 
    
Catalog 2016-2017

Course Descriptions

Contract All Courses |

 

AHEC

  
  •  

    ELECT EAHEC - Rural Primary Care


    ELECTIVE DIRECTOR(S): Dr. Wanda Thomas PHONE: 318.675.5770
    ADMINISTRATIVE CONTACT: Shirley Wilson Phone: 318-675-8963
    AHEC Program Office, (Shreveport Program Office) Medical School, Rm 5-302
    DURATION OF ELECTIVE: 4 Weeks
    LOCATION OF ELECTIVE: Non-Metropolitan Communities in Louisiana
    MAXIMUM NUMBER OF STUDENTS: maximum of seven students per AHEC site per block
    ELECTIVE OFFERED DURING BLOCKS: 1-11

    1 credit

    Application REQUIRED at registration.  Only students with confirmed placement will be allowed to complete rotation       under   AHEC.

    Available on the web at http://www.lsuhscshreveport.edu/Education/othertraining/ahec/index

     

    NOTE: THIS ELECTIVE MAY NOT BE DROPPED WITHIN 1 MONTH OF THE STARTING DATE.

     

    Goal: The student will have the opportunity to observe and participate in all aspects of the practice of primary care medicine in a variety of rural settings.  The student will gain both knowledge and insight into the practice of primary care medicine in a rural setting.

    GOAL:  The student will have the opportunity to observe and participate in all aspects of the practice of primary care medicine in a rural setting.  The student will gain both knowledge and insight into the practice of primary care medicine in a rural setting.

    OBJECTIVE 1:  The student will obtain and write a problem focused history on a patient.  He will then describe the problem focused physical exam findings and the management plan developed.  The preceptor will critique the write up and give formal written feedback.

    OBJECTIVE 2:  The student will compare and contrast how common disease processes are diagnosed and managed in an academic institution as opposed to a rural primary care setting. One of the disease processes will be written up and turned into the program office upon completion of the rotation.

    OBJECTIVE 3:  The student will learn to differentiate between documentation requirements for billing and reimbursement for rural primary care settings and those required in an academic/hospital setting.

    OBJECTIVE 4:  The student will create a successful community practice planned based on his experience in a rural primary care clinic. The practice plan will include time management, the doctor-patient relationship, office management and medical economics, medico-legal issues and risk reduction, appropriate referral practices, and continuing education.  This practice plan will be reviewed and critiqued by the preceptor and the AHEC program office. 

    OBJECTIVE 5:  Students will be able to argue whether the location of the patient population affects the health of the patient based on experiencing the health care delivery model in both a community setting and a hospital/campus setting.

    OBJECTIVE 6: At the conclusion of the rotation, the student will be able to formulate an enhanced differential diagnosis of a chief complaint.  This will be accomplished by through reading, other self-learning modalities, and practical knowledge gained during the rotation. 

     

     

    Project Assessment:

                    Assessment of the new goal and objectives will be done via My Evaluation.  This is a school based assessment system which teachers/preceptors use.  It is based on ACGME requirements.

     

    Resources for Learning:

                    Participating Faculty:  Course Director, practicing local or AHEC Primary Care Physicians

    Texts:  Recommendations of the preceptor; whatever the fundamental text book is for the specialty such as Nelsons Textbook of Pediatrics for those doing a rotation with a Pediatrician

                    Hands-on-Experience:  Supervised evaluation of the patients seen in the primary care setting.

    Website:  www.lsushcshreveport.edu/ahec; on Moodle, we need to list the text books relevant to each primary care specialty

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    HOURS PER WEEK

    CONF                           HRS        WARD                     HRS        LAB                           HRS      LIBRARY                      HRS PRECEPTOR                 HRS        CLINIC                      HRS     LECTURE                  HRS            READING                      HRS

    TOTAL NUMBER OF HOURS PER WEEK: 40+                

    Blocks 1 - 11

    Pass/Fail

  
  •  

    SELECT SAHEC - Community (AHEC)


    SELECTIVE CATEGORY: Community
    SELECTIVE DIRECTOR: Dr. Wanda Thomas Phone - 318.675.5770
    ADMINISTRATIVE CONTACT: Shirley L. Wilson Phone- 318-675-8963
    AHEC Office (Shreveport Program Office ) Medical School, Rm. 5-302
    LOCATION: Private Practice Physicians in various communities in Louisiana
    NUMBER OF STUDENTS PER 4 WEEK BLOCK: Maximum of seven students per AHEC site per block
    SELECTIVE AVAILABLE DURING BLOCKS: Blocks 1-11
    COURSE CODE: SAHEC

    1 credit

       Application REQUIRED at registration. Only students with confirmed placement will be allowed to complete rotation under

       AHEC.

       Available on web at http://www.lsuhscshreveport.edu/Education/othertraining/ahec/index

     

    NOTE: THIS SELECTIVE MAY NOT BE DROPPED WITHIN 1 MONTH OF THE STARTING DATE.

     

    Goal: The student will have the opportunity to observe and participate in all aspects of the practice of primary care medicine in a community setting, not limited to metropolitan, underserved or rural areas.  The student will gain both knowledge and insight into the practice of primary care medicine in one of the above listed settings.

    OBJECTIVE 1:  The student will obtain and write a problem focused history on a patient.  He will then describe the problem focused physical exam findings and the management plan developed.  The preceptor will critique the write up and give formal written feedback.

    OBJECTIVE 2:  The student will compare and contrast how common disease processes are diagnosed and managed in an academic institution as opposed to a community primary care setting. One of the disease processes will be written up and turned into the program office upon completion of the rotation.

    OBJECTIVE 3:  The student will learn to differentiate between documentation requirements for billing and reimbursement for community primary care settings and those required in an academic/hospital setting.

    OBJECTIVE 4:  The student will create a successful community practice planned based on his experience in a community primary care clinic. The practice plan will include time management, the doctor-patient relationship, office management and medical economics, medico-legal issues and risk reduction, appropriate referral practices, and continuing education.  This practice plan will be reviewed and critiqued by the preceptor and the AHEC program office. 

    OBJECTIVE 5:  Students will be able to argue whether the location of the patient population affects the health of the patient based on experiencing the health care delivery model in both a community setting and a hospital/campus setting.

    OBJECTIVE 6: At the conclusion of the rotation, the student will be able to formulate an enhanced differential diagnosis of a chief complaint.  This will be accomplished by through reading, other self-learning modalities, and practical knowledge gained during the rotation.  

    OBJECTIVE 7: Students will select one of 6 core topics; Inter-professional Education, Behavioral Health Integration, Social Determinants of Health, Cultural Competency, Practice Transformation or Current and emerging health issues as a topic of discussion based on one’s rotation in a rural or underserved primary care practice. At a designated time all Selective/Elective students will share their experiences and the better understanding they gained of one of the core topics during the rotation.

     

     

     

    Project Assessment:

                    Assessment of the new goal and objectives will be done via My Evaluation.  This is a school based assessment system which teachers/preceptors use.  It is based on ACGME requirements.

     

    Resources for Learning:

                    Participating Faculty:  Course Director, practicing local or AHEC Primary Care Physicians

    Texts:  Recommendations of the preceptor; whatever the fundamental text book is for the specialty such as Nelsons Textbook of Pediatrics for those doing a rotation with a Pediatrician

                    Hands-on-Experience:  Supervised evaluation of the patients seen in the primary care setting.

    Website:  www.lsushcshreveport.edu/ahec; on Moodle, we need to list the text books relevant to each primary care specialty



    Blocks 1-11

    Pass/Fail


Anatomy

  
  •  

    ANAT 6522 - Human Anatomy


    5 Credits

    Lectures of cell, tissue, organ and body-systems structure, and dissection of human cadaver with emphasis on structure and function of neuromuscular and skeletal systems.

  
  •  

    ANAT 6533 - Neuroanatomy


    3 Credits

    A study of anatomy of the central and peripheral nervous systems with emphasis on structures commonly involved in pathological conditions that impact function.


Anesthesiology

  
  •  

    ANES 300 - Anesthesiology


    Olga Willett, M.D., Clerkship Director
    Katherine Stammen, M.D., Co-Clerkship Director

    2 credit hours

    The Anesthesiology Clerkship consists of a 2-week rotation for the 3rd year medical students in the Department of Anesthesiology with the LSU Sciences Center. Our ultimate goal is to make this an excellent clinical learning experience for the medical student by: introducing the medical student to basic principles and practices of Anesthesiology; providing basic information on resuscitation, including the basics of intravenous access and safe airway management; educating the medical student on how to evaluate patients preoperatively, as well as post operatively; and, teaching the medical student fundamental aspects of anesthetics management

  
  •  

    ELECT EANEA-EANEB - Clinical Correlations in Anesthesiology


    ELECTIVE DIRECTOR(S): Evangelyn Okereke , M.D. PHONE: 318.675.7585
    DURATION OF ELECTIVE: 2 Weeks or 4 Weeks ADMINISTRATIVE CONTACT: Trish Kennedy
    LOCATION OF ELECTIVE: OR Phone: 318.626-1564, E-43
    MAXIMUM NUMBER OF STUDENTS: 3 (combined total for both 2 or 4 week)
    ELECTIVE OFFERED DURING BLOCKS: All except I and II
    COURSE CODES: EANEA(4 week code) -EANEB (2 week code)

    .5-1 credit

    OBJECTIVES

     

    The medical student will be exposed to:

    •  Techniques of preoperative evaluation to recognize those patients and situations that pose an increased anesthetic risk;

    •  Optimal preoperative therapy for such patients to minimize this risk;

    •  The characteristics of commonly used anesthetic agents and techniques and their risks and complications, and;

    •  The principles and skills involved in airway management, intraoperative fluid therapy, and the proper use of intraoperative monitors.

     

    GOALS

     

     

            To be able to intubate patients from pre-op to intubation and be able to evaluate patient for potential risk factors.

     

    SPECIFIC DUTIES OF SENIOR STUDENTS

     

    A student will be assigned to a full-time mentor. Under his/her guidance, the student will evaluate a patient, design an anesthetic, conduct the anesthetic, and evaluate the patient’s postoperative care. As more skill and understanding is gained, more responsibility for the care of the patient will be delegated.

     

                    One week - OB                                                                       One week - Neuro

                    One week - Cardiac Thoracic & Vascular surgery                 One week - Peds/Regional

                    Attend at least one lecture on APS during their rotation

     

    READING ASSIGNMENTS

     

    Stoelting RK & Miller RD, eds. Basics of Anesthesia, latest edition.

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    HOURS PER WEEK

    CONF            3           HRS        WARD                     HRS        LAB                           HRS      LIBRARY                      HRS

    OR       40         HRS                    CLINIC                      HRS        LECTURE         2         HRS     READING                      HRS

    TOTAL NUMBER OF HOURS PER WEEK:   45              

    All except blocks 1 and 2

    Pass/Fail

  
  •  

    ELECT EANRS - Clinical Research in Anesthesiology


    ELECTIVE DIRECTOR(S): Elyse Cornett, M.D. ADMINISTRATIVE CONTACT: Trish Kennedy
    DURATION OF ELECTIVE: 2 or 4 Weeks 4th Fl. Hospital - Rm. 4E-26
    LOCATION OF ELECTIVE: dependent on current research Phone 318.626.1564
    MAXIMUM NUMBER OF STUDENTS: 1
    ELECTIVE OFFERED DURING BLOCKS: 2-11
    COURSE NUMBER: EANRS (4 week code) or EANRS2 (2 week code)
    MUST HAVE PRIOR CONSENT TO SCHEDULE - Please see the area in Moodle

    1 credit

    OBJECTIVES

     

    • The medical student will be responsible for reviewing literature regarding research including but not limited to the informed consent process, the IRB and basic information regarding clinical research

     

    • The student will assist in any on-going research in the department

     

    GOALS

    • The student researcher will submit and work on an approved research project involving anesthesia in the LSUHSC OR under the supervision of a department faculty member.The student may also work with ongoing clinical research studies in anesthesia or acute/chronic pain management, under the supervision of a department faculty physician.

     

    • The overall goal of this rotation will be to instruct the student in clinical research techniques and medical literature publication.

     

     

    SPECIFIC DUTIES OF SENIOR STUDENTS

     

    • IRB and HRPP online training certifications
    • Journal Club
    • Department of Anesthesiology (Tuesdays at 630AM, 4h floor lecture hall)
    • Department of Pharmacology, Toxicology & Neuroscience (Wednesdays at 1:00PM, room 5-201)
    •  
    • Department of Anesthesiology (Tuesdays at 630AM, 4h floor lecture hall)
    • Department of Pharmacology, Toxicology & Neuroscience (Tuesdays at 4:00PM, room 5-201)
    • Learn critical evaluation of manuscripts
    • Presentation resources (journal clubs, poster presentations)
    • Assist in ongoing departmental research and manuscript writing

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    HOURS PER WEEK

    CONF                                  HRS

     

     

     

    WARD                                       HRS                         LAB                                          HRS                         LIBRARY                                HRS

     

    OR                                       HRS

     

    CLINIC                                      HRS                         LECTURE                               HRS

     

    READING                                 HRS

     

    TOTAL NUMBER OF HOURS PER WEEK    40 hrs                              

     

    All

    Pass/Fail


Biochemistry and Molecular Biology

  
  •  

    BIOCH 207 - Introduction to Special Methods of Research


    1-6 Credits, (Credit to be specified at time of registration.)

    Theoretical discussions and laboratory work in an area of research methodology, directed by an expert in the use of the method.

  
  •  

    BIOCH 223 - Physical Biochemistry


    2 Credits

    Discussions of physical and chemical techniques used to study macromolecular architecture and interactions.

  
  •  

    BIOCH 271 - Biochemistry, Special Topics in Cell Signaling


    1 Credit

    Description: This course is a one credit course designed from current literature. The topic of the course will change for each offering. The format of the course is lecture and discussion, with the latter led by students. Here will be two or three subtopics for each offering. Each subtopic will be introduced by a lecture from one of the faculty directors, followed by discussion. The next meeting concerning that subtopic will be led by a student, with each participant presenting a paper dealing with one aspect of the subtopic.

  
  •  

    BIOCH 281 - Molecular Mechanisms of Posttranscriptional Control


    1 Credit

    A literature-based course on the molecular mechanisms associated with posttranscriptional control. Course material will be derived from the current literature and will focus on the most recent findings concerning splicing, polyadenylation, mRNA stability, translation, and protein targeting.

  
  •  

    BIOCH 282 - Topics in Biochemistry and Molecular Biology:Current Topics in Protein Chemistry


    1 Credit

    A series of lectures on state-of-the-art approaches to studying proteins and their functions. This will include protein structure, protein folding and protein-ligand interactions.

  
  •  

    BIOCH 283 - Topics in Biochemistry and Molecular Biology: Molecular Mechanisms of Transcriptional Control


    1 Credit

    A literature-based course covering the role of promoter-specific activators and repressors, the nature and role of the general transcriptional machinery, and the role of nucleosomes and higher-order chromatin structures in regulating transcription.

  
  •  

    BIOCH 285 - Topics in Biochemistry and Molecular Biology: Eukaryotic Developmental Biology.


    1 Credit

    A literature-based course that is focused on developmental regulatory mechanisms in higher animals. Topics include cell fate specification, differentiation, and pattern formation.

  
  •  

    BIOCH 286 - Topics in Biochemistry and Molecular Biology: Classical and Molecular Genetics.


    1 Credit

    This course will emphasize classical genetic methods as they apply to modern molecular biology. The course content will rely on yeast as an experimental organism, although the intent is to teach genetic principles as they apply to eukaryotic organisms in general.

  
  •  

    BIOCH 287 - Topics in Biochemistry and Molecular Biology: Applications of Spectroscopic Techniques to Biochemical Problems


    1 Credit

    Lectures cover the use of state-of-the-art spectroscopic techniques to deduce kinetic and mechanistic aspects of proteins and nucleic acids.

  
  •  

    BIOCH 288 - Scientific Writing


    1 Credit

    A course designed to teach the fundamentals of writing and critiquing scientific papers and grant proposals. This includes the identification of topics and laboratory approaches suitable for development in grant proposals.

  
  •  

    BIOCH 290 - Introduction to Bioinformatics


    3 Credits

    This course is designed to provide an introduction to the computational and biological concepts and skills required for the field of bioinformatics. It provides an overview of the field and trains students in the use of some current bioinformatics programs. Some topics to be covered are biological data bases, pairwise sequence alignment BLAST searching, analysis of gene expression data, proteomics, multiple sequence alignment, protein structure prediction, molecular phylogeny, genomic analysis, and PERL for bioinformatics. By the end of the course students should be able to search for novel genes of unknown function, identify homologous proteins, and develop hypotheses regarding the function of novel genes.

  
  •  

    BIOCH 298 - Journal Club


    1 Credit

    Each year, all doctoral students are expected to make a one hour presentation from the current literature and to participate in all journal club meetings scheduled in the Fall and Spring semesters. First and second year students should choose a faculty advisor who is not their dissertation or rotation director to advise in choice of topic and to critique the journal club both prior to and after the presentation. Senior level students, although not registered for BCH 298, are expected to continue full participation in the Journal Club, including presenting once each year.

  
  •  

    BIOCH 299 - Research Seminar


    1 Credit

    This course offers credit for participation in the departmental seminar program and student seminar program. Each student is expected to present a formal research seminar on their research project at least once during his/her degree candidacy and to participate in all departmental seminars scheduled in the Fall and Spring semesters.

  
  •  

    BIOCH 300 - Thesis Research


    1-6 Credits

    This course offers credit for research work applied towards the M.S. Degree.

  
  •  

    BIOCH 400 - Dissertation Research


    1-9 Credits

    This course provides students credit for their research work applied to their Ph.D. dissertation.


Cellular Biology and Anatomy

  
  •  

    CEBIO 200C - Integrative Structural Biology: Histology


    3 Credits

    An introduction to the microscopic anatomy and function of human tissues.

  
  •  

    CEBIO 216 - Human Developmental Biology


    3 Credits

    Three hours of lecture. Lectures on human development correlated with films and laboratory demonstrations Participation of students will be encouraged in the form of discussions and presentations.

  
  •  

    CEBIO 223 - Molecular Basis of Disease


    2 Credits

    Faculty member in charge: Kevin McCarthy, Ph.D., Cellular Biology and Anatomy. The course will serve to integrate basic science knowledge obtained by students in first year of graduate school with mechanisms of disease progression. The course will consist of five modules. Module 1, taught by the basis science faculty in the Division of Research of the Department of Pathology, will consist of 10 hours of lectures on the cellular response to disease from the basic science perspective i.e. the integration of the basic science information gained in year 1 of the curriculum into the context of disease initiation and progression. Modules 2 through 5 will focus on four “benchmark” diseases. Each module will consist of seven lectures, two of which will be given by Faculty with significant expertise in the clinical manifestations of the disease (basic pathology and pathophysiology) and five by the Basic Science Faculty within the Division of Research in Pathology. The pathology and pathophysiology aspects of the course will emphasize: 1) what is known about the disease from a clinical perspective; 2) unanswered clinical questions that need to be addressed from a basic science perspective. The Basic Science Faculty involved in the course will give lectures that 1) summarize what is known about the basic mechanisms of disease initiation and progression; 2) discussion how adverse modulation of well known cellular pathways/events contributes to disease progression; 3) provide insights to necessary venues of translational research. This course will be run within the Pathology track of the graduate program in the Department of Cell Biology and Anatomy.

  
  •  

    CEBIO 224 - Molecular Basis of Disease Journal Club


    1 Credit

    Faculty member in charge: Kevin McCarthy, Ph.D., Cellular Biology and Anatomy. The journal club, which has been a constant weekly meeting in the Department of Pathology since 1997, serves to integrate basic science knowledge with mechanisms of disease progression. The journal club will consist of weekly presentations and discussions by students and faculty of current research reports. For student enrolled in the Cell Biology Course “Molecular Basis of Disease” enrollment in the journal club is mandatory. Each student will be expected to present and discuss at least one paper during the semester. Evaluation criteria for students enrolled in the journal club for academic credit include the quality of student presentations and the student participation in weekly discussions during the journal club. This course will be run within the Pathology track of the graduate program in the Department of Cell Biology and Anatomy. At present the role in the course development is primarily faculty members with joint appointments in the Departments of Cell Biology and Anatomy and Pathology.

  
  •  

    CEBIO 230 - Experimental Cell Biology 1


    3 Credits

    Lecture and laboratory course for the design and implementation of experiments in cell biology. Includes instruction in animal handling and care, morphologic tissue preparation, computerized image-analysis, experimental design, data management and prepublication preparation. The course involves extensive student involvement and a laboratory report.

  
  •  

    CEBIO 250 - Research Methods


    2-8 Credits

    A laboratory course in which students rotate through selected faculty-research laboratories and become acquainted with the research techniques and laboratory routines in each.

  
  •  

    CEBIO 260 - Comprehensive Human Structural Biology


    5 Credits

    This is a lecture and human dissection based course, which aim is to provide and in-depth knowledge of the structure and function of the human body. The course consists of 37 lecture hours and 39 dissection laboratories of two hours each. There will be four multiple-choice exams and four practical exams based on the topics covered.

  
  •  

    CEBIO 261 - Human Structural Biology (Body Cavities)


    3 Credits

    In this course, students will be given a total of 24 lecture hours during which they will be presented with the structures of the organs contained within the thoracic, abdominal, and pelvic cavities as well as with the topographic relationships existing between these organs and the their blood and nerve supply. In a total of 15 laboratories of 2 or 3 hours each, students will dissect a human body to demonstrate the structures discussed during lectures. There will be two exams made up of multiple choice and essay questions and two practical exams in which the students will have to identify tagged structures on a human cadaver.

  
  •  

    CEBIO 262 - Human Structural Biology (Musculoskeletal and Head & Neck)


    3 Credits

    In this course, students will be given a total of 22 lecture hours during which they will learn the different components of the musculoskeletal system of the entire human body as well as the structures of the head and neck. Students will also be given an in depth knowledge of the topographic relationships existing between the structures of the head and neck and will learn the blood and nerve supply of the musculoskeletal system and of the head and neck. In a total of 19 laboratories of 2 or 3 hours each, students will dissect a human body to demonstrate the structures discussed during lectures. There will be three exams made up of multiple choice and essay questions and three practical exams in which the students will have to identify tagged structures on a human cadaver.

  
  •  

    CEBIO 265 - Human Neuroanatomy


    2 Credits

    The course is designed to meet the specific needs of graduate students for knowledge of the structure and function of the human nervous system. The course is divided into two parts - (1) Neurohistology & Sensory Systems, and (2) Motor Systems & Cerebral Cortex. Lectures are complemented with a wet laboratory in which whole brains and spinal cords are examined, and with other laboratory material in the form of color slides of horizontal and coronal brain sections and illustrations of ventricles, meninges and neurohistology. Didactic information is reinforced as students work through sample case studies. There are two written exams and two practicals.

  
  •  

    CEBIO 266 - Essential Neuroanatomy for Basic Scientists


    2 credits

    A lecture- and laboratory-based neuroanatomy course tailored for graduate students, which provides comprehensive information on 1) histology of the nervous system; 2) sensory systems; 3) motor systems; 4) cerebral cortex. The course also includes labs in which rodent and human systems are compared.

  
  •  

    CEBIO 289 - Current Topics in Cell Biology


    1 Credit

    In the fall and spring semesters, students will participate in a course offered in the format of a journal club, in which significant recent contributions to the research literature are discussed. This course offers students an opportunity to keep abreast of current research and to develop public speaking skills. The interpretation of results and critical analysis of experimental data will be emphasized. May be repeated for credit.

  
  •  

    CEBIO 290 - Seminar


    1 Credit

    Students will attend and participate in the seminars conducted by the Department of Cellular Biology and Anatomy. Periodically, each student will prepare and present to the group a seminar on the subject topic under discussion at that particular period of time. Emphasis will be placed upon such subjects as fine structure, correlation of biochemical information with ultrastructure, and the cytophysiology of the various organ systems.

  
  •  

    CEBIO 299 - Research Proposal in Anatomy


    3 Credits

    A required course for all doctoral candidates in which the student prepares, in National Institutes of Health grant applications format, a written proposal on the candidate’s doctoral problem. The proposal is comprised of sections on a) Background of the problems, b) specific aims. c) rationale of the experimental approach, (d preliminary findings, e) experimental methods. This proposal will be reviewed by the student’s major advisor and examining committee. After the proposal is approved, the student may continue dissertation research. Deviations from the program outlined in the proposal must be approved by the student’s examining committee.

  
  •  

    CEBIO 300 - Thesis Research


    1-6 Credits

    Registration by permission of the Head of the Department. Amount of credit to be stated at time of registration. Laboratory investigation which the student conducts to acquire information for the presentation to the faculty of a thesis is a necessary part of graduate study.

  
  •  

    CEBIO 400 - Dissertation Research


    1-9 Credits

    Registration by permission of the Head of the Department. Amount of credit to be stated at the time of registration. Laboratory investigation of the problem selected by the student for the student’s doctoral dissertation must be pursued by every candidate.

  
  •  

    ELECT EANAB - Three Dimensional Anatomy


    ELECTIVE DIRECTOR(S): Sumitra Miriyala, Ph.D. PHONE: 318.675.5319 8-217
    DURATION OF ELECTIVE: 2 Weeks ADMINISTRATIVE CONTACT:
    LOCATION OF ELECTIVE: Human Anatomy Lab (8-333) Phone: 318.675.5312
    MAXIMUM NUMBER OF STUDENTS: 8/Block MINIMUM NUMBER OF STUDENTS: 1
    ELECTIVE OFFERED DURING BLOCKS: 3-9 only
    COURSE CODE: EANAB

    .5 credit

    THIS COURSE IS DESIGNED FOR STUDENTS ENTERING SURGICAL SPECIALTIES AND SUBSPECIALTIES OR RADIOLOGY

     

    OBJECTIVE

    The student will demonstrate the ability to visualize a specific anatomical region in three dimensions by performing a complete dissection in one of five anatomical regions (head & neck, thorax, abdomen, pelvis-perineum, or joints), then correlate the dissection with axial sections of the area as viewed in the Netanatomy atlas.

     

    GOAL

     

                  The student, through cadaveric dissection and exploration of axial sections, will gain a detailed understanding of the three dimensional anatomy of a specific region of the body.

     

    TEXTS

                    Anatomy Atlas: Netter, Grants or Thieme

                 Axial Section Atlas: Netanatomy.com

                  Anatomage Table

     

     

    SPECIFIC DUTIES OF SENIOR STUDENTS

     

    The student will demonstrate their dissection to the Anatomy Course Director and will take an oral quiz where the student will identify all structures in the dissected area including the vascular and nerve supply and duct systems. The student will also identify and demonstrate the three dimensional relationships between the identified structures on the dissected area and on the axial sections of the area provided by the Netanatomy atlas and Anatomage Table.

     

    It is the student’s responsibility to contact Dr. Sumitra Miriyala (smiriy@lsuhsc.edu) prior to the first day of the course to schedule a brief orientation meeting regarding the specific dissection and expectations.    

                Please include your specialty in this initial email.

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    HOURS PER WEEK

    CONF                      HRS           WARD                     HRS        LAB           15                HRS      LIBRARY                      HRS

    OR                  HRS                    CLINIC                      HRS        LECTURE                  HRS     READING        5              HRS

    TOTAL NUMBER OF HOURS PER WEEK:                 

    Blocks 3-9 only

    Pass/Fail


Cardiopulmonary Science

  
  •  

    CPSC 3100 - Respiratory Care Fundamentals


    1 Credit

    Lecture & laboratory course designed to introduce students to various aspects of respiratory therapy. Course content includes a review of medical terminology along with discussions related to ethical and legal issues encountered in the allied health sciences, HIPAA training, body mechanics and positioning, assessing vital signs, orientation to the cardiopulmonary science curriculum, professional credentials, and professional expectations for the students.

  
  •  

    CPSC 3122 - Human Anatomy


    4 Credits

    Lecture / laboratory course of study on cell, tissue, organ and body system structures and prosection of human cadaver with emphasis on structures and functions of the cardiopulmonary system.

  
  •  

    CPSC 3123 - Human Physiology


    3 Credits

    Lecture/ laboratory course of study on normal physiological functions of cell, tissue, and organ systems with emphasis on the body’s maintenance of homeostasis.

  
  •  

    CPSC 3200 - Respiratory Therapy Fundamentals II


    3 Credits

    Lecture/laboratory course covering general principles of respiratory-care modalities and techniques. This is a continuation of CPSC 3100 .

  
  •  

    CPSC 3220 - Cardiopulmonary Physiology


    3 Credits

    This course presents a detailed analysis of cardiopulmonary physiology. The emphasis is placed on structure and function of the cardiopulmonary system. Clinical application to enhance and understanding of the normal cardiopulmonary function will be presented when appropriate.

  
  •  

    CPSC 3250 - Clinical Applications & Procedures I


    2 Credits

    Clinical instruction in respiratory care procedures. Emphasis is placed on routine patient care, including such modalities as cardiopulmonary resuscitation, airway management, oxygen therapy, use of medicated aerosols, humidity devices and bronchial hygiene techniques.

  
  •  

    CPSC 3262 - Clinical Seminar I


    1 Credit

    This case-based, student led discussion course allows the respiratory care student the opportunity to apply theory to clinical practice. Emphasis will be placed on bridging concepts learned in CPSC 3200  and CPSC 3250 .

  
  •  

    CPSC 3263 - Cardiopulmonary Pathophysiology and Pharmacologic Therapy I


    3 Credits

    This is an introductory course in the assessment and clinical management of cardiopulmonary disease and pharmacologic interventions. The course will begin with overview of basic assessment skills and basic pharmacology principles to include drug administration and metabolism, drug calculations and an overview of autonomic nervous system. The course will cover cardiopulmonary disease and pharmacologic interventions that are seen in general care of adults and pediatrics.

  
  •  

    CPSC 3300 - Neonatology and Pediatrics


    3 Credits

    Lecture series designed to cover the development of the cardiopulmonary system from embryo to puberty. Emphasis includes the diagnosis and treatment of various cardiopulmonary disorders of the infant and pediatric patient.

  
  •  

    CPSC 3310 - Clinical Application and Procedures II


    2 Credits

    A continuation of the lecture-laboratory course CPSC 3342 , which introduced the concepts of advanced respiratory care medicine. Emphasis is placed on clinical application of advanced concepts, care and assessment of the adult patient with critical illness, monitoring and implementation of life-support systems, and care and assessment of the emergency department patient.

  
  •  

    CPSC 3330 - Cardiopulmonary Diagnostics I


    2 Credits

    Lecture/laboratory course covering basic instrumentation and diagnostic techniques employed in assessment of pulmonary function, metabolic studies, and noninvasive and invasive diagnostic techniques.

  
  •  

    CPSC 3332 - Cardiopulmonary Diagnostics II


    2 Credit

    This course emphasizes the theory and interpretation of the 12 lead electrocardiogram and other non-invasive cardiac tests.

  
  •  

    CPSC 3342 - Critical Care Concepts I


    2 Credits

    Lecture/ laboratory course providing the respiratory care student with advanced respiratory skills in the care of the adult patient with critical illness. Emphasis is placed on care of the patient on life-support systems, care of the patient in the emergency department, and care of the post surgical patient.

  
  •  

    CPSC 3362 - Clinical Seminar II


    1 Credit

    This case-based, student led discussion course allows the respiratory care student the opportunity to apply advanced respiratory care theory to clinical practice. Emphasis will be placed on bridging concepts learned in CPSC 3342  and CPSC 3310 .

  
  •  

    CPSC 3363 - Cardiopulmonary Pathophysiology and Pharmacologic Therapy II


    3 Credits

    This is a continuation of CPSC 3263 . The course will cover the cardiopulmonary disorder, along with the pharmacologic therapy that is seen with the critically ill patient.

  
  •  

    CPSC 3400 - Clinical Application and Procedures III


    2 Credits

    Clinical instruction in advanced respiratory care procedures. Emphasis is placed on adult and neonatal critical care procedures. This course includes completing American Heart Association’s Advanced Cardiac Life Support course.

  
  •  

    CPSC 4050 - Cardiopulmonary Pathophysiology II


    3 Credits

    A continuation of CPSC 3320 with emphasis on cardiovascular disease processes and how these entities affect cardiovascular functions. Emphasis shall be placed on patient assessment and clinical management of each disease entity.

  
  •  

    CPSC 4062 - Cardiovascular Diagnostics


    6 Credits

    A lecture/laboratory course designed to introduce the student to various diagnostic cardiovascular procedures, including echocardiography, cardiac auscultation, nuclear cardiology, and cardiac catheterization. Major emphasis is placed upon ultrasound physics as well as two-dimensional, M-mode, and Doppler echocardiograph techniques.

  
  •  

    CPSC 4072 - Clinical Seminar III


    1 Credit

    A lecture-discussion course focusing on preparing the CPS student for professional examinations in respiratory care. In addition, this course will apply problem-based learning strategies for studying advanced topics in respiratory care.

  
  •  

    CPSC 4080 - Clinical Applications & Procedures IV


    2 Credits

    Clinical instruction in respiratory care, education, cardiovascular diagnostic procedures. Emphasis is placed on echocardiography. Assisting with clinical instruction of respiratory care students, and caring for the patient requiring long-term respiratory care.

  
  •  

    CPSC 4152 - Cardiopulmonary Specialty Topic


    3 Credits

    The course allows additional clinical instruction in area of student’s choice with program director approval. Areas for additional clinical instruction to include: adult, pediatric, neonatal respiratory care, echocardiography, managerial / educational processes and clinical rotations with Department of Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine.

  
  •  

    CPSC 4160 - Cardiopulmonary Rehabilitation and Home Care


    2 Credits

    Lecture/laboratory course designed to introduce students to the care of chronically ill patients. Discussions will focus on the delivery of cardiopulmonary services for hospital-based cardiopulmonary rehabilitation programs, extended care facilities, and home care. Topics include clinical exercise testing, exercise prescriptions, clinical practice guidelines for management of patients who require long term Respiratory Care (e.g., oxygen therapy, bronchodilator therapy, mechanical ventilation, etc.).

  
  •  

    CPSC 4170 - Clinical Applications & Procedures V


    2 Credits

    Course is to provide clinical instruction in diagnostic and theraputic techniques utilized in cardiopulmonary medicine. The student will be assisting with the clinical instruction of students in the advanced respiratory care setting of the intensive care unit.

  
  •  

    CPSC 4180 - Professional Development in the Health Sciences


    4 Credits

    Lecture / laboratory course provides an overview of health management, education, professionalism and ethics for the respiratory care provider. Emphasis is placed on preparing the cardiopulmonary science student for various employment opportunities.

  
  •  

    CPSC 4190 - Introduction to Research and Statistical Analysis


    3 Credits

    Lecture course to discuss the basic principles of research to include IRB processes, basic statistical analysis, research design and review of the clinical research to support evidenced based medicine.


Emergency Medicine

  
  •  

    ELECT EOEMA - Outpatient Clinic Emergency Medicine


    DIRECTOR FOURTH YEAR DEPARTMENT COURSES: Gregory Patek, M.D.
    ELECTIVE DIRECTOR: Gregory Patek, M.D., Phone - 626-2325; Rm. XG-5; Dept. of Emergency Medicine
    ADMINISTRATIVE CONTACT: Beverly Davidson, Administrative Assistant, 626-2325; Rm. XG-5; Dept of Emergency Medicine
    LOCATION: University Health - Shreveport
    NUMBER OF STUDENTS PER 4 WEEK BLOCK: 4 ELECTIVE AVAILABLE DURING BLOCKS: Blocks 1-10
    COURSE CODE: EOEMA

    1 credit

    Primary Goals:

     

    The primary goal of this rotation is to teach medical students how to recognize and manage acute life-threatening conditions.  Our secondary goal is to develop the diagnostic skills necessary to evaluate patients with common symptoms such as chest pain or abdominal pain. Other goals of this four-week elective in Emergency Medicine are to enhance the student’s:

    1. Knowledge of the fundamental principles of medicine

    2. Understanding of the fundamental concepts and skills learned in the 3rd year clerkships

    3. Basic knowledge of the pathophysiology, clinical presentation, assessment and treatment and interpretation of diagnostic tests of major and common disease problems presenting to the emergency department

    4. Skills of medical history taking and general physical examination

    5. Foundation for continuing education and lifelong learning skills

     

    These objectives will be accomplished by having the student participate as a member of the health-care team under the direct supervision of Emergency Department (ED) faculty. The student will be expected to become familiar with the following skills:

    •  Initial evaluation (history and physical examination) of a patient presenting to the ED with undifferentiated non-urgent, urgent or emergent illness or injury.

        •  Basic steps of resuscitation and stabilization of patients

    •  Development of a differential diagnosis for common presenting complaints in the ED setting such as:

    Chest pain                                                                  Fever

    Shortness of Breath                                                   Dysuria

    Dizziness                                                                   Hematuria

    Headache                                                                  Vomiting

    Abdominal pain                                                          Sore throat

    Minor trauma                                                              Altered mental status

     

    Specific Objectives:

     

    1. Students will provide primary contact with patients under direct faculty supervision.

    •  Students will be under the supervision of ED faculty who are always present in the Emergency Care Center

    •  The history, physical examination and differential diagnosis will be presented to the faculty at each patient encounter.  This will establish a teaching dialogue between faculty and student.

     

    2. Medical history and physical examination skills will be improved.

    •  The opportunity for bedside teaching regarding history-taking and physical examination skills will be avail- able at each student/patient encounter.

     

    3. Students will learn to perform a focused history and physical examination pertinent to what is needed for their patients.

    •  The concept of a focused history and physical examination as it relates to the “Chief Complaint” is integral to the practice of Emergency Medicine and will be taught to all students.

     

    •  Students will be taught to perform a rapid but thorough physical examination.

     

     

    4. General medical knowledge and disease-specific information for common and major medical problems treated

     

    •  Students will utilize a variety of resources including standard texts and computer-based resources to enhance their knowledge of specific disease processes as they are encountered.

    •  Hands-on workshops will be presented covering a variety of Emergency Medicine topics:

    ♦  ”Wound care and suturing techniques”

    ♦   ”Basic Splinting”

    ♦   ”Intubation and Emergency Airway Skills”

    ♦   ”Cervical Spine Evaluation”

    ♦   ”Emergency Procedures”

    ♦   ”Medical Record Documentation”

    •  Students will also attend the weekly department lecture series covering Core Emergency Medicine topics

    ♦   Altered Mental Status

    ♦   Approach to Poisoning

    ♦   Approach to Trauma

    ♦   Chest Pain

    ♦   Shock

    ♦   Respiratory Failure

    ♦   Common Infections

    ♦   Emergency Psychiatry

    ♦   Abdominal Pain in the Emergency Department

    ♦   Gynecologic Disorders and Emergencies

    ♦   Medical-Legal Aspects of Emergency Medicine

    ♦   ENT & Dental Emergencies

    ♦   Urologic Disorders and Emergencies

    ♦   Pediatric Emergencies

    ♦   Dermatology in the Emergency Department

     

    5. Students will learn about aspects of preventative medical care.

    •  The student will be educated on follow-up instructions and patient education regarding their disease process at the conclusion of each patient encounter.

    •  The importance of immunization status and recommendations regarding rabies, tetanus and influenza will be emphasized during the rotation.

    •  Breaking the Cycle of Domestic Violence - awareness, recognition and prevention of intimate partner abuse, child abuse and elder neglect/abuse will be highlighted during this rotation

     

    6. Learn documentation requirements.

    •  In addition to the documentation workshop, each student chart will be reviewed by a faculty member prior to disposition of the patient from the Emergency Department.

     

    7. Exposure to effects of social, cultural and societal problems and issues on health.

    •  During the rotation the student will interact with various organizations:

    ♦   LSUHSC Social Services

    ♦   LSUHSC Pastoral Care

    ♦   Adult and Child Protective Services

    ♦   YWCA Spouse Abuse and Domestic Violence Program

    ♦   The Rape Crisis Center

    ♦   STEPS Chemical Dependency Detox Program

    ♦   Animal Control Center

    ♦   Louisiana Poison Control Center

    ♦   Shreveport/Bossier Rescue Mission

    ♦   Alcoholic’s Anonymous

     

     

     

     

    Resources for learning:

     

    Participating Faculty:

    ♦   All Emergency Department Faculty Attendings

    Texts:

    ♦   Study Guide of Emergency Medicine- Judith Tintinalli.

    ♦   Emergency Medicine- Concepts and Clinical Practice- Peter Rosen.

    ♦   5-Minute Emergency Medicine Consult.

    ♦   e-Medicine, web-based emergency medicine text- Adler and Plantz. (This peer reviewed, web-based text will be utilized at the bedside at the time of each patient encounter. This will foster the development of lifelong learning skills in the student.)

     

     

    Workshops:

    •  ”Wound care and suturing techniques” -will provide students with the basic skills required for management of routine wounds seen in the ED setting.

    •  ”Basic Splinting” - will teach students how to apply splinting material and manage many common orthopedic injuries.

    •  ”Intubation and Emergency Airway Skills” -this workshop will teach students to recognize situations of potential airway compromise and develop the motor skills required to obtain a secure airway in the emergent situation.

    •  ”Cervical Spine Evaluation” - will explore physical examination findings, mechanisms of injury and radiographic evaluation of the cervical spine in the trauma setting.

    •  ”Emergency Procedures” -will teach indications, contraindications, risks, complications, techniques and landmarks for several emergency procedures including central venous access, lumbar puncture, thoracostomy and arterial access.

    •  ”Medical Record Documentation” - this workshop will introduce the student to the computerized documentation system utilized in the ED and emphasize important medical/legal aspects of ED charting.

    •  Lumbar puncture workshop

     

    Hands-on Experience:

    •  Bedside supervision of physical examinations and simple procedures will be provided by the Faculty after the student has shown proficiency in the practice workshops.

     

    Directed Readings: Emergency Medicine: A comprehensive Study Guide - Companion Handbook,  David Cline

    (recommended)

     

    Self-Directed Learning:

    •  Each student will be required to demonstrate independent life-long learning skills by presenting a brief case- based, oral presentation to a faculty member prior to completion of the rotation.

     

    Evaluation:

    Objective

    ♦   A skills completion form will be maintained and checked as the student masters each required skill in the workshops listed above.

    ♦   Subjective - a comprehensive faculty evaluation form will be completed for each student at the conclusion of the selective.

     

     

    Learning Environments:

    •  Emergency Department Clinical Area

    •  Small group workshops

    •  Library

    •  Conferences

    •  One-on-One Faculty Interaction

     

     

     

    All

    Pass/Fail

  
  •  

    EMERG 300 - Emergency Medicine


    Gregory Patek, M.D., Clerkship Director

    2 credit hours

    The primary goal of this third year elective is to expose medical students to the scope, practice, and flow of Emergency Medicine in the setting of a Level 1 Trauma Center. For many students, this will be their first experience in evaluating real patients without a known diagnosis. Over the course of the rotation, the student will begin to develop an understanding of the approach to the undifferentiated patient. This fast-paced exposure will also illustrate the importance of teamwork in the Emergency setting, demonstrating how many moving parts work together to the benefit of the patient. The secondary goal includes providing students with exposure to the fundamental skill set required for patient care in the Emergency Department. In addition to developing an understanding of patient management, the medical student will have the opportunity to participate in many of the skills that are essential to the practice of medicine. These skills will include obtaining vital signs, IV line placement, blood draws, basic wound care, and EKG recording and interpretation. The student will be expected to have direct patient interaction while paired with an Emergency Medicine Resident.

  
  •  

    ERMED 400 - Clinical Toxicology


    .20 credit

    Lectures, audiovisual presentations and panel discussions.  The course deals with clinical and laboratory methods for diagnosis as well as principles of treatment of drug over dosage and ingestion of common poisons. 

    Pass/Fail


Family Medicine

  
  •  

    ELECT EFAME - Primary Care-Community Hospital


    COURSE DIRECTOR(S):Tammy Davis, M.D. PHONE: 318.675.6571
    ELECTIVE DIRECTOR(S): Robert Moore, M.D., Program Director
    DURATION OF ELECTIVE: 4 Weeks CONTACT: Christy Hay
    LOCATION OF ELECTIVE: Rapides Regional Medical Center and Family Practice Medical Center,
    821 Elliott Street, Alexandria, LA
    MAXIMUM NUMBER OF STUDENTS: 2
    ELECTIVE OFFERED DURING BLOCKS: All
    COURSE CODE: EFAME

    1 credit

     

     

    NOTE: THIS ELECTIVE MAY NOT BE DROPPED WITHIN 2 MONTHS OF THE STARTING DATE.

     

    Goal

     

    The student will have the opportunity to observe and participate in all aspects of the practice of primary care medicine in a variety of rural settings. Practices are broad in scope and may include introduction to medical specialties from a primary care perspective; depending on site. AHEC support may be possible.

     

    Objectives:   The student will:

      provide detailed and comprehensive care in a community hospital setting with faculty supervision.

    To specifically:

    *  describe the unique situation and setting of the community hospital and associated practice of family medicine.

    *  work with LSUHSC-S residents and faculty in the community hospital and Family Practice

    Center, seeing all types of patients as a junior colleague.

    *  recognize dermatological problems.

    *  recognize and treat a large variety of medical problems.

    *  recognize and treat a variety of pediatric problems.

    *  list indications for and use of cryotherapy.

    *  list indications for and proficient use of myofascial injections.

    *  participate/perform excisional treatment of common family practice skin problems under observation of the attending.

    *  participate/perform endoscopy under observation of the attending.

     

    Typical activities include initial work-up, management, and treatment of patients; hospital and nursing home rounds, observation and assisting during surgical procedures; and exposure to business aspects of the practice of medicine. All activities are under the direct supervision of the preceptor. Office and call schedules are determined by preceptor. The student physician will have an opportunity to evaluate community hospital medical care to determine the likelihood of a career in this type of medicine.

     

    READING ASSIGNMENTS - As assigned by individual preceptors Refer to SIFMB for additional information.

     

    Visiting Students: Only visiting students from U.S., Canadian, and Caribbean universities will be considered. Students must

     

    present a CA along with documentation of passing scores of 80 or above on initial attempts of Step 1 and Step 2 CK/CS to be

     

    considered. Students must submit all documentation with the application

     

    All

    Pass/Fail

  
  •  

    ELECT EFAMJ - Senior Elective Program - UH Monroe


    COURSE DIRECTOR: Tammy Davis, M.D. PHONE: 318.675.5347
    ELECTIVE DIRECTOR(S): Euil Luther, M.D.
    DURATION OF ELECTIVE: 2 Weeks CONTACT: Christena Hay
    LOCATION OF ELECTIVE: University Health Conway Medical Center, Monroe, LA
    MAXIMUM NUMBER OF STUDENTS: 8 MINIMUM NUMBER OF STUDENTS: 1
    ELECTIVE OFFERED DURING BLOCKS: All Contact Crawford Plummer for Housing
    COURSE CODE: EFAMJ 318.330.7626 / mplumm@lsuhsc.edu

    .5 credit

    Family Medicine Conway Experience

    Conway Medical Center in Monroe is affiliated with LSU Health Sciences Center in Shreveport. Rotations are designed to give students as much clinical responsibility as they are prepared to assume. On- site supervision is available to students at all times from both faculty and residents. Frequent conferences and teaching rounds are held. Specific responsibilities are assigned by the chief of the service at the beginning of each student’s rotation.

    Goal: Familiarity with scope of medicine commonly managed by FM Faculty and House Officers at Conway

    Objectives:

                    The student will: 

    •   provide detailed and comprehensive care in a community hospital setting with faculty supervision.

    • To specifically:

    *  describe the unique situation and setting of the community hospital and associated practice of family medicine.

    *  work with LSUHSC-S residents and faculty in the community hospital and Family Practice

    Center, seeing all types of patients as a junior colleague.

    *  recognize dermatological problems.

    *  recognize and treat a large variety of medical problems.

    *  recognize and treat a variety of pediatric problems.

    *  list indications for and proficient use of myofascial injections.

    *  participate/perform a variety of procedures under supervision of the FM attending.

     

    Family Medicine: This rotation takes place in the Family Medicine Center, our model family practice clinic located adjacent to the hospital. Students work one-on-one with a Family Medicine physician, seeing a wide variety of family Medicine patients. There are no required night or weekend responsibilities.

    Internal Medicine: Students are assigned to a panel of patients on an inpatient team, on which they round daily, write progress notes, and make diagnostic and therapeutic decisions in conjunction with faculty and residents. They take night call with their assigned team, evaluate Medicine consultations in the Emergency Room and perform admission histories and physical examinations. Students round on their patients on half of the weekend days and holidays during their rotation.

    Pediatrics: Students are assigned to either the Pediatric ward or the nursery, and round daily on weekdays on their assigned patients, write progress notes, and make diagnostic and therapeutic decisions in conjunction with the faculty and residents. They see patients in the ambulatory Pediatric clinic every day - morning and afternoon. They take call one night per week, and are responsible for evaluating Pediatric consultations in the Emergency Room and performing admission histories and physical examinations. There are no required weekend duties.

     

    General Surgery: This is a busy general surgery service, including outpatient clinics, operating room, and inpatient service. Night and weekend responsibilities are determined by the chief resident at the beginning of each student’s rotation.

    Radiology: The student rotates with a private radiology group who staff E.A. Conway. Films are reviewed with the radiologists at E.A. Conway. There are no night or weekend responsibilities.

    Anesthesiology:  This is an introductory survey of anesthesia, including structured readings and opportunities for controlled endotracheal intubation. There are no night or weekend responsibilities.

    Housing can be provided for students, and should be requested prior to rotation to ensure adequate accommodations.

    All

    Pass/Fail

  
  •  

    ELECT EFAMK - Senior Elective Program - UH Monroe


    COURSE DIRECTOR(S): Tammy Baudoin, M.D. PHONE: 318.675.5347
    ELECTIVE DIRECTOR(S): Euil Luther, M.D. CONTACT: Christena Hay
    DURATION OF ELECTIVE: 4 Weeks
    LOCATION OF ELECTIVE: University Health Conway Medical Center, Monroe, LA
    MAXIMUM NUMBER OF STUDENTS: 8 MINIMUM NUMBER OF STUDENTS: 1
    ELECTIVE OFFERED DURING BLOCKS: All Contact Crawford Plummer for Housing
    COURSE CODE: EFAMK 318.330.7626 / mplumm@lsuhsc.edu

    1 credit

     

    Family Medicine Conway Experience

     

    Conway Medical Center in Monroe is affiliated with LSU Health Sciences Center in Shreveport. Rotations are designed to give students as much clinical responsibility as they are prepared to assume. On- site supervision is available to students at all times from both faculty and residents. Frequent conferences and teaching rounds are held. Specific responsibilities are assigned by the chief of the service at the beginning of each student’s rotation.

    Goal: Familiarity with scope of medicine commonly managed by FM Faculty and House Officers at Conway

    Objectives:

                    The student will: 

    •   provide detailed and comprehensive care in a community hospital setting with faculty supervision.

    • To specifically:

    *  describe the unique situation and setting of the community hospital and associated practice of family medicine.

    *  work with LSUHSC-S residents and faculty in the community hospital and Family Practice

    Center, seeing all types of patients as a junior colleague.

    *  recognize dermatological problems.

    *  recognize and treat a large variety of medical problems.

    *  recognize and treat a variety of pediatric problems.

    *  list indications for and proficient use of myofascial injections.

    *  participate/perform a variety of procedures under supervision of the FM attending.

     

    Family Medicine: This rotation takes place in the Family Medicine Center, our model family practice clinic located adjacent to the hospital. Students work one-on-one with a Family Medicine physician, seeing a wide variety of family Medicine patients. There are no required night or weekend responsibilities.

    Internal Medicine: Students are assigned to a panel of patients on an inpatient team, on which they round daily, write progress notes, and make diagnostic and therapeutic decisions in conjunction with faculty and residents. They take night call with their assigned team, evaluate Medicine consultations in the Emergency Room and perform admission histories and physical examinations. Students round on their patients on half of the weekend days and holidays during their rotation.

    Pediatrics: Students are assigned to either the Pediatric ward or the nursery, and round daily on weekdays on their assigned patients, write progress notes, and make diagnostic and therapeutic decisions in conjunction with the faculty and residents. They see patients in the ambulatory Pediatric clinic every day - morning and afternoon. They take call one night per week, and are responsible for evaluating Pediatric consultations in the Emergency Room and performing admission histories and physical examinations. There are no required weekend duties.

     

    General Surgery: This is a busy general surgery service, including outpatient clinics, operating room, and inpatient service. Night and weekend responsibilities are determined by the chief resident at the beginning of each student’s rotation.

    Radiology: The student rotates with a private radiology group who staff E.A. Conway. Films are reviewed with the radiologists at E.A. Conway. There are no night or weekend responsibilities.

    Anesthesiology:  This is an introductory survey of anesthesia, including structured readings and opportunities for controlled endotracheal intubation. There are no night or weekend responsibilities.

     

    Housing can be provided for students, and should be requested prior to rotation to ensure adequate accommodations.

    All

    Pass/Fail

  
  •  

    ELECT EFAMT - Study in Addiction Medicine


    COURSE DIRECTOR(S): Tammy Davis, M.D. PHONE: 318.675.5347
    ELECTIVE DIRECTOR(S): David Boyle, Ph.D.
    DURATION OF ELECTIVE: 4 Weeks CONTACT: Christena Hay
    LOCATION OF ELECTIVE: University Health - EA Conway Monroe
    MAXIMUM NUMBER OF STUDENTS: 2 Contact Crawford Plummer for Housing ELECTIVE OFFERED DURING BLOCKS: All 318.330.7626 / mplumm@lsuhsc.edu
    COURSE CODE: EFAMT

    1 credit

    GOAL:

    Students will develop an understanding of the diagnosis and treatment of chemically dependent patients.

     

    OBJECTIVES

     

    •  Students will identify methods of detoxification and general medical care associated with acute and chronic chemically dependent patients.

    •  Students will identify current methods of treating chemical dependency, including both in-patient and out-patient modalities.

    •  Students will identify the pharmacological basis and physiologic consequences of chemical  dependence.

    •  Students will identify the basic principles used in counseling the families of chemically dependent patients.

     

     

    SPECIFIC DUTIES OF SENIOR STUDENTS

     

     

    Students will be an active member of the Addiction Team in the hospital and in the Family Practice Center. They will perform detailed substance abuse histories (including acute and chronic physiological consequences of addiction) and discharge planning (including referral procedures for out-patient treatment). Students will also rotate at a local addiction treatment facility where they will participate in treatment planning and participate in daily individual and group therapies with the patients and staff. Supervision will be provided by LSUHSC faculty.

     

    There will be no call duty.

     

     

     

    READING ASSIGNMENTS

     

    As appropriate to the subject matter.

     

     

     

     

     

     

    Housing is provided for students.

     

    HOURS PER WEEK

    CONF                      HRS      WARD                   HRS        LAB                          HRS      LIBRARY                      HRS

    PRECEPTOR                  HRS    CLINIC                    HRS        LECTURE                  HRS     READING                      HRS

    TOTAL NUMBER OF HOURS PER WEEK:       35-40         

    All

    Pass/Fail

  
  •  

    ELECT EGLOB - Global Health Elective


    Director Fourth Year Department Courses: Tammy Davis, MD
    Elective Director: Michael B. Harper, MD, MBA; Professor and Chairman of Family Medicine;
    Administrative Contact: Christy Hay, 675-5347,
    Location: Kenya
    Number of Students per 4 week block: 8
    Elective available during block for 2018: Block 8 and 10
    Non-LSUHSC Students allowed: No
    Course Code: EGLOB

    1 credit

    Primary Goals of Elective: To provide medical training in global health for students at LSU Health Shreveport.  To sharpen participants’ interviewing and physical exam skills, and their understanding of cost-constrained care, while nurturing cultural sensitivity and demonstrating the importance of public health.  To foster health career development for LSU Health students interested in global health and the care of underserved populations in the US. To encourage ongoing collaboration between students and a wide array of health professionals working to improve global health through education, research, and service.

    Specific Objectives:

    • Students will enhance their medical history and physical examination skills as the provider of first contact for 10-20 patients a day under the supervision of LSU Health faculty.Minimum contact hours per week: 30.
    • Students will gain skills in the use of a medical translator for gathering historical information and for communicating with patients who speak a different language.
    • Students will enhance their clinical decision making skills by learning to effectively manage patients with minimal reliance on expensive technology and pharmaceuticals commonly used in the teaching hospital.
    • Students will develop greater cultural sensitivity, and an appreciation of diverse customs and life experiences.
    • Students will observe and discuss the interrelationship between health and infrastructure, culture, politics, and economic stability in Sub-Saharan Africa.
    • Students will be able to outline common hazards to international travel, and will strictly follow established safety guidelines.
    • Students will gain knowledge and skills in the identification and management of common tropical diseases.
    • Students will demonstrate their ability to find, organize, and effectively present medical information on a selected topic to their colleagues.

    Resources for Learning:

    • Participating faculty
    • Hands-on experience
    • Computer Assisted Instruction: Medical Informatics
    • Directed readings

    Special features of this selective:

    This elective is a four week block in western Kenya. Students will see patients in mobile clinics approximately 30-40 hours per week under the direct supervision of LSU Health faculty members. A Kenya health care team will also be present at each clinic to offer assistance. Each student will see 10-20 patients per day. They will take histories with assistance of translators, perform physical exams, make a clinical diagnosis and develop a treatment plan for each patient. The method of instruction will be the same preceptor model used in the Comprehensive Care Clinic on the LSU Health campus. A hand written clinic note will be generated for each patient and the data from the clinics will be compiled on an Excel spread sheet to document the experience.

    Detailed policies regarding allowed activities, travel restrictions, and other safety measures as approved by the office of risk management will be completed by each student.

    Evaluation:

    Faculty will give formative verbal feedback to students daily and complete written summative evaluations at midpoint of the elective and upon completion of the elective. 

    Each student will be required to prepare and give a presentation to the group during the elective on a tropical medicine topic. Students will choose from a list of topics selected by the faculty prior to the elective. Particular emphasis will be placed on malaria, typhoid fever, and other common diseases seen in Western Kenya. 

    Students will be required to prepare a reflective essay that describes their experience and addresses one or more topics from a list of options.  

    The final grade will be pass/fail

    Block 8 and 10

    Pass/Fail

  
  •  

    ELECT EOFMB - Outpatient Clinics and Procedures- Family Practice Center


    DIRECTOR FOURTH YEAR DEPARTMENT COURSES: Tammy Davis, M.D.
    Selective Director: Luke Baudoin, M.D.
    ADMINISTRATIVE CONTACT: Christena Hay Phone - 675.5347; Rm. 1-305
    LOCATION: University Health - Shreveport
    NUMBER OF STUDENTS PER 4 WEEK BLOCK: 2
    ELECTIVE AVAILABLE DURING BLOCKS: Blocks 2-11 USMLE Step II Recommended
    COURSE CODE: EOFMB *Second slot availability limited due to scheduling
    NOTE: This elective may not be dropped within 2 months of the starting date.

    1 credit

     

     

     

    Primary Goals:

     

    To provide students experience in the application of essential family medicine skills, attitudes, and knowledge in family practice clinic and clinic procedural settings.

     

    Specific Objectives:

     

     Students will develop their skills in obtaining problem pertinent medical history and physical exam findings relative to the common disorders encountered in family practice.

     Students will be able to compare family medicine problem-solving in a variety of ambulatory settings, especially as it relates to the evaluation and management of common medical disorders.

     Students will be able to discuss documentation requirements in a variety of ambulatory settings.

     Students will be able to discuss how the following relate to successful clinical practice: The doctor-patient rela- tionship, continuity of care, the health care team, appropriate consultations, and preventive care.

     Students will be able to compare the effects of social and cultural variables on the health of patients in a variety of clinical settings.

     Students will extend their knowledge of fundamental principles of medicine and specific disease entities through conferences, reading and other self-study learning modalities; and will be able to discuss practical applications of that information.

     Students will extend their skills base and knowledge of common primary care procedures, and their application to family practice.

     

    Resources for Learning:

     

     Participating Faculty: Course director, LSUHSC family physicians.

     Texts: As recommended by assigned preceptor.

     Workshops:  Periodic small group discussions and didactic conferences with Family Practice residents.

     Hands-on Experience: Supervised evaluation and management of clinic patients in an outpatient setting.

     Computer Assisted Instruction: Library research.

     Directed Readings: As recommended by assigned preceptor.

     Self-Directed Learning: Focused review of topics directly related to patient care, utilizing library and online resources.

     

    Evaluation:

     

    Students will receive a passing grade if they complete all required activities as presented above, and demonstrate the professional attributes essential to the practice of medicine. These professional attributes include: Appropriate grooming, punctuality, attendance at all required activities unless appropriately excused, a respectful and caring approach to patients, adherence to stated and applied rules of conduct, and appropriate interactions with all faculty and staff. This list is not all-inclusive. The course director will complete evaluation forms with input from ward attending and residents. The course director will determine the final grade. Students at risk of failing will be handled on a case-by-case basis; they will be notified personally and/or in writing of any concerns in a timely fashion, and will be offered a reasonable opportunity to improve their performance.

     

     

     

    The course director will ensure achievement of all objectives by all students, primarily by their participation in regular small group discussions. The course director may develop and require students to complete self-study and evaluation forms when necessary to document achievement of course objectives.

     

    Blocks 2-11

    Pass/Fail

  
  •  

    FMMD 300 - Family Medicine


    Charles Baxter, M.D., Clerkship Director

    6.00 credit hours

    Under the supervision of licensed Family Medicine Faculty, MSIII year students participate in 6 weeks of both community and university practices divided into three 2 week blocks spread throughout the year. In the university practice (Comprehensive Care Clinic and Primary Care Family Medicine Clinic) the student assumes the role of primary physician, with continuing responsibility in the care of patients and families throughout the MSIII year. In the community, students will rotate with the same community Primary Care physician throughout the six week clerkship. The didactic content will primarily come from nationally recognized web based clinical cases.

  
  •  

    SELECT SIFMA - Inpatient Acting Internship-Family Medicine


    DIRECTOR FOURTH YEAR DEPARTMENT COURSES: Tammy Davis M.D.
    SELECTIVE CATEGORY: Inpatient Acting Internship
    SELECTIVE DIRECTOR: Luke Baudoin, M.D.
    ADMINISTRATIVE CONTACT: Christy Hay Phone - 675.5347; Rm. 1-305
    LOCATION: University Health - Shreveport
    NUMBER OF STUDENTS PER 4 WEEK BLOCK: 1*
    SELECTIVE AVAILABLE DURING BLOCKS: Blocks 2-11
    COURSE CODE: SIFMA
    NOTE: This elective may not be dropped within 2 months of the starting date
    *Elective/Selective Total = 2 USMLE Step II Recommended

    1 credit

     

     

    Primary Goals of Selective:

     

    To provide students experience in the application of essential family medicine skills, attitudes, and knowledge in an inpatient setting.

     

    Specific Objectives:

     

     Students will develop their skills in obtaining medical history and physical exam findings relative to the common and major disorders encountered in the Family Medicine inpatient service.

    Students will improve their skills in the evaluation and management of common and major inpatient disorders.

     Students will be able to discuss documentation requirements in the hospital, and compare them to requirements in the student clinic.

     Students will be able to discuss the effects of social and cultural variables on the health of patients in the hospital setting.

     Students will extend their knowledge of fundamental principles of medicine and specific disease entities through conferences, readings, and other self-study learning modalities; and will be able to discuss practical applications of that information.

     

    Resources for Learning:

     

     Participating Faculty: Course director, LSUHSC family physicians.

       Texts: As recommended by assigned preceptor.

     Workshops:  Periodic small group discussions and didactic conferences with Family Practice residents.

     Hands-on Experience: Supervised evaluation and management of patients in an inpatient setting.

     Computer Assisted Instruction: Library research.

     Directed Readings: As recommended by assigned preceptor.

    • Self-Directed Learning: Focused review of topics directly related to patient care, utilizing library and online resources.

     

    Evaluation:

     

    Students will receive a passing grade if they complete all required activities as presented above, and demonstrate the professional attributes essential to the practice of medicine. These professional attributes include: Appropriate grooming, punctuality, attendance at all required activities unless appropriately excused, a respectful and caring approach to patients, adherence to stated and applied rules of conduct, and appropriate interactions with all faculty and staff.  This list is not all-inclusive.  The course director will complete evaluation forms with input from ward attending and residents. The course director will determine the final grade. Students at risk of failing will be handled on a case-by-case basis; they will be notified personally and/or in writing of any concerns in a timely fashion, and will be offered a reasonable opportunity to improve their performance.

     

    The course director will ensure achievement of all objectives by all students, primarily through participation in regular small group discussions. The course director may develop and require students to complete self-study and evaluation forms when necessary to document achievement of course objectives.

     

    USMLEStepIIencouraged.

    Blocks 2-11

    Pass/Fail

  
  •  

    SELECT SIFMB - Inpatient Acting Internship–Alexandria


    SELECTIVE CATEGORY: Inpatient Acting Internship
    SELECTIVE DIRECTORS: Robert Moore M.D., Program Director
    ADMINISTRATIVE CONTACT: Christena Hay, 318.675.5347 room 1-305
    LOCATION: Family Medicine Medical Center, 821 Elliott Street, Alexandria, LA
    and Rapides Regional Medical Center
    NUMBER OF STUDENTS PER 4 WEEK BLOCK: 1
    SELECTIVE AVAILABLE DURING BLOCKS: 2-11
    COURSE CODE: SIFMB

    1 credit

    Primary Goals of Selective:

     

    To provide student’s experience in the application of essential Family Medicine skills, attitudes, and knowledge in a large Community Hospital inpatient setting.

     

     

    Specific Objectives:

     

    The students will be able to:

    •  Develop skills in obtaining medical history and physical exam findings relative to the common and major disorders encountered on the Family Medicine adult and pediatric inpatient services.

    •  Improve their skills in the diagnosis, evaluation and management of common inpatient disorders, and healthy newborns.

        •  Document appropriately in the hospital record, including progress notes, orders, and charges.

    •  Recognize the effects of social and cultural variables on the health and management of patients in the hospital setting.

    • Increase their knowledge of fundamental principles of medicine, specific disease entities, and normal variants through conferences, reading, and other self-study modalities, and be able to discuss the practical application of that information.

    •  Discuss the specialty of Family Medicine and the management of patients within the context of continuity of care by primary care physicians.

     

     

     

     

    Resources for Learning:

     

       •  Participating faculty: LSUHSC -  Alexandria Family Practice Residency faculty.

     

       •  Texts: As recommended by assigned preceptor

     

    • Workshops: Periodic small group discussions and didactic conferences with Family Practice residents.

     

    •  Hands-on Experience: Supervised evaluation and management of assigned patients in the inpatient setting.

     

       •  Computer Assisted Instruction: Library Research

     

       •  Directed Readings: As recommended by assigned preceptor

     

       •  Self-directed Learning: Focused review of topics directly related to patient care.

     

     

    Evaluation

     

    Students will receive a passing grade if they complete all required activities as presented above, and demonstrate the professional attributes essential to the practice of medicine.  These professional attributes include; appropriate grooming, punctuality, attendance at all required activities unless appropriately excused, a respectful and caring approach to patients, adherence to stated and applied rules of conduct, and appropriate interactions with all faculty and staff. This list is not all-inclusive. The ward attending(s) will complete evaluation forms with input from the residents and other staff as appropriate. The ward attending and the course director will determine the final grade.   Students at risk of failing will be handled on a case-by-case basis, they will be notified personally and/or in writing of any concerns in a timely manner, and will be offered a reasonable opportunity to improve their performance.

     

     

         1)  List any specific core physical exam skills to be taught in your course.

     

    •  The core examination skills learned in the junior year including examination of the head, neck, heart, lungs, abdomen and extremities will be reinforced, in both adult and pediatric patients.

     

     2)  List any specific skills as well as attitudes and behaviors that you will be evaluating during your course and how these will be done in a structured manner (LCME).

     

    •  Skills and behaviors will be evaluated by the preceptor in an ongoing fashion after direct observation and interaction with the student.  The written evaluation form will be completed by the preceptor(s) working with the student.  The preceptor will also solicit input from the upper level residents working with the student.  Specific attention will be given to attendance, maturity, fund of knowledge, self-education, oral and written presentations, clinical skills, interpersonal skills in relating to patients and staff, and improvement noted during the course.

     

         3)  Copy of  evaluation form to be used in your course for the grade determination.

     

     

         4)   Grading process, number and timing of evaluations.

     

    •  Preceptor(s) evaluation will occur in an ongoing fashion, the preceptor will provide feedback as appropriate during the rotation.  An evaluation will be submitted formally by means of the evaluation form at the end of the rotation.

     

    5)   Identify handouts, text, and other major resources to be purchased by students or provided by the department if different from previously provided.

     

    •    Standard texts and journal access is provided in the library at the Residency and also at Rapides

    Regional Medical Center.

     

         6)   Describe any computer usage anticipated for the course.

     

    Computer time will be used to research specific medical problems identified by the preceptor during the course of practice.  The preceptor and course director will assist the student in this endeavor and provide topics for research when none are identified in the course of practice

     

         7)   Describe any anticipated teaching of or use of problem solving skills to be part of your course.

     

    Clinical problem solving will be taught in the ongoing care of patients. Review of problems, critical thinking, differential diagnosis, and literature utilization will be explored as they relate to patient care.

     

     

          8)   List which medical school objectives will be covered at least in part within your course objectives (LCME).

     

    • Demonstrate a working knowledge of the normal structure and function of the human body and its major organ systems; the structural and homeostatic dysfunctions that cause disorders; the impact of human development, growth, and aging on normal and disordered structure, function and behavior; and the pathophysiologic basis of human diseases.

     

     

    • Demonstrate the ability to evaluate patients, organize and present patient information and properly manage patients by: being able to conduct a medical history and physical examination (comprehensive and focused); developing judgment concerning when a comprehensive or focused evaluation is appropriate; reliably eliciting appropriate information in a history and detecting abnormal finding on the physical examination; correctly identifying the patient=s medical problems, including psycho- social and behavioral problems; formulating accurate hypotheses as to the causes and solutions of these problems; developing appropriate strategies for exploring these hypotheses, including the use of laboratory tests and imaging studies; properly and safely performing routine technical procedures; and formulating a management plan.

     

    • Diagnose and manage patients with common acute and chronic medical conditions; recognize and institute initial treatment for patients with serious or life-threatening conditions.

     

     

    • Critically read, analyze and interpret the biomedical literature to stay informed and current with developments in medicine.

     

     

    • Access and evaluate epidemiological data relating to risk indicators for disease in order to practice effective preventive medicine and to foster healthy behavior.

     

     

    • Develop skills in the use of computers and related technologies to: study and access current clinical information; retrieve, analyze, document and relay information about patients; communicate optimally with peers and faculty; and collect, analyze, interpret and report information regarding clinical cases and biomedical research.

     

     

    • Treat patients using accepted moral and ethical guidelines; exhibit integrity and compassion, understand the importance to patients of privacy and dignity; and give careful attention to the impact of human diversity, the needs of the medically underserved and the needs of dying patients when no cure is possible.

     

     

    • Recognize the unique nature of the doctor-patient relationship; demonstrate respect for the roles of other health care professional; communicate effectively orally and in writing with patients, patients’ families, colleagues and other medical personnel.

    Blocks 2-11

    Pass/Fail

  
  •  

    SELECT SIMDF - Inpatient Rotation


    DIRECTOR FOURTH YEAR DEPARTMENT COURSES: Tammy Davis, M.D.
    SELECTIVE CATEGORY: Inpatient Acting Internship
    SELECTIVE DIRECTORS: Euil Luther, M.D.
    ADMINISTRATIVE CONTACT: Christena Hay, 675-5347, 1-305
    LOCATION: University Health Hospital- Monroe, LA
    NUMBER OF STUDENTS PER 4 WEEK BLOCK: 1

    SELECTIVE AVAILABLE DURING BLOCKS: All
    COURSE CODE: SIMDF

    Contact Crawford Plummer for Housing
    (318) 330-7626 / mplumm@lsuhsc.edu

    1 credit

    Primary Goals of Selective:

    To provide student’s experience in the application of essential Family Medicine skills, attitudes, and knowledge in an inpatient clinic setting.

     

    Specific Objectives:

     

    •  Students will develop their skills in obtaining problem pertinent medical history and physical exam findings relative to the common disorders encountered in Internal Medicine.

    •  Students will develop their skills as clinicians in an Internal Medicine Inpatient setting as they develop an assessment and plan on their patients.

    •  Students will be able to discuss documentation requirements with the Family Medicine faculty to learn the appropriate recording of medical information.

    •  Students will be able to discuss how the following relate to the successful clinical practice: the doctor-patient relationship, continuity of care, the health care team, appropriate consultations, and preventative care.

       •  Students will be able to compare the effects of social and cultural variables on the health of patients in the

    Internal Medicine Inpatient setting.

    •  Students will extend their knowledge of fundamental principles of fundamental principles of medicine and specific disease entities through conferences, reading and other self-study learning modalities; and be able to discuss practical applications of that information.

    •  Students will gain exposure in and experience with common inpatient procedures performed in an acute care hospital ward setting.

     

    Resources for Learning:

    •  Participating Faculty: Course director, LSUHSC Family Medicine Faculty.

    •  Texts: As recommended by assigned preceptor.

    •  Hands-on Experience: Supervised evaluation and management of ward patients in an inpatient setting.

    •  Computer Assisted Instruction: Library research

    •  Directed Readings: As recommended by assigned preceptor.

    •  Self-Directed Learning: Focused review of topics directly related to patient care utilizing library and online resources.

     

    Evaluation

     

    •  Students will receive a passing grade if they complete all required activities as presented above, and demonstrate the professional attributes essential to the practice of medicine.  These professional attributes include; appropriate grooming, punctuality, attendance at all required activities unless appropriately excused, a respectful and caring approach to patients, adherence to stated and applied rules of conduct, and appropriate interactions with all faculty and staff. This list is not all-inclusive. The course director will complete evaluation forms with input from faculty preceptors and residents.  The course director will determine the final grade. Students at risk of failing will be handled on a case-by-case basis, they will be notified personally and/or in writing of any concerns in a timely fashion, and will be offered a reasonable opportunity to improve their performance.

     

    •  The course director will ensure achievement of all objectives by all students primarily by their participation in regular small group discussions. The course director may develop and require students to complete self-study and evaluation forms when necessary to document achievement of course objectives.

     

       1. List any specific core physical exam skills to be taught in your course

    •  Specific skills taught will vary as patients permit. Core examination skills learned in the junior year including examination of the head, neck, heart, lungs, abdomen and extremities will be reinforced.

     

     

    2. List any specific clinical skills as well as attitudes and behaviors that you will be evaluating during your course and how these will be done in a structured manner (LCME)

    •  Skills and behaviors will be evaluated by review of the evaluation form completed by the assigned preceptors and by direct communication between the course director and the assigned preceptors.  Specific attention will be given to

    attendance, maturity, fund of knowledge, self-education, oral and written presentations, clinical skills and improvement noted during the course.

     

     

      3. Copy of evaluation form to be used in your course for the grade determination

     

     

      4. Grading process, number and timing of evaluations

    •  Preceptor evaluation will occur in an ongoing fashion and results will be submitted verbally as necessary throughout the rotation and formally submitted by evaluation form at the completion of the rotation.

     

     

    5. Identify handouts, text and other major resources to be purchased by students or provided by the department if different from previously provided

    •  Standard medical texts and library resources will be utilized.

     

     

      6. Describe any computer usage anticipated for the course

    •  Computer time will be used to research specific relevant medical problems identified by the assigned preceptor during the course of practice.  Library and Internet resources will be available.  The course director will assist the student in this endeavor and provide topics for research when none are identified in the course of practice. Inpatient lab computer use will also be encouraged.

     

     

      7. Describe any anticipated teaching of or use of problem solving skills to be part of your course. (LCME)

    •  Clinical problem solving will be taught in the acute and ongoing care of patients.  Review of problems, critical thinking, differential diagnosis, and literature utilization as these things relate to patient care will be explored.

     

     8. List which medical school objectives will be covered at least in part within your course objectives (LCME)

    •  Demonstrate a working knowledge of the normal structure and function of the human body and its major organ systems; the structural and homeostatic dysfunction’s that cause disorders; the impact of human development, growth, and aging on normal and disordered structure, function, and behavior; and the pathophysiologic basis of human diseases.

    •  Demonstrate the ability to evaluate patients, organize and present patient information, and properly manage medical problems by: being able to conduct a medical history and physical examination (comprehensive and focused); developing judgment concerning when a comprehensive or focused evaluation is appropriate; reliably eliciting appropriate information in a history and detecting abnormal findings on the physical examination; correctly identifying the patient’s medical problems, including psychosocial and behavioral problems; formulating accurate hypotheses as to the causes and solutions of these problems; developing appropriate strategies for exploring these hypotheses, including the use of laboratory tests and imaging studies; properly and safely performing routine technical procedures; and formulating a management plan.

    •  Diagnose and manage patients with common acute and chronic conditions; recognize and institute initial treatment for patients with serious or life-threatening conditions.

    •  Critically read, analyze, and interpret the biomedical literature to stay informed and current with developments in medicine.

    •  Access and evaluate epidemiological data relating to risk indicators for disease in order to practice effective preventive medicine and to foster healthy behavior.

    •  Develop skills in the use of computers and related technologies to: study and access current clinical information; retrieve, analyze, document and relay information about patients; communicate optimally with peers and faculty; and collect, analyze, interpret and report information regarding clinical cases and biomedical research.

    •  Treat patients using accepted moral and ethical guidelines; exhibit integrity and compassion, understand the importance to patients of privacy and dignity; and give careful attention to the impacts of human diversity, the needs of the medically underserved, and the needs of dying patients when no cure is possible.

    •  Recognize the unique nature of the doctor-patient relationship: demonstrate respect for the roles of other health care professionals; communicate effectively orally and in writing with patients, patients’ families, colleagues, and other medical personnel.

     

    All

    Pass/Fail

  
  •  

    SELECT SOFMA - Ambulatory (Outpatient Selective)


    DIRECTOR FOURTH YEAR DEPARTMENT COURSES: Tammy Davis, M.D.
    SELECTIVE CATEGORY: Ambulatory Selective
    SELECTIVE DIRECTOR: Chuck Baxter, MD
    ADMINISTRATIVE CONTACT: Christena Hay, 675-5347, Room 1-305C
    LOCATION: LSUHSC-Shreveport Family Medicine PCF/CCC Clinics:
    NUMBER OF STUDENTS PER BLOCK: 1 for SOFMA; 1 for SOFME
    No Electives Offered in the Comprehensive Care Clinic
    SELECTIVE AVAILABLE DURING BLOCKS: All
    NON-LSUHSC STUDENTS ALLOWED: No
    COURSE CODE: SOFMA - 2 week code; SOFME (4 week code)

    .5 credit

     

     

    Primary Goals of Selective:

    Students will attain additional experience in caring for patients in a primary care setting, improve knowledge and skills related to preventive care and medical disorders commonly seen in a primary care setting, and demonstrate adherence to professional standards.    

     

    Specific Objectives:

     

    Students will provide primary contact with patients as part of a multidisciplinary team, under faculty supervision, and will keep a complete patient log of all patients on MyEvaluations.

    Students will perform and document a history and physical, and will formulate a provisional treatment plan for each assigned patient for review with the attending physician.

    Students will attain proficiency with using evidence based medicine or point of care resources.

    Students will adhere to professional standards as outlined in the Course Syllabus. 

     

    Resources for Learning:

    This is an experiential activity. Student interactions with patients and the health care team in the clinics are the primary learning resource. Quality education is dependent on the quality of patient care provided.  Students will actively participate in the ongoing evaluation and improvement of patient care through discussions with patients, their families, and other members of the health care team; the use of informational resources; and participation in ongoing quality improvement projects.

     

    Continuity of care between patients and primary care providers is a basic principal of Family Medicine. Senior students will continue with the same health care teams assigned to them as junior students. This arrangement improves the overall continuity for our patients, and allows individual students the option to maintain continuity relationships with patients from the junior FMMD rotation.  For ideal continuity, PCF/CCC blocks should be separated by 2-4 months.

         

    Students may be given assigned readings and required to complete mandatory simulation / e-cases on common clinical problems. Students are expected to actively participate in departmental-based educational activities (Grand Rounds) and demonstrate self-directed learning.

    Students will document the daily use of point of care resources to answer clinical questions raised by their patient encounters. The quality of clinical questions generated by the student, the level of information they find, and their ability to apply this information appropriately to patient care should improve as they progress through the rotation.  The students will choose two of these questions to submit for final approval before passing the course. 

     

     

    Evaluation:

     

    Passing the selective will require demonstrated attendance to all assigned activities, completion of all required activities, adherence to professional standards of behavior, and a passing score on all evaluations.  

     

    Students, who expect to interview with multiple programs, are strongly encouraged not to choose this selective during the interview season. The maximum allowed excused absence from the rotation is two days.  Excused absences will require appropriate documentation and notice.

     

    Blocks 3-11

    Pass/Fail

  
  •  

    SELECT SOFMC - Outpatient Senior Selective


    SELECTIVE CATEGORY: Outpatient
    SELECTIVE DIRECTORS: Robert Moore M.D., Program Director
    ADMINISTRATIVE CONTACT: Christena Hay, 318.675.5347 Room 1-305
    LOCATION: Family Medicine Medical Center; Elliott Street; Alexandria, LA
    NUMBER OF STUDENTS PER BLOCK: 1
    SELECTIVE AVAILABLE DURING BLOCKS: 2-11
    COURSE CODE: SOFMC - code for 2 weeks; SOFMF - code for 4 weeks

    .5 credit

    Primary Goals of Selective:

     

    To provide student’s experience in the application of essential Family Medicine skills, attitudes, and knowledge in community outpatient setting.

     

     

     

    Specific Objectives:

     

    The students will be able to:

    • Develop skills in obtaining medical history and physical exam findings relative to the common disorders encountered in Family Medicine.

    •  Improve their skills in the diagnosis, evaluation and management of common outpatient disorders, and preventive health care.

    • Document appropriately, and compare documentation requirements to those at the Shreveport campus.

    •  Recognize the effects of social and cultural variables on the health and management of patients in the outpatient setting, and compare these effects with those on campus.

    •  Describe how the following relate to a successful clinical practice: time management, the doctor patient relationship, office management and medical economics, medico-legal issues and risk reduction, the health care team and community resources, appropriate referral practices and continued medical education.

    •  Increase their knowledge of fundamental principles of medicine, specific disease entities, and normal variants through conferences, reading, and other self-study modalities, and be able to discuss the practical application of that information.

    •  Discuss the specialty of Family Medicine, and the management of patients within the context of continuity of care by primary care physicians.

     

     

    Resources for Learning

     

    •  Participating faculty: LSUHSC -  Alexandria Family Practice Residency faculty.

    •  Texts: As recommended by assigned preceptor

    •  Workshops: Periodic small group discussions, and didactic conferences with Family Practice residents.

    •  Hands -on Experience: Supervised evaluation of patients in the community setting.

    •  Computer Assisted Instruction: Library Research

    •  Directed Readings: As recommended by assigned preceptor

    •  Self-directed Learning: Focused review of topics directly related to patient care.

     

     

     

    Please refer to SIFMB for additional learning and evaluation information.

     

     

     

     

    Evaluation

     

    •  Students will receive a passing grade if they complete all required activities as presented above, and demonstrate the professional attributes essential to the practice of medicine.  These professional attributes include; appropriate grooming, punctuality, attendance at all required activities unless appropriately excused, a respectful and caring approach to patients, adherence to stated and applied rules of conduct, and appropriate interactions with all faculty and staff. The residency faculty preceptors will complete evaluation forms. The course director will determine the final grade.  Students at risk of failing will be handled on a case-by-case basis.  They will be notified personally and/or in writing of any concerns in a timely fashion, and will be offered a reasonable opportunity to improve their performance.

     

    •  The course director may develop and require students to complete self-study and evaluation forms when necessary to document achievement of course objectives.

     

     

     

          1)   List any specific core physical exam skills to be taught in your course.

     

    The core examination skills learned in the junior year including examination of the head, neck, heart, lungs, abdomen and extremities will be reinforced, in both adult and pediatric patients.

     

     2)   List any specific clinical skills as well as attitudes and behaviors that you will be evaluating during your course and how these will be done in a structured manner (LCME).

     

    Skills and behaviors will be evaluated by the preceptor in an ongoing fashion after direct observation and interaction with the student in daily clinic.  The written evaluation form will be completed by the preceptor(s) working with the student. Specific attention will be given to attendance, maturity, fund of knowledge, self-education, oral and written presentations, clinical skills, interpersonal skills in relating to patients and staff, and improvement noted during the course.

     

         3)   Copy of evaluation form to be used in your course for the grade determination.

     

     

         4)   Grading process, number and timing of evaluations.

     

    Preceptor(s) evaluation will occur in an ongoing fashion and results will be submitted formally by means of the evaluation form at the end of the rotation.

     

    5)   Identify handouts, text and other major resources to be purchased by students or provided by the department if different from previously provided.

     

    Not applicable

     

         6)   Describe any Computer usage anticipated for the course.

     

    Computer time will be used to research specific medical problems identified by the preceptor during the course of practice.  The preceptor and course director will assist the student in this endeavor and provide topics for research when none are identified in the course of practice.

     

         7)   Describe any anticipated teaching of or use of problem solving skills to be part of your course

     

    The student will be introduced to community based clinical problem solving skills while observing the preceptor.  The student will also be assigned patients to evaluate by history taking and examination, and will formulate an impression and plan which will be presented to and discussed with the preceptor prior to his or her evaluation of the same patient.

     

     

     

     

         8)   List which medical school objectives will be covered at least in part within your course objectives (LCME)

     

    •  Demonstrate a working knowledge of the normal structure and function of the human body and its major organ systems; the structural and homeostatic dysfunctions that cause disorders; the impact of human development, growth, and aging on normal and disordered structure, function and behavior; and the pathophysiologic basis of human diseases.

     

    •  Demonstrate the ability to evaluate patients, organize and present patient information, and properly manage patients by: being able to conduct a medical history and physical examination (comprehensive and focused); developing judgment concerning when a comprehensive or focused evaluation is appropriate; reliably eliciting appropriate information in a history and detecting abnormal findings on the physical examination; correctly identifying the patients’ medical problems, including psychosocial and behavioral problems; formulating accurate hypotheses as to the causes and solutions of these problems; developing appropriate strategies for exploring these hypotheses, including the use of laboratory tests and imaging studies; properly and safely performing routine technical procedures; and formulating a management plan.

     

    •  Diagnose and manage patients with common acute and chronic medical conditions; recognize and institute initial treatment for patients with serious or life-threatening conditions.

     

    •  Critically read, analyze, and interpret the biomedical literature to stay informed and current with developments in medicine.

     

    •  Access and evaluate epidemiological data relating to risk indicators for disease in order to practice effective preventive medicine and to foster healthy behavior.

     

    •  Develop skills in the use of computers and related technologies to: study and access current clinical information; retrieve, analyze, document and relay information about patients; communicate optimally with peers and faculty; and collect, analyze, interpret and report information regarding clinical cases and biomedical research.

     

    • Treat patients using accepted moral and ethical guidelines; exhibit integrity and compassion, understand the importance to patients of privacy and dignity; and give careful attention to the impacts of human diversity, the needs of the medically underserved, and the needs of dying patients when no cure is possible.

     

    •  Recognize the unique nature of the doctor-patient relationship: demonstrate respect for the roles of other health care professionals; communicate effectively orally and in writing with patients, patients’ families, colleagues, and other medical personnel.

    Blocks 2-11

    Pass/Fail

  
  •  

    SELECT SOMDF - Outpatient Rotation


    DIRECTOR FOURTH YEAR DEPARTMENT COURSES: Tammy Davis, M.D.
    SELECTIVE CATEGORY: Outpatient Clinic
    SELECTIVE DIRECTORS: Euil Luther, M.D.
    ADMINISTRATIVE CONTACT: Christena Hay, 675.5347, 1-305
    LOCATION: University Health Hospital- Monroe, LA
    NUMBER OF STUDENTS PER BLOCK: 1
    SELECTIVE AVAILABLE DURING BLOCKS: All
    COURSE CODE: SOMDF - two week code Contact Crawford Plummer for Housing
    SOMDG - 4 week code (318) 330-7626 / mplumm@lsuhsc.edu

    .5 credit

    Primary Goals of Selective:

    To provide student’s experience in the application of essential Family Medicine skills, attitudes, and knowledge in an outpatient clinic setting.

                                                                                                   

    Specific Objectives:

    •   Students will document a History, Physical exam, Assessment, and plan by obtaining a medical history and physical exam findings relative to the common and major disorders encountered in the Family Medicine inpatient service for each patient assigned.

       •  Students will develop an assessment and plan on their patients.

    •   Students  will  discuss  documentation  requirements with  the  Family  Medicine faculty  using  the appropriate recording of medical information.

       •  Students will be able to compare the effects of social and cultural variables on the health of patients in the

    clinic.

    •   Students will discuss practical applications of fundamental principles of medicine and specific disease entities through conferences, reading and other self-study learning modalities.

    •  Students will gain exposure in and experience with common medical and surgical procedures.

     

     

    Resources for Learning:

     

    •  Participating Faculty: Course director, LSUHSC Family Physicians.

    •  Texts: As recommended by assigned preceptor.

    •  Hands-on Experience: Supervised evaluation and management of clinic patients in an outpatient setting.

    •  Computer Assisted Instruction: Library research

    •  Directed Readings: As recommended by assigned preceptor.

    •  Self-Directed Learning: Focused review of topics directly related to patient care utilizing library and online resources.

     

     

    Evaluation:

     

    •  Students will receive a passing grade if they complete all required activities as presented above, and demonstrate the professional attributes essential to the practice of medicine.  These professional attributes include; appropriate grooming, punctuality, attendance at all required activities unless appropriately excused, a respectful of all faculty and staff.   This list is not all- inclusive.   The course director will complete evaluation forms with input from clinic preceptors and residents.  The course director will determine the final grade. Students at risk of failing will be handled on a case-by-case basis, they will be notified personally and/or in writing of any concerns in a timely fashion, and will be offered a reasonable opportunity to improve their performance.

    •   The course director will ensure achievement of all objectives by all students primarily by their participation in regular small group discussions.  The course director may develop and require students to complete self-study and evaluation forms when necessary to document achievement of course objectives.

     

     

          1.     List any specific core physical exam skills to be taught in your course

     

    •  Specific skills taught will vary as patients permit. Core examination skills learned in the junior year including examination of the head, neck, heart, lungs, abdomen and extremities will be reinforced.

     2.     List any specific clinical skills as well as attitudes and behaviors that you will be evaluating during your course and how these will be done in a structured manner (LCME)

     

    •   Skills and behaviors will be evaluated by review of the evaluation form completed by the assigned preceptors and by direct communication between the course director and the assigned preceptors.  Specific attention will be given to attendance, maturity, fund of knowledge, self-education, oral and written presentations, clinical skills and improvement noted during the course.

          3.     Copy of evaluation form to be used in your course for the grade determination

     

         4.     Grading process, number and timing of evaluations

     

    •  Preceptor evaluation will occur in an ongoing fashion and results will be submitted verbally as necessary throughout the rotation and formally submitted by evaluation form at the completion of the rotation.

     

    5.     Identify handouts, text and other major resources to be purchased by students or provided by the department if different from previously provided

     

    •      Standard medical texts and library resources will be utilized.

     

         6.     Describe any computer usage anticipated for the course

     

    •     Computer  time  will  be  used  to  research  specific relevant  medical  problems  identified by  the  assigned preceptor during the course of practice.   Library and Internet resources will be available.   The course director will assist the student in this endeavor and provide topics for research when none are identified in the course of practice.  Outpatient lab computer use will also be encouraged.

     

          7.     Describe any anticipated teaching of or use of problem solving skills to be part of your course. (LCME)

     

    •      Clinical problem solving will be taught in the ongoing care of patients.  Review of problems, critical thinking, differential diagnosis, and literature utilization as these things relate to patient care will be explored.

     

          8.     List which medical school objectives will be covered at least in part within your course objectives (LCME)

     

    •      Demonstrate a working knowledge of the normal structure and function of the human body and its major organ systems; the structural and homeostatic dysfunction’s that cause disorders; the impact of human development, growth, and aging on normal and disordered structure, function, and behavior; and the pathophysiologic basis of human diseases.

    •                  Demonstrate the ability to evaluate patients, organize and present patient information, and properly manage medical problems by: being able to conduct a medical history and physical examination (comprehensive and focused); developing judgment concerning when a comprehensive or focused evaluation is appropriate; reliably eliciting appropriate information in a history and detecting abnormal findings on the physical examination; correctly identifying the patient’s medical problems, including psychosocial and behavioral problems; formulating accurate hypotheses as to the causes and solutions of these problems; developing appropriate strategies for exploring these hypotheses, including the use of laboratory tests and imaging studies; properly and safely performing routine technical procedures; and formulating a management plan.

    •      Diagnose and manage patients with common acute and chronic medical conditions; recognize and institute initial treatment for patients with serious or life-threatening conditions.

    •      Critically read, analyze, and interpret the biomedical literature to stay informed and current with developments in medicine.

    •                  Access and evaluate epidemiological data relating to risk indicators for disease in order to practice effective preventive medicine and to foster healthy behavior.

    •      Develop skills in the use of computers and related technologies to: study and access current clinical information; retrieve, analyze, document and relay information about patients; communicate optimally with peers and faculty; and collect, analyze, interpret and report information regarding clinical cases and biomedical research.

    •      Treat patients using accepted moral and ethical guidelines; exhibit integrity and compassion, understand the importance to patients of privacy and dignity; and give careful attention to the impacts of human diversity, the needs of the medically underserved, and the needs of dying patients when no cure is possible.

    •      Recognize the unique nature of the doctor-patient relationship: demonstrate respect for the roles of other health care professionals; communicate effectively orally and in writing with patients, patients’ families, colleagues, and other medical personnel.

    All

    Pass/Fail


Interdisciplinary

  
  •  

    ELECT ERSRH - General Research Elective


    ELECTIVE DIRECTOR(S): Ellen Friday PhD PHONE:
    DURATION OF ELECTIVE: 4 Weeks
    LOCATION OF ELECTIVE: LSU Health Sciences Center
    MAXIMUM NUMBER OF STUDENTS: 1 MINIMUM NUMBER OF STUDENTS: 1
    COURSE CODE: ERSRH
    MUST HAVE PRIOR CONSENT TO SCHEDULE
    Not offered during Blocks 5 and 6

    1 credit

    GOALS

     

    Independent research under the direction of an Identified faculty member

     

     

    OBJECTIVES

     

    1. Identification of a specific research question to be addressed prior to enrolling in the elective.
    2. Completion of a written report summarizing the research conducted during the rotation.
    3. Additional project-specific objectives to be assigned by the faculty research mentor.

     

    SPECIFIC DUTIES OF SENIOR STUDENTS

     

     

    To be determined by faculty mentor in conjunction with elective director.

     

    READING ASSIGNMENTS

     

    To be assigned by faculty mentor depending on the assignment

     

     

     

    Evaluation

    After review of research work by research mentor and elective director, student will receive a pass/fail grade.

     

    It is important to note that this elective cannot be used for the 8 weeks of independent research time required for the Research Distinction track, as it is to be used for fulfillment of academic credit.

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    TOTAL NUMBER OF HOURS PER WEEK:       32      

    All except blocks 5 and 6

    Pass/Fail

  
  •  

    ELECT ESCSR - Clinical Science Review 1


    ELECTIVE DIRECTOR(S): Mark Platt, Ph.D., Assistant Dean of Academic Affairs PHONE: 675-5341
    DURATION OF ELECTIVE: 4 Weeks
    LOCATION OF ELECTIVE: LSU Health Sciences Center
    MAXIMUM NUMBER OF STUDENTS: 85 MINIMUM NUMBER OF STUDENTS: 1
    ELECTIVE OFFERED DURING BLOCKS: I, II, III, IV (other by permission of course director)
    COURSE CODE: ESCSR

    1 credit

    GOALS:

    Students will complete a course of independent study in order to maximize the successful passage of the United States Medical Licensure Examination (USLME), Step 2 Clinical on the first attempt.

     

     

    OBJECTIVES:

    By completion of the course the student will:

     

    1. Participate in aprogram of independent and self-directed studying and learning of clinical the sciences
    2. Schedule a personal counseling session with the Assistant Dean for Student Affairs if identified as an “at risk student” for failure of USLME Step 2, Clinical Knowledge. (The Dean of Academic Affairs will notify the student of their risk category.)
    3. Take the Comprehensive Clinical Science Self-Assessment prior to taking USLME Step 2, Clinic Knowledge examination with achievement of a passing score.
    4. Report the CCSSA score to the Dean of Academic Affairs.

     

     

     

    SPECIFIC DUTIES OF SENIOR STUDENTS:

     

    Independent study for ULSME, Step 2, Clinical Knowledge

    Successful Completion of the Comprehensive Clinical Science Self-Assessment Exam from NBME.

     

     

     

     

     

    READING ASSIGNMENTS

     

    To be determined by each individual student.

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    HOURS PER WEEK

    CONF         HRS          WARD            HRS        LAB                    HRS      LIBRARY       HRS

    OR                  HRS         CLINIC            HRS        LECTURE                  HRS          READING    HRS  Independent study: 40

    TOTAL NUMBER OF HOURS PER WEEK:               40

    Blocks 1-4 (other by permission of course director)

    Pass/Fail

  
  •  

    ELECT EWDER - Dermatology elective


    Course Director: Ryan Jones , M.D.
    Elective Category: Online
    Administrative Contact: Felicia Jackson
    Number of Students Per 2 Week Block: 20 Elective Available During Blocks: 4 - 7 only
    Course Code : EWDER Non-LSUHSC Students Allowed: No

    .5 credit

    Specific Features of this Elective:

    This 2-week elective web-based rotation will utilize scientifically researched and approved modules on Dermatology. Students may complete the assigned coursework from any Internet accessible location.

     

    Goals

    The primary course goal is to provide students with a basis in dermatology so they may be competent in their future training. A secondary goal of the course is to provide an educational medium while students are pursuing interviews.

    Objectives

    At the end of this 2-week rotation each student will be able to:

    • Develop a systematic approach to the skin examination
    • Perform a full body skin examinations in a clinical setting
    • Recognize and describe various dermatological conditions seen in the clinical setting.
    • Recommend an initial treatment plan for a patient presenting with a specific dermatological condition
    • Describe the various morphologies of inflammatory disorders
    • Describe the various morphologies of infectious skin disorders
    • Recognize the utility of KOH examination and interpreting the results
    • Describe the morphology of reactive disorders
    • Differentiate the manifestations of Stevens-Johnson syndrome, toxic epidermal necrolysis, and drug-induced hypersensitivity syndrome
    • Identify and describe the morphology of benign and malignant neoplasms.
    • Determine when to refer a patient for further evaluation by a dermatologist
    • Develop an effective self-study approach

     

     

    Evaluation:

    This is a Pass/Fail - Must Pass course. All course requirements must be completed by the end of the Block in which the course is taken. After completion of all portions of the assigned 2-week course, students will take a multiple choice exam ending with a cumulative score of 75% or greater.  Should a student’s cumulative score fall below 75%, he/she will repeat courses at a chosen location.  Students are only allowed to repeat the exam once. Failure to pass the exam on a total of two attempts will lead to repeating the entire course.

     

    Professional Burden on student: While this course has been designed to aid students in pursuing interviews and travel, it is also to foster skills in lifelong independent learning. Before you begin the rotation you are recommended to do the following:

    1. Reflect upon your individual goal for this rotation
    2. Review the course requirements on the first day of the rotation so you know how much time you will need to dedicate.
    3. Review your travel plans, Internet availability in advance, all of the material can be downloaded to your computers and if you are going to be traveling, It is your responsibility to ensure that you have the ability to review your course work before you leave.

     

    Professional attributes are as important in this rotation as in others. Failure to complete course requirements within the specified duration will be considered unprofessional.

    Software requirements: Most of these modules have versions in PowerPoint, PDF or webinars that require a flash player version. Please make sure you have the appropriate software to review the information

    Resources for Learning

    Welcome to the web based dermatology course. Following are your assignments:

    Use the American Academy of Dermatology website:

    http://www.aad.org/education/medical-student-core-curriculum/learners-guide-for-students

    Medical Student Core Curriculum

    Review goals and objectives for the curriculum (in left hand column on website).

    Once goals & objectives have been reviewed click on “Suggested Order of Modules”. You will follow the suggested order for the two week course. This is a self-paced course and you can do as many or as few modules a day as you like.

     

    Quiz

    You will be able to take the quiz any time during the last three days (Friday, Saturday or Sunday) of the course.  The quiz will be a 30 question multiple choice exam assigned to you in ExamSoft. Once you start the quiz, you will have 1 hour to complete it. If you have conflicts with the available quiz dates, you should contact Ms. Jackson to make arrangements for the exam to be given on a different date.

    Blocks 4-7 only

    Pass/Fail

  
  •  

    ELECT EWEKG - Electrocardiography elective


    Course Director: Ryan Jones , M.D.
    Elective Category: Online
    Administrative Contact: Felicia Jackson
    Number of Students Per 2 Week Block: 20 Elective Available During Blocks: 4 - 7 only
    Course Code : EWEKG Non-LSUHSC Students Allowed: No

    .5 credit

    Specific Features of this Elective:

    This 2-week elective web-based rotation involves self-paced, and self-directed learning. Students may complete the assigned coursework from any Internet accessible location.

    Goals

    The major course goal is to achieve competence in Basic Electrocardiography Skills. A secondary goal of the course is to explore self- directed learning so students may be able to further their education while interviewing.

    Objectives

    At the end of this 2 week rotation each student will be able to:

    • Analyze an EKG correctly.
    • Recognize the rate, rhythm and axis of EKGs
    • Describe the normal morphology of each waveform in each lead
    • Diagnose abnormalities like LVH, RVH, on the EKG
    • Diagnose the various manifestations of ischemia on an EKG
    • Differentiate between left and right bundle branch blocks
    • Describe the appearance of different electrolyte abnormalities on the EKG
    • Differentiate various wide and narrow complex tachycardia
    • Differentiate between the AV blocks
    • Interpret the rhythm
    • Use time management techniques effectively
    • Develop an effective system of independent learning

     

    Evaluation:

    This is a Pass/Fail - Must Pass course. All course requirements must be completed by the end of the Block in which the course is taken. After completion of all portions of the assigned 2-week course, students will take a multiple choice exam ending with a cumulative score of 75% or greater.

    Should a student’s cumulative score fall below 75%, he/she will repeat courses at a chosen location.  Students are only allowed to repeat the exam once. Failure to pass the exam on a total of two attempts will lead to repeating the entire course.

    Professional Burden on student: While this course has been designed to aid students in pursuing interviews and travel, it is also to foster skills in lifelong independent learning. Before you begin the rotation you are recommended to do the following:

    1. Reflect upon your individual goal for this rotation
    2. Review the course requirements on the first day of the rotation so you know how much time you will need to dedicate.
    3. Review your travel plans, Internet availability in advance, all of the material can be downloaded to your computers and if you are going to be traveling, It is your responsibility to ensure that you have the ability to review your course work before you leave.

     

    Professional attributes are as important in this rotation as in others. Failure to complete course requirements within the specified duration will be considered unprofessional.

    Resources for Learning

    Welcome to the web based ECG course.:

    http://www.fammed.wisc.edu/medstudent/pcc/ecg/ecg.html

    -Please complete all lessons on the UW-Madison Website (Videos Not Required)

    http://ecg.bidmc.harvard.edu/maven/displist.asp

    -Complete case numbers 4,9,10,25,36,58,57,81

    Quiz

    You will be able to take the quiz any time during the last three days (Friday, Saturday or Sunday) of the course.  The quiz will be a multiple choice exam assigned to you in ExamSoft. Once you start the quiz, you will have 1 hour to complete it. If you have conflicts with the available quiz dates, you should contact Ms. Jackson to make arrangements for the exam to be given on a different date

    Blocks 4-7 only

    Pass/Fail

  
  •  

    ELECT EWGEN - Genetics elective


    Course Director: Ryan Jones , M.D.
    Elective Category: Online
    Administrative Contact: Felicia Jackson
    Number of Students Per 2 Week Block: 20 Elective Available During Blocks: 4 - 7 only
    Course Code : EWGEN Non-LSUHSC Students Allowed: No

    .5 credit

    Specific Features of this Elective:

    This 2-week elective web-based rotation will utilize scientifically researched and approved modules on Genetics. Students may complete the assigned coursework from any Internet accessible location.

     

    Evaluation:

    This is a Pass/Fail - Must Pass course. All course requirements must be completed by the end of the Block in which the course is taken. After completion of all portions of the assigned 2-week course, students will take a multiple choice exam ending with a cumulative score of 75% or greater.

    Should a student’s cumulative score fall below 75%, he/she will repeat courses at a chosen location.  Students are only allowed to repeat the exam once. Failure to pass the exam on a total of two attempts will lead to repeating the entire course.

    Professional Burden on student: While this course has been designed to aid students in pursuing interviews and travel, it is also to foster skills in lifelong independent learning. Before you begin the rotation you are recommended to do the following:

    1. Reflect upon your individual goal for this rotation
    2. Review the course requirements on the first day of the rotation so you know how much time you will need to dedicate.
    3. Review your travel plans, Internet availability in advance, all of the material can be downloaded to your computers and if you are going to be traveling, It is your responsibility to ensure that you have the ability to review your course work before you leave.

     

    Professional attributes are as important in this rotation as in others. Failure to complete course requirements within the specified duration will be considered unprofessional.

    Software requirements: Most of these modules have versions in either PowerPoint, PDF or webinars that require a flash player version. Please make sure you have the appropriate software to review the information

    Resources for Learning

    Welcome to the web based genetic course. Following are your assignments:

    Use the given links to go through the following diseases:

    Amyloidosis

    http://nordphysicianguides.org/wp-content/uploads/2012/02/Amyloidosis_10_22.pdf

    Gaucher disease

    http://nordphysicianguides.org/gaucher-disease/

    Hereditary Angioedema

    http://nordphysicianguides.org/wp-content/uploads/2012/02/HAE_3_8.pdf

    Homocystinurias

    http://nordphysicianguides.org/wp-content/uploads/2012/02/Homocystinuria_11_29b.pdf

    Infantile spasms

    http://nordphysicianguides.org/infantile-spasms/

    Myelofibrosis

    http://nordphysicianguides.org/myelofibrosis/

    Pompe disease

    http://nordphysicianguides.org/pompe-disease/

    Treacher Collins syndrome

    http://nordphysicianguides.org/wp-content/uploads/2012/02/Treacher_booklet_web.pdf

    Tyrosinemia type 1

    http://nordphysicianguides.org/wp-content/uploads/2012/02/Tyrosinemia-2_3_11.pdf

     

    Use the link below to go through the following webinars/pdfs and fact sheets.  The objectives for each activity are stated in the beginning:

    •  

     

    1. Integrating Genetics in Primary Care-Why Does it Matter?
    2. Building an Accurate Family History, Constructing a Pedigree-An Overview for Primary Care
    3. Ordering the Right Tests-Genetics in Primary Care
    4. Genetics Evaluation, Referrals, and More-What To Do Next (only PDFs)
    5. Myths of Primary Care Providers and Patients/Families Regarding Genetics-Setting the Record Straight
    6. Heard About Genetic Counseling? What Does it Mean for You, Patients and Families?(only PDFs)
    7. Genetics Across the Lifespan-Putting It All Together (only PDFs)
    8. Epigenetics-What Your Patients are Asking, What You Need to Know (only PDFs)

    Quiz

    You will be able to take the quiz any time during the last three days (Friday, Saturday or Sunday) of the course.  The quiz will be a multiple choice exam assigned to you in ExamSoft. Once you start the quiz, you will have 1 hour to complete it. If you have conflicts with the available quiz dates, you should contact Ms. Jackson to make arrangements for the exam to be given on a different date

    Blocks 4-7 only

    Pass/Fail

  
  •  

    ELECT EWRAD - Radiology elective


    Course Director: Meghna Chadha , M.D.
    Elective Category: Online
    Administrative Contact:
    Number of Students Per 2 Week Block: 20 Elective Available During Blocks: 4 - 7 only
    Course Code : EWRAD Non-LSUHSC Students Allowed: No

    .5 credit

    Specific Features of this Elective:

    This 2-week elective web-based rotation involves self-paced, and self-directed learning. Students may complete the assigned coursework from any Internet accessible location.

    Should there be a question regarding an image or diagnosis, the course director is available for trouble-shooting via email, telephone or in-person.

     

    Goals and Objectives

    The major course goal is to provide students with a foundation in basic radiology so they may familiarize themselves with commonly performed exams and be competent as interns.

    A secondary goal of the course is to provide an educational medium while they are pursuing interviews.

    Objectives

    • Order a Radiologic investigation using an appropriate manner
    • Order the most appropriate radiological exam for the clinical indication
    • Recognize a technically adequate Chest radiograph, including most commonly performed views
    • Describe the normal anatomy on radiographs of the chest and abdomen
    • Diagnose common abnormalities on a chest radiograph, with at least 2 differential diagnosis
    • Differentiate the radiological manifestations of various common lung pathologies
    • Understand normal radiographic views for musculoskeletal exams
    • Utilize radiological investigations in the setting of trauma
    • Familiarize oneself with radiologic findings in arthritis
    • Familiarize oneself with the most common ultrasound applications in the ER
    • Recognize the solid organs on CT of the abdomen
    • Use time management techniques effectively
    • Develop an effective system of independent learning

     

    Requirements

    Going to Moodle and reading the information about the course is number one.  This is a Pass/Fail - Must Pass course. All course requirements must be completed by the end of the block in which the course is taken. After completion of all portions of the assigned 2-week course, students will take a multiple choice exam ending with a Quiz score of 75% or greater.

    Should a student’s Quiz score fall below 75%, he/she will repeat course in the following block. Students will not be allowed to repeat the exam during the block.  You will receive an incomplete if you fail to pass the quiz. Please keep in mind; if you take the late block in December and do not pass the Quiz, then the incomplete may interfere with financial aid.  

    Professional Burden on student: While this course has been designed to aid students in pursuing interviews and travel, it is also to foster skills in lifelong independent learning. Before you begin the rotation you are recommended to do the following:

     

    1. Reflect upon your individual goal for this rotation
    2. Review the course requirements on Moodle the first day of the rotation so you know how much time you will need to dedicate.You will NOT receive an email repeating what is on Moodle.You will only receive an email with the Quiz password so you may take it during the rotation.
    3. Review your travel plans and Internet availability in advance.All of the materials are on the internet and most require the use of the LSUHSC-S F5 VPN (instructions for access can be found here http://lib.sh.lsuhsc.edu/node/21).  In addition, a current ExamSoft account is needed.  If you are going to be traveling, it is your responsibility to ensure that you have the ability to review your course work before you leave.

     

    Professional attributes are as important in this rotation as in others. Failure to complete course requirements within the specified duration will be considered unprofessional.

    The examination for this course is based on the following modules.  YOU are REQUIRED to review these on your own and be ready to take the test at the appropriate time.

    Emergency Ultrasound - The VPN is NOT required to access this resource.
    http://www.med-ed.virginia.edu/courses/rad/edus/index.html

    AccessMedicine > Basic Radiology, 2e  The VPN is required to access this resource.
    http://accessmedicine.mhmedical.com/book.aspx?bookid=360

    You will only need to access the designated sections in the chapters below.

    Chapter 1. Scope of Diagnostic Imaging

     

     

    Scope of Diagnostic Imaging: Introduction

     

     

    Chapter 3. Imaging of the Heart and Great Vessels

     

     

    Imaging of the Heart and Great Vessels: Introduction

    Techniques and Normal Anatomy

    Technique Selection

    Exercise 3-1. Increased Heart Size

    Exercise 3-2. Alterations in Cardiac Contour

    Exercise 3-3. Pulmonary Vascularity

    Exercise 3-4. Vascular Abnormalities

     

     

    Chapter 4. Radiology of the Chest

     

     

    Radiology of the Chest: Introduction

    Techniques

    Technique Selection

    Exercise 4-1. The Opaque Hemithorax

    Exercise 4-2. Lobar Atelectasis

    Exercise 4-3. Airspace Diseases

    Exercise 4-4. Diffuse Lung Opacities

    Exercise 4-5. Airway Disease

    Exercise 4-6. Solitary Pulmonary Nodule

    Exercise 4-7. Pulmonary Neoplasm

    Exercise 4-11. Mediastinal Masses and Compartments

    Exercise 4-13. Pleural Effusion

    Exercise 4-14. Pulmonary Vascular Disease

    Exercise 4-15. Interstitial Lung Disease

     

    Chapter 7. Imaging of Joints

     

     

    Techniques and Normal Anatomy

    Technique Selection

     

    Exercise 7-1. Congenital Joint Disorders

    Exercise 7-4. Arthritides

     

    Chapter 8. Plain Film of the Abdomen

     

     

    Plain Film of the Abdomen: Introduction

    Technique and Normal Imaging

    Technique Selection

    Exercise 8-5. Increased or Decreased Density in the Abdomen

     

     

    Chapter 10. Gastrointestinal Tract

     

     

    Gastrointestinal Tract: Introduction

    Examination Techniques

    Normal Imaging

    Technique Selection

     

     

    Exercise 10-1. Dysphagia

    Exercise 10-4. Small-Bowel Obstruction

    Exercise 10-6. Colonic Obstruction

     

    Please make sure that you know how to access the library material off campus.

     

    Quiz

    You will be able to take the quiz any time during the assigned time of the elective. The quiz must be completed by the Sunday after the last Friday of the course.

    It is a multiple choice quiz. 

    The Quiz must be completed in 60 minutes and is timed by ExamSoft and you may only download and take the quiz once.  If you fail to pass, then the next opportunity to take the test will be the following rotation.  You will receive an incomplete.

    The Quiz has been revised for the 2017-2018 year.

    Blocks 4-7 only

    Pass/Fail

  
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    IDSP 111 - Basic Biochemistry, Molecular, and Cellular Biology I


    2 Credits

    This course provides an introduction to the basic biochemical properties of amino acids and proteins, a discussion of protein assembly and folding into the three dimensional structures required for function, and an introduction to basic principles of enzyme kinetics, examples of enzyme active site structure, and mechanism of action. Topics on membrane lipids, membrane transport, carbohydrates, and the important biochemical processes and enzymes that cells utilize to generate metabolic energy are also included in this section.

  
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    IDSP 112 - Basic Biochemistry, Molecular, and Cellular Biology II


    2 Credits

    Selected features of the metabolism of carbohydrates, lipids, amino acids and nucleotides are presented with discussions of the important mechanisms cells utilize to regulate these processes. The course concludes with a basic introduction to nucleic acids structure and function: replication, transcription, RNA processing, and protein synthesis.

  
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    IDSP 113 - Genetics


    1 Credit

    This course will provide the student with an overview of classical genetics as well as an in-depth consideration of several fundamental processes involving DNA, including its recombination and repair. The course will also explore the emerging areas of genomics and proteomics. Lectures and discussions of the current literature will comprise the course.

  
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    IDSP 114 - Cell Biology


    2 Credits

    An introduction to cell structure and the mechanisms underlying cell division and protein trafficking. The course will focus on the cell biology of the nucleus, regulation of the cytoskeleton, secretory pathways, endocytosis, protein targeting, ubiquitin-mediated proteolysis, apoptotic mechanisms, mechanisms of cell division and cell cycle control, the mechanisms involved in protein and membrane trafficking, and adhesion-mediated biology. Lectures and discussions of the current literature will comprise the course.

  
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    IDSP 115 - Molecular Signaling


    1 Credit

    A modern comprehensive course concerning the regulation of cellular signaling processes in eukaryotic cells. Emphasis will be placed on the molecular mechanisms involved and approaches used to understand receptor-mediated signaling and signal transduction pathways. Attention is also focused on the current molecular and cellular biological techniques used today in the investigation of these important cellular processes.

  
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    IDSP 116 - Biochemical and Molecular Methods


    1 Credit

    The principles and application of common methods used for detection and analysis of macromolecular structure, function, and interaction will be discussed. This course covers biochemical methods of separation and detection of macromolecules as well as molecular analysis. Three hours of introductory biostatistics are also included. The goals of the course are: to develop an understanding of basic methods applied to the study of proteins and nucleic acids; to become familiar with the instrumentation used for these methods - familiar in the sense that students should be aware what instrumentation is required and have a basic idea how it is used; and to become aware of the ways that these methods and techniques are applied to study of macromolecules, i.e., have some idea what methods can/should be used to study a particular problem. There will be some form of out of class work for most lectures, including problems, literature reviews, and visits to core facilities and major equipment and use of some equipment. There will be one exam at the end of the course.

    Course is offered: Fall, Annually

    Prerequisites for course: to be taken concurrently with IDSP 111 , IDSP 112 .

  
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    IDSP 117 - Methods in Biomedical Sciences: Recombinant DNA and Cell Biology


    1 Credit

    Goals are the same as for IDSP 116  . This course covers recombinant DNA methods including cloning and gene expression, DNA sequencing, PCR, and mutagenesis. The course also covers analysis of nucleic acids and proteins, including interaction detection methods, genomics and proteomics and also covers direct observation methods of analysis and immunological methods. There will be one exam at the end of the course.

     

  
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    IDSP 119 - Gene Expression


    1 credit

    This course will provide the student with an overview of fundamental processes of transposition and transcription in procaryotes and eukaryotes.  The course will also explore the emerging areas of gene transfer, siRNA and model systems of eukaryotic gene expression. Lectures and discussions of the current literature will comprise the course.

  
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    IDSP 201 - Introduction to Human Cancer-Research, Treatment and Prevention


    2 Credits

    This will be a two credit introductory course team taught by basic scientists and clinical scientists. Four topics will be covered including: 1) An introduction and overview of cancer; 2) cancer cell biology; 3) the diagnosis, treatment and prevention of cancer and 4) the molecular pathogenesis and treatment of specific cancers. The focus of this course will be to provide information concerning what is currently understood about the biochemical mechanisms operating during neoplasia and will include up to date information about oncogenes, tumor suppressor genes, metastasis, angiogenesis, tumor immunology, diagnostic approaches (conventional and molecular) and treatment modalities. The course will consist of lectures that stress the research approaches and finding that currently form the basis for our understanding of how neoplastic cells arise and form cancers. This course will form the basis for more advanced courses in the cell and molecular biology of cancer.

  
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    IDSP 202 - Mechanisms of Cancer Invasion and Metastasis


    1 Credit

    An advanced course, involving lecture and discussion, to study the processes involved in the development of metastatic disease. Students will learn the fundamentals, including the key molecules, events and signaling pathways that are directly involved in the invasive/metastatic process. Import seminar papers as well as current literature will be used in student discussion.

  
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    IDSP 203 - Discussions in Cancer Biology


    .5 Credit

    The Cancer Biology Journal Club is designed to explore the latest published research in a variety  of  cancer-related  topics  including  tumor  invasion  and  metastasis.  Students  will  discuss published findings with the group and propose future directions the research might take. The primary goals of the journal club are to enhance information learned in the Cancer Courses and to improve the research abilities of the participants.

  
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    IDSP 211 - Foundations of Biomedical Sciences I -General Principles


    1 Credit

    An integrative introduction to cell physiology/anatomy and to the general principles of pharmacology.

    Course is offered: Fall, Annually

    Prerequisites for course: None.

  
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    IDSP 212 - Foundations of Biomedical Sciences I - Cardiovascular System


    2 Credits

    An integrative approach to the physiology, anatomy, histology and pharmacology of the cardiovascular system.

    Course is offered: Fall, Annually

    Prerequisites for course: None.

  
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    IDSP 213 - Foundations of Biomedical Sciences I -The Renal System


    1 Credit

    An integrative approach to understanding the kidney’s role in maintaining homeostasis. Emphasis will be on global regulation of salt, water and acid/base balance seen from a traditional as well as molecular perspective. Where available “knockout” animals and functional expression analyses are incorporated.

    Course is offered: Spring, Annually.

    Prerequisites for course: None.

 

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